Braided electric rope or hi-tensile wire?? - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Barns, Boarding, and Farms > Barn Maintenance

Braided electric rope or hi-tensile wire??

This is a discussion on Braided electric rope or hi-tensile wire?? within the Barn Maintenance forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category
  • Problems with electric braided rope
  • Electric braided rope

View Poll Results: Braided electric rope or hi tensile wire
braided electric rope 11 57.89%
hi tensile wire 8 42.11%
Voters: 19. You may not vote on this poll

Like Tree5Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    07-12-2012, 06:28 PM
  #11
Green Broke
I have had no problem with electric polyrope, now up for 5+ years. 1 strand, 3' high, 30' between t-post/rebar posts. Fast, cheap, easy to maintain. Love it.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    07-12-2012, 11:03 PM
  #12
Foal
I would have to say that if you are putting it up for the long run put up Hi-tensile and build it right. If you are setting up something that may only be there a couple of years the rope or tape would be more economical and easier to store and take up. I tend to like to run 1 strand of the white tape anyway just for visibility.
Evan with the cattle pastures here which they run barbed wire I run 1 strand of the whit tape fence around the upper half. That way if the horses do get out they can see it. The problem I ran into with the rope/tape is that on a dry year a weed must have been against the fence and created an spark. The neighbors corn field caught on fire and my whole fence line was burned up. Wire won't do that. Also the white poly insulators deteriorate and break easily, yellow black and red seem to last better.
     
    07-13-2012, 02:03 AM
  #13
Started
Rope!! Easy to see, easy to move around, easier to set up, although it won't last as long as wire. If a horse gets tangled in it, it WILL break.
     
    07-13-2012, 09:45 AM
  #14
Yearling
I have used both and prefer the rope.

The wire is good for large areas if the proper wire is used and you have the tools to work with it. If you cheat even a little bit on installation, it is horrible to work with and maintain. I had a horse run full tilt into a 3 strand wire fence and it held, however, the horse bounced right off it and flipped up and completely over the fence landing on her back. She ended up with some wire burns and a lot of soreness, but no major cuts. I don't know if it would have been any better if the fence had broken or given to the impact.

Now, I use a white 3/8" nautical grade Poly-rope with 6 strand conduction wire woven through it. I really like it because it is strong, visible, easy to work with and easy to maintain. It looks good too. Like the wire however, you must install it correctly with proper tension and connectors. The tools required are minimal and it is very easy to work with. I use treated wood posts with screw in insulators and they work great. In two years with temps ranging from -40 to +35 celcius, wind, rain, snow, hail, etc, I've not had to do any repairs. The only thing I have noticed is the rope stretches a bit when it's cold, so I watch the tension in the winter. I also keep some extra rope and step in posts on hand for cross-fencing. This way I can rotate grazing within my pastures in any configuration with minimal set up. We do electrify the top wire about 25% of the time and the horses don't ever offer to challenge it. I think the rope has a 10 year warranty.
     
    07-13-2012, 02:53 PM
  #15
Showing
Electric wire needs to have a min of 3000 volts going thro it for horses to respect it. 2000 might work but guaranteed between 3 and 5000 will keep horses away from it. Horses are taught to back away from pain. Other animals go in to pain. It the chest is getting shocked the animal will keep going forward until the wire either breaks, or passes over or under and he continues on.
     
    07-14-2012, 01:43 PM
  #16
Yearling
Ok, thanks everyone for your input!!! :)
     
    07-15-2012, 11:05 PM
  #17
Foal
I'ts not always true that rope will break. Rope will break for *some* horses. A friend's gelding got caught in electric rope and it did break, but not before he suffered severe cuts that took months to heal.

Electric rope will NOT break for foals, weanlings or young horses.

We lost a 6 month old filly to our Electrobraid fence. She somehow got the lowest strand wrapped around her hind leg and couldn't get free of it. When we found her she was dead, her body still warm. There was not a scratch on her except for a small dime-sized cut on a front knee. The fence was charged and we think she must have died of heart failure from being shocked repeatedly. It haunts me to this day.

Take my advice: If you have to keep foals or weanlings in paddocks with electric rope, disconnect the charge from the lower strand (or two). I learned the hard way - electric rope fencing can KILL young horses.
     
    07-16-2012, 12:23 AM
  #18
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by xlntperuvian    
I'ts not always true that rope will break. Rope will break for *some* horses. A friend's gelding got caught in electric rope and it did break, but not before he suffered severe cuts that took months to heal.

Electric rope will NOT break for foals, weanlings or young horses.

We lost a 6 month old filly to our Electrobraid fence. She somehow got the lowest strand wrapped around her hind leg and couldn't get free of it. When we found her she was dead, her body still warm. There was not a scratch on her except for a small dime-sized cut on a front knee. The fence was charged and we think she must have died of heart failure from being shocked repeatedly. It haunts me to this day.

Take my advice: If you have to keep foals or weanlings in paddocks with electric rope, disconnect the charge from the lower strand (or two). I learned the hard way - electric rope fencing can KILL young horses.
There is also two types of the rope fencing, the actual rope and the twine stuff. Rope:
http://www.straightlinefencing.co.uk...icRope4Sml.jpg
Twine: http://www.rammfence.com/wh_polywire_05.jpg?w=350

The twine should break very easily, although it is harder to see. It is easier to move, more temporary, and you can tie it together. Rope is easier to see, harder to break, and you have to use special metal things to hold it together when it breaks.
     
    07-16-2012, 03:03 PM
  #19
Yearling
My horses usually respect the fence, I just have a yearling at the moment, and was planning on going with 3 or 4 strands of rope 2 white and 2 black that way its visible in the winter too.
Xintperuvian i'm so sorry for you loss, that would be really hard. And I will probably only charge the 2 top strands, unless of a threat of a predator since we have many roaming around and walking up to our neighbors cars

Thank you all!!!
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Introducing your horse to electric wire fencing WyldBlu Horse Training 31 01-17-2012 09:19 AM
Making High tensile smooth wire fencing safer? BigGirlsRideWarmbloods Barn Maintenance 2 06-23-2011 11:00 PM
I've decided to go with the regular galvanized electric wire, HOW far should the .... nyg052003 Barn Maintenance 7 04-28-2011 03:15 PM
Can I use Hot Wire and Electric Rope together? nyg052003 Barn Maintenance 1 03-30-2011 08:59 PM
Is There Some Special Trick to Electric Tape Vs. Wire? CrufflerSteve Barn Maintenance 4 02-23-2011 09:53 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:25 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0