Crushed limestone stall floors saturated in cow manure - what should I do? - The Horse Forum

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post #1 of 13 Old 06-19-2012, 10:48 AM Thread Starter
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Crushed limestone stall floors saturated in cow manure - what should I do?

Hi. I recently moved to a 5.5 acre property with a well-built existing horse barn. Unfortunately, the previous owner has allowed neighbors with cows to have free run of all three outward facing stalls and the manure is piled high in each stall. I got one stall down to what I have confirmed (via text to previous owner) is crushed limestone. However, it is totally saturated and uneven from years of cows going inside each stall and poor upkeep.

I would like to improve drainage and the base in general and eventually put mats and bedding down, but for now I am letting the current stall that is down to basically the crushed limestone air out.

Do I just put new rock/limestone/sand on top? Do I have to figure out how to dig out the old limestone? How do I figure out a drain situation?

Also, I am open to other options, like asphalt/concrete. Does it go directly above this soiled limestone?

All advice welcome. I will eventually redo all three stalls, but one at a time because I am having a hard time getting the neighbors to take their cows out. We've been here three weeks.

Thanks,
GSDSPIRIT
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post #2 of 13 Old 06-19-2012, 11:13 AM
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We use crusher run out here a lot, and it does eventually become uneven. What we do out here is to put down a good layer of ag lime on the floor, the powdered version not pelleted, then let that sit for a bit to dry things out and 'sweeten' things up. You can then put another layer of crused limestone on top and water it in and tamp it down and level it out. Then the floor will be good as new. Once you get that done, put down mats and then I like stall skins over the mats. The rock is porous and the urine will drain some but with mats on top you'll need regular bedding for most of the urine and just clean daily.

As for the neighbors cows, send them a certified, return receipt letter that states they have until XXXX date to remove them or they'll be considered abandoned and sent to slaughter. If they aren't paying board, you may not even have to give them 30 days, check with the courthouse on that one. Ask for info on a 'stablemen's lein' or some places it's called an 'innkeeper's lein', if they don't remove the cows, you'll have several years worth of beef in the freezer.

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post #3 of 13 Old 06-19-2012, 12:39 PM
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reading between the lines on your post , you said "previous owner" and moved in. So I am assuming you are the owner ? In that case I don't understand the hard time, getting animals out part. Tell them you just bought the place and need them moved immediately...
I am upgrading my barn soon. Is there an advantage to the crushed limestone over crush and run ? My stalls would pretty much just be run in shelter and feeding areas. My original plan is crush and run with porous stall mats over.
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post #4 of 13 Old 06-19-2012, 12:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gsdspirit View Post
because I am having a hard time getting the neighbors to take their cows out. We've been here three weeks.
Who contacted them? When? And how?

Did you purchase or are you renting?
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post #5 of 13 Old 06-19-2012, 05:14 PM Thread Starter
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Yes, we are the new owners. The previous owner had a deal with the neighbor (who has disabled children who participate in cow 4H projects) and I don't want to ruin any future neighbor relationship by telling them to get out. They have offered beef in exchange, but they are doing much damage to the grounds, stalls, etc. I figured if I actually use my barn for the projects we've decided to do (goats/rabbits/chickens/horses) they will get the hint and take them out.

I need them to use their bobcat to clean out the remaining two stalls so I can do to them what I am doing to the first stall.

I have decided to scrape up as much cow crap as I can, pressure wash the stall walls (covered in cow dung), let the stalls air dry, apply powdered lime, apply several inches of crushed limestone, then mats, then shavings. Does this sound like a decent option that allows for drainage, etc?

Thanks!
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post #6 of 13 Old 06-19-2012, 07:08 PM
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Properly installed mats don't allow drainage so you should be fine with your plan.
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post #7 of 13 Old 06-19-2012, 08:09 PM
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I vote for crushing run. We are putting the floors in our stalls right now with drainage holes full of gravel, crushing run to level out and sand on top. If we have to stall anyone, we can throw shavings on top the sand.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gsdspirit View Post
Yes, we are the new owners. The previous owner had a deal with the neighbor (who has disabled children who participate in cow 4H projects) and I don't want to ruin any future neighbor relationship by telling them to get out. They have offered beef in exchange, but they are doing much damage to the grounds, stalls, etc. I figured if I actually use my barn for the projects we've decided to do (goats/rabbits/chickens/horses) they will get the hint and take them out.
We owned a piece of property some years ago and the neighbor decided since we weren't actually living there it would be OK to cut our fence and run his cattle through. Took us several weeks to get him to remove all the cattle and halfway repair our fence. Unfortunately, the cattle had knocked out one of the barn walls in the interim and he wouldn't help with that at all since his cows didn't do it.
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post #8 of 13 Old 06-20-2012, 09:55 AM
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Just because the cattle have to leave shouldn't have a bearing on the relationship between the previous owner and the owner of the cattle. If the property owner had been so concerned he wouldn't have sold the property. It is not your responsibilty so why shoulder it.
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post #9 of 13 Old 06-20-2012, 10:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gsdspirit View Post
They have offered beef in exchange, but they are doing much damage to the grounds, stalls, etc. I figured if I actually use my barn for the projects we've decided to do (goats/rabbits/chickens/horses) they will get the hint and take them out.

I need them to use their bobcat to clean out the remaining two stalls so I can do to them what I am doing to the first stall.
So you have only hinted at them?
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post #10 of 13 Old 06-20-2012, 10:40 AM
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NO SAND should ever be in a stall. Hasn't any one heard of sand colic?
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