Do you have to use concrete for run in sheds? - Page 2
 
 

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Do you have to use concrete for run in sheds?

This is a discussion on Do you have to use concrete for run in sheds? within the Barn Maintenance forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category

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        09-24-2013, 06:36 PM
      #11
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by horsecrazygirl13    
    The shed we're building is only 12x10ft I don't see why you need concrete for a shed that small...

    If you're that dead set against it why ask our opinions at all? It seems that most people would say yes, use concrete, a tiny bit more work now will mean less repairs later. It's easier to just do it when you're building - it's so easy and fast I don't see any reason not to for all the extra support it adds.
         
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        09-24-2013, 06:44 PM
      #12
    Foal
    Ever think to build it on skids? We have the Tall Mini Barn for hay, and the 10x20 horse shelter from this website

    Miller Barns ~ Home

    We are actually going to have him build our goat barn on a smaller scale of the horse barn. We love his work :) And it's cheaper than we could do it ourselves
         
        09-24-2013, 07:22 PM
      #13
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by horsecrazygirl13    
    We are building a run in shed for my horse and my dad wants to use these things() to set the posts in, instead of setting them into the ground with concrete. Would that work? Those spikes are about 3ft long.
    I think these are for portable sheds to keep them from blowing away. Totally different type of she then one set in concrete.
         
        09-26-2013, 11:57 AM
      #14
    Foal
    For the little bit of extra time it takes I would either use concrete, or set your posts at least 5 feet in the ground. I think concrete would be easier ;) After having my horses home and the amount of scratching, rolling (posts get kicked occasionally), etc. that goes on in the run in shed - they would eventually take it down if the posts weren't set in concrete lol.

    Not to mention the occasionally hurricanes and strong winds we get would weaken it over time as well. During Sandy a tree fell on a part of the barn and only the edge of the roof was damaged. The posts and structure survived.
         
        09-26-2013, 02:56 PM
      #15
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Nickers2002    
    For the little bit of extra time it takes I would either use concrete, or set your posts at least 5 feet in the ground. I think concrete would be easier ;) After having my horses home and the amount of scratching, rolling (posts get kicked occasionally), etc. that goes on in the run in shed - they would eventually take it down if the posts weren't set in concrete lol.

    Not to mention the occasionally hurricanes and strong winds we get would weaken it over time as well. During Sandy a tree fell on a part of the barn and only the edge of the roof was damaged. The posts and structure survived.
    What if we set the spikes into concrete? We are using 4x4s.

    I'm not dead set against concrete.
         
        09-26-2013, 03:24 PM
      #16
    Weanling
    I really like the protability of a shed on skids, myself.
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        09-26-2013, 05:13 PM
      #17
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by horsecrazygirl13    
    What if we set the spikes into concrete? We are using 4x4s.

    I'm not dead set against concrete.
    Setting spikes into concrete will give you a tiny bit more stability than just using the spikes, but if you're willing to sink spikes into concrete why not do the whole post? Using those spikes connected to a post is only going to be as strong as its weakest point, which is where it'd be connected to the post. - they add a weak link in there. The concrete wouldn't help much there. One long, thick post set into concrete would be so much more stable.
         
        09-26-2013, 05:23 PM
      #18
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Shoebox    
    Setting spikes into concrete will give you a tiny bit more stability than just using the spikes, but if you're willing to sink spikes into concrete why not do the whole post? Using those spikes connected to a post is only going to be as strong as its weakest point, which is where it'd be connected to the post. - they add a weak link in there. The concrete wouldn't help much there. One long, thick post set into concrete would be so much more stable.
    How far should you set a 4x4 post into concrete?
         
        09-26-2013, 05:31 PM
      #19
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by horsecrazygirl13    
    How far should you set a 4x4 post into concrete?
    For the size you're looking at 2 feet should be fine.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Northernstar likes this.
         
        09-26-2013, 06:30 PM
      #20
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PaintHorseMares    
    For the size you're looking at 2 feet should be fine.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Does it have to go down farther than the frost line? Here it is around 6 feet. It would be impossible to find posts that long.
         

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