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dry lot help

This is a discussion on dry lot help within the Barn Maintenance forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category
  • Best dirt or gravel for mini horse
  • Caseymyhorserocks drylots

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    05-05-2013, 04:52 PM
  #21
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Left Hand Percherons    
That's 5,000 sq ft per horse. 500 sq ft is only 10x50. I have runs on my barn that are 15x40 (600sq ft). They work but if they don't get out for days because of weather or my work schedule, they are climbing the walls. You only have about 14,500 sq ft to work with or an area about 100x150ft. What do you have to keep in that area? Only the horses? Dealing with mud is an ongoing problem when you have to confine them to a small area. One of the keys is to limit how much they can move around when there is mud. Walking stirs things up making it worse. I would look at making small feeding pens/holding areas at the high point of the pen. You can do as small as 12x12 (the size of a stall). Put down something like roadbase and slope it so the water runs out of the 1/3 acre (not into it). .
I've heard that stone dust or slag is prefered over roadbase because roadbase is too harsh.

Another thing to consider, more with smaller runs than larger dry lots, is if they have room to run. A rectangular run is better than a square in that regard.
stevenson likes this.
     
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    05-05-2013, 06:15 PM
  #22
Started
Stone dust is basically a size in between pea gravel and sand. It will get dusty in dry weather, so therefore pea gravel is ideal if you don't live a moist environment year round. Pea gravel is also great for horses hooves, it won't dry them out and drains out the moisture.

I will go outside and take a picture of my dry/mud- lot area. It is about 110 feet long, with half the width being about 30 feet and the other half being about 50 feet in length, it is used for two horses in winter. We just put down a couple inches of dirty pea gravel in the front part, we had road base before with some dirt/mud. Road base is okay if it is compacted very well, so if it was an old road (which mine was) or you drive across it a lot, you shouldn't have to much of a problem. You would want a comfy dirt or sand area for the horse to lie down though. If you don't compact road base well enough, the big rocks will sit on top and the horses can get bruised from them. And my wood fence with 3- 2x6 boards has the posts spaced 8 feet apart.
     
    05-05-2013, 06:52 PM
  #23
Started
Here is my dry lot. First picture is front road view, second picture shows the pea gravel on the left and road base on the right. There is a dirt rolling area down towards the end off to the side. We left about 20 feet at the end of the run just plain road base because that is where the horses poo and we ran out of gravel. Ignore the fence, a deer ran through it the other day and the horses haven't been in here in months so it is a bit neglected!
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File Type: jpg IMG_2899.jpg (101.3 KB, 38 views)
     
    05-05-2013, 06:57 PM
  #24
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by caseymyhorserocks    
Here is my dry lot. First picture is front road view, second picture shows the pea gravel on the left and road base on the right. There is a dirt rolling area down towards the end off to the side. We left about 20 feet at the end of the run just plain road base because that is where the horses poo and we ran out of gravel. Ignore the fence, a deer ran through it the other day and the horses haven't been in here in months so it is a bit neglected!
you have electric fencing in your dry lot? Casey, how many loads of gravel did you use to cover your dry lot(if you don't mind).
     
    05-05-2013, 07:00 PM
  #25
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevenson    
My post are 10 - 12 ft apart and the pipe pens are 30 ft long and 18 ft wide.
The can hop and bounce around, roll, run up and down some.
When it rains its muddy. Only way to get them out of the mud would be a Barn with Box stalls.
1 1/2 acres of irrigated pasture with hay is fine for two horses. Depending on your area and what type of grass . I have two horses out on 2 and 1/2 acres and they get small flakes of hay and are fat. My pasture is irrigated and is the grazing bermuda pasto rico . This is also the type of bermuda that is used for haying. It is not just seed from the big box stores. I have 3 other horses out on a smaller pasture, and they are all fat (smaller horses that get along )
dont you have footing?
     
    05-05-2013, 07:13 PM
  #26
Yearling
If I get the drainage fixed, would I still need footing? I am sort of worried about the dust from plain dirt in summer. I have no idea how much footing would cost.
     
