Is this fine with my Fencing
   

       The Horse Forum > Barns, Boarding, and Farms > Barn Maintenance

Is this fine with my Fencing

This is a discussion on Is this fine with my Fencing within the Barn Maintenance forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category
  • Would 4by4 post be enough for horse barn post
  • Using 4x4 post for horse fencing

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    11-28-2010, 12:30 AM
  #1
Weanling
Is this fine with my Fencing

I am going to go 2 strands of rope wire with the first wire at 2 ft then the 2nd wire at 4 ft. Then I was gona go at 4 ft 6 with a 1x6 all the way around the top. How far apart do the post for the 1x6's need to be? I now the rope can be further apart than the 1x6's though. I guess I can go 12 or even 16 ft apart for the roping right?
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    11-28-2010, 12:44 AM
  #2
Showing
I don't think I would go any farther apart than about 10 feet. Just for the simple fact that if you have a sudden wind come up, it would be fairly easy for a 1x6 to be broken if it is a long way between support posts.
     
    11-28-2010, 10:49 AM
  #3
Weanling
Is 1 foot fine for the post depth? I will be using either a 4x4 or something a little similar in size. Maybe a little bit smaller as I saw home depot had 8 ft post, rounded edges for $3.97 each while the 4x4's most other places I checked were near 6 bucks. The ones home depot has might be slightly smaller than a 4x4 but they are good sizes, I think they are just rounded edges but they are not the older type round wood posts though. I might also used t post but more than likely it will be the wood post cause I want to put the 1x6's around the top; at least for the front side and corners near the house. I might actually not put 1x6's around the whole thing.
     
    11-28-2010, 11:28 AM
  #4
Green Broke
Depending on your frost line in your area may determine depth, regardless I would not go less than 3 ft into the ground and typically 4'
     
    11-28-2010, 11:47 AM
  #5
Banned
Churumbeque is exactly right.

Standard rule is at least 1/3 of the post's length should be under ground.

Sinking them 1 foot will virtually guarantee that the posts will lean and fall over.

I would not go smaller than a 4" x 4" post either; something smaller will not support the weight of the 1" X 6". I'd recommend you go with 8' between your posts. You might get away with 10 or 12', but if you look at the cost of lumber; it might actually be cheaper to do 8' centers and 16' boards. This is also a more secure configuration than a having a join on every post.
     
    11-28-2010, 11:51 AM
  #6
Showing
Those rounded edge 4x4s is what I have a lot of and use on a lot of my fencing. I agree though that 1 foot isn't deep enough. Your main problem with that would be whenever it rains, the ground gets soft and soggy down farther than that and you posts would end up leaning and sagging. I would suggest taking it about as deep as you can but no shallower than 2 feet. That's about as deep as I can ever take mine because my place sits on a rock shelf and it is nearly impossible to go much deeper than that without dynamite LOL. I occasionally have a problem with saggy posts but it's usually only when a horse has been leaning on the fence.
     
    11-28-2010, 12:20 PM
  #7
Banned
For a 4' fence, you need a 6' post (2 feet in the ground, 4 feet above.) For a 4' 6" or 5' fence, you need an 7 - 8' post. The great thing about using 8' is that you then have a little room for error and can trim the tops of the posts to be even without compromising on height.

I also think the 4" rounds work great, especially for the electric rope or electrobraid fencing where you want the wire to be able to move or slide on the post
     
    11-28-2010, 09:51 PM
  #8
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by maura    
churumbeque is exactly right.

Standard rule is at least 1/3 of the post's length should be under ground.

Sinking them 1 foot will virtually guarantee that the posts will lean and fall over.

I would not go smaller than a 4" x 4" post either; something smaller will not support the weight of the 1" X 6". I'd recommend you go with 8' between your posts. You might get away with 10 or 12', but if you look at the cost of lumber; it might actually be cheaper to do 8' centers and 16' boards. This is also a more secure configuration than a having a join on every post.
If I am going with T post along the back side of the pasture and the side that's gona be near the woods, is it the same rule of thumb as far as how deep to knock them in the ground? I will get probably 8 ft t post and I guess go 3 ft in the ground? Or if I get 7 ft ones, then 2 ft
     
    11-29-2010, 05:28 AM
  #9
Banned
1/3 of 7 feet is 2' 4"; 1/3 of 8 feet is 2' 8".

If you're going to use T posts for a long straight run of fencing, consider sinking a 4" wood post every 5 or 6 posts for extra stability and support.
     
    11-29-2010, 07:14 AM
  #10
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by maura    
1/3 of 7 feet is 2' 4"; 1/3 of 8 feet is 2' 8".

If you're going to use T posts for a long straight run of fencing, consider sinking a 4" wood post every 5 or 6 posts for extra stability and support.
u mean sinking them right next to the t post for bracing?
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bit Problems.. Fine Bitless? AnnaLover Horse Tack and Equipment 18 07-03-2010 12:38 PM
The show was fine, but my boy is hurt. CecilliaB Horse Shows 10 04-26-2010 09:48 AM
Help Everything was fine but now..... Phantomcolt18 Barn Maintenance 21 03-17-2010 10:07 AM
looking fine coming into spring yankee doodle Horse Pictures 7 08-30-2009 09:25 PM
Bad or is it Fine? horseluver50 Horse Riding 12 07-31-2009 09:53 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:25 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0