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Electric fence-not working?

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  • My electric fence is not working
  • Horse fence charger has electricity to it but not working

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    12-29-2012, 11:57 AM
  #21
Trained
^^^ Agreed. We've used 1 strand of electric polyrope for a very long time with no problems. The mares will graze right up to it, but don't mess with it.
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    12-29-2012, 12:08 PM
  #22
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by horsecrazygirl13    
He has never escaped so im not too worried as long as the fence works. The wire is up to his chest, so how should he come out? And yes, there is only one wire between him and freedom.
Well if you're fence is not working properly and he is testing it it is only a matter of time before he realizes he can push through it, or as DHW stated, if he is grazing under the fence and is spooked for any reason, head comes up, gets zapped, and under the fence he goes. If there is at least another wire at grazing height that scenario would not happen because he would not be able to reach below that other wire. I have known horses to drop their head and run under single wires that only separate paddocks from larger pastures, every experience is training, good or bad.

I have also had deer land on top of my fence and tear it (evidence from deer tracks and struggle marks from it), my horses did not get out because I had another wire there (but they were definitely checking it out), so visually there was still a barrier, and it allowed the electric to still be run the entire fence instead of stopping there, and leaving most of my fence uncharged.

Not saying horses can't be kept in one strand enclosures, but I would only use them temporarily for the reasons stated above.
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    12-29-2012, 12:44 PM
  #23
Green Broke
If a horse decides to go through an electric fence it doesn't matter if it's 1, 2 or 3 strand. They are much stronger than a fence and will go through, the difference is how much damage they do to themselves in going through it.

Not all areas are suitable for multi strand wiring to keep horses from grazing under the top wire. Where I live, in the spring, grass grows so darn fast you practically have to cut it every day to keep it from grounding out the lower wire. Later in the year there is other grass/weed related issues that mainly impact the lower wire and still a pain to keep from grounding out the wire. We don't get the snow here but that's a major problem for lower wires in snowy areas, 6-8 inches of snow and your fence is grounded out. I'm sure other areas have their own issues with low hot wires.
     
    12-29-2012, 03:28 PM
  #24
Showing
In Canada with our snow the horse is no longer touching the earth. This is necessary to make a single strand work. You are going to have to run a second wire which will be attached to the "ground" on your charger. This is why it works in the summer but not the winter. Been there, had to do that.
     
    12-29-2012, 04:00 PM
  #25
Green Broke
Get a fence tester. Also is there a break or split in the wire. Is it touching any place ?
     
    12-31-2012, 03:34 AM
  #26
Foal
I agree if a horse really wants to go through no number of strands will keep him in. I live in an area where grass grows at a fast rate certain times of the year as well as multiple feet of snow in winter, I have not had an issue with my low impedance fencer and if I notice high areas I get out there with a weed whip or stomp the fence line myself. My bottom line is about a foot and a half? Off the ground, my best guess without measuring. I only have 2 strands poly tape right now, but I am planning on adding another strand in the spring.

I am confident that putting my gelding in a one strand enclosure would keep him in, but I would feel very unsafe about it. Maybe its just me? I like the insurance of at least one more strand there just in case something ever happens to the other.
     
    12-31-2012, 11:36 AM
  #27
Trained
It's not so much about "3 strands are "mechanically" keep them in", it's the higher possibility of getting zapped when trying to get to the greener grass on the other side. With one, they will eventually eat under and the more body can go on the other side, the more likely they flee forward and out when zapped.
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    12-31-2012, 12:35 PM
  #28
Foal
Yes, and it is also a visual deterrent so they don't think that there is wide open spaces there while their head is down. Another lower strand completely prevents the duck and run under scenario. All it takes is for horse to test and not get shocked or duck under once and they just learned a new, potentially dangerous behavior.

I would rather my horses not be able to get out if I can even slightly prevent it, and I would be devastated if they caused an accident from being loose, and more than likely be liable for injuries as well, since I live in a "fence in" state.
     
    12-31-2012, 03:55 PM
  #29
Yearling
electric fence

Hiya heres a check list.
1 has the battory got plenty of charge is it old as the cold will drain it as well.
Has it a wind turbine or a solar pannel to keep the battory charged.
Does the battory need charging.
2 have you checked the earth connection to the earth stake and how wet is the ground as well I know you have snow but if its dry the earth will be poor.
3 have you checked the live supply to the fence line have you got a tester.
4 have you got bad joints in oyur fence line.
5 is electric leaking to earth vire bad insulator pots vegitation on fence line insulator pots broken fence wire on the ground.
If its damp and wet can you see it sparking in the dark whilst it pulseing.
If you have steel posts and plastic insulators there could be an earth problem there.
6 how long is your fence line is it to long for your energiser.
I will instruct you on how to make a rudementry tester get a nail about 2-6 inchs long a peice of wire insulated strip both ends wrap 1 bare end around the nail and push into the soil then bring the other end to the live fence line don't be afraid as your insulated by the insulation on the wire.
As the unit pulses bring the other bare wire next to the fence line about 2 miller meters so the electric arks to the earth testing wire in your hand.
An electric fence unit discharges 8500 volts.
You can test your fence line like this.
A special tester will have a voltage scale so it will tell you your strength of your fence line.
Are the capatators dammaged dew to earthing out to long not discharging the correct voltage the out put may need to be tested for the correct voltage present at the discharge pulse.
If you need any more advice please ask hopefully I can help you resulve your problems.
     
    12-31-2012, 03:59 PM
  #30
Yearling
electric fence

You may have to run out extra earths from the earth point a ground wire to extra earth stakes along the fence line.
     

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