    05-05-2013, 07:42 PM
  #27
Yearling
Could I use this horse netting to fence the dry lot instead of the rails? It's less expensive and easier to transport.
HORS-FNC N/C 12.5/10G 48"X100'
     
    05-05-2013, 07:46 PM
  #28
Started
Well, we had the gravel around an old play-set which we sold and spread some of it around the horse area. I believe its something like 18 yards or so for 2" deep in a 20x100 area. 2" is not going to do much, but since there is about 18" of road base under that (with a bit of dirt on top) it will hopefully be good enough for my horsies.

About how many inches of mud do you normally get? It is recommended to get enough gravel as mud plus one or two additional inches. If you get 3 inches of mud, you would want 4-5 inches of gravel. It is a good idea to put down textile fabric stuff to prevent the gravel from being ground into the dirt. I have heard of rock salt being spread across horse arenas and paddocks to help bring down dust, but I have never tried it. Unless you have very little mud in a poorly drained area, you will want to have footing and good drainage. Also, don't use any wood products that could decompose like wood chips, shavings, or straw as they will just turn into more mud.

Edit- yes, woven wire makes an excellent horse fence, as long as the holes are 2x4" or smaller. If they are any larger a horse could get his hoof stuck in the fence. Horses love to itch their butts on the no climb so it is a good idea to put up an electric strand in front of the fence. With no climb, you can use t-posts which are cheaper and easier to install than the wooden posts, but it is a good idea to put wood posts up around the high stress areas (corners, water troughs, etc.).
     
    05-05-2013, 08:01 PM
  #29
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by caseymyhorserocks    
Well, we had the gravel around an old play-set which we sold and spread some of it around the horse area. I believe its something like 18 yards or so for 2" deep in a 20x100 area. 2" is not going to do much, but since there is about 18" of road base under that (with a bit of dirt on top) it will hopefully be good enough for my horsies.

About how many inches of mud do you normally get? It is recommended to get enough gravel as mud plus one or two additional inches. If you get 3 inches of mud, you would want 4-5 inches of gravel. It is a good idea to put down textile fabric stuff to prevent the gravel from being ground into the dirt. I have heard of rock salt being spread across horse arenas and paddocks to help bring down dust, but I have never tried it. Unless you have very little mud in a poorly drained area, you will want to have footing and good drainage. Also, don't use any wood products that could decompose like wood chips, shavings, or straw as they will just turn into more mud.

Edit- yes, woven wire makes an excellent horse fence, as long as the holes are 2x4" or smaller. If they are any larger a horse could get his hoof stuck in the fence. Horses love to itch their butts on the no climb so it is a good idea to put up an electric strand in front of the fence. With no climb, you can use t-posts which are cheaper and easier to install than the wooden posts, but it is a good idea to put wood posts up around the high stress areas (corners, water troughs, etc.).
Thanks. How thick should the posts be and how far apart? Do I I need bracing? If yes what kind? Thanks again.
     
    05-05-2013, 09:17 PM
  #30
Started
For t-posts with no climb? 10 foot spacing is ideal. I would use 8 foot t-posts pounding them 3 feet into the ground so you have 5 feet of t-post above the ground. I assume you are doing 4 foot tall no climb right? With the 5 feet above ground and 4 foot tall no climb you will have plenty of room to install a strand of electric on top. It is a good idea to cap the top of the t-posts to prevent a horse from skewering himself on the top, you can even get caps that have built in slots for the electric wire/rope like these-
T-Post CAPR Insulator Black
If you are doing a small paddock (like 20x20), I would recommend using wood posts. We used square 4x4s for our posts, we bought them in 6 foot lengths and dug them 2 feet into the ground, putting rock at the bottom of the hole, but this was a wood fence for big pastures. For the no climb in the small area I would have the posts be 5 feet above ground so you could either install a board or electric wire on top.

You should use an H brace in the corners, here is a how to. Be sure to put electric sticking out in front of the brace to avoid horses getting a leg stuck.
http://www.premier1supplies.com/img/instruction/36.pdf
     

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