Fixing my mud issue, NW readers please chime in... - The Horse Forum
 3Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 19 Old 03-30-2012, 12:20 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Vernonia OR
Posts: 25
• Horses: 3
Fixing my mud issue, NW readers please chime in...

I don't know if horse owners in other regions have as much of a problem with rain and mud as those of us in the NW do but I am looking for ideas.

I have a 3 stall barn with entries on the outside. Even though we are on the top of a hill, due to the soil/clay content, our drainage is CRAP. From October to May/June we have deep mud outside the stalls. This is causing all our horses to get weird fungus stuff on their feet and lose hair because they are perpetually globed up with mud and they often would rather stand out in the rain than struggle through the sloppy mud, in some places as much as 12" deep.

So I am looking for ideas on how to fix this. I have a couple ideas that I am entertaining but I am of course open to anything at this point.

Idea A:
1.Bring in a "Bobcat" and dig out all the mud/dirt down to about 2' deep in an area as wide as the entire stall area and about 15'-20' out (distance from barn doors to outer edge).
2.Dump a truck load of 2"-3" crushed rock in the area and level that out.
3.Put Sand or dirt back on top of the rock so the surface is soft enough for the times of year when they don't have shoes.
Theory:This would allow the water to sink down and move freely through the rock layer and pool there or run off to the edges where there will still be mud but at least it won't be in front of the stalls.

Idea B:
1. Bring in a backhoe and dig trenches approx 1' wide and 2'-3' deep and 20' long, at a 90 degree angle from the barn wall, about 4' apart. From above this would look like a big "comb" with the trenches being the blades of the comb.
2. Take 1-3 lengths of 5" perforated PVC pipe and lay them side by side in each trench running the length of the trench.
3. Fill the trenches with 2"-3" crushed rock and sand alternating layers and cover with dirt.


I thought about just digging out and pouring a cement slab over the whole area but that would be cost prohibitive.

I am open to ideas, thanks for taking the time to read and respond if you are so inclined.
MuGGzy is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 19 Old 03-30-2012, 12:26 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: MN
Posts: 561
• Horses: 0
If you have a farmer in the area that has the stuff to TILE it that may be the cheepest quickest way.
cowboy bowhunter is offline  
post #3 of 19 Old 03-30-2012, 12:49 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Vernonia OR
Posts: 25
• Horses: 3
Do you mean rototill? Or some kind of tiles?

Tilling (with a rototiller) seems like it would just turn the entire area into even worse soup.
MuGGzy is offline  
post #4 of 19 Old 03-30-2012, 01:12 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Oregon
Posts: 5,471
• Horses: 2
Tiling is when you put in drainage piping below ground to take the water away.

Being an Oregonian maybe I can help. Clear your area, I would say a good 12 feet out front of your barn. Lay down construction carpet, there are two types. One does not allow water to penetrate and one does. Use the carpet that allows water to penetrate. What the carpet does is keeps the mud from swallowing up your rock, which it will. Put down 6 inches of 3 inch crushed rock then pack it. Layer that with 4 or more inches of unwashed 3/4 minus, pack it down every 1.5-2 inches. You want don't want it washed, the finer particles help lock everything together for solid footing. If it's washed the rock will move around with every step and end up wallowing out.

Next you have to keep as much water off the area as possible. Make sure your drainage is away fromt he barn, ditch if needed. Lot of barns don't have gutters, put them on and make sure the water is piped away from the barn. Barn should be a high point if at all possible.

You also have to maintain gravel you put down. Keep the weeds from growing in it. Clean the dropped hay and such swept off. Scrape off any manure that your horses drop on it. If you don't do this the muck will just build up on top of it.
yadlim likes this.
Darrin is offline  
post #5 of 19 Old 03-30-2012, 01:12 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Michigan
Posts: 6,772
• Horses: 2
My area has lots of clay too and the drainage was horrible. I just recently did this last week actually...

We have a fairly powerful John Deer Tractor, so I dug between 12-18 inches (depending on the spots) and dumped it far far away. LoL

We have an auger that we can hook to the tractor. It drills about 16 inches diameter, and about 4 feet down. In a 15' by 50' area, I drilled over 40 holes. Cleaned them out and scraped all the excess dirt/clay out. I made a hole every 1-1/2 to 2 feet.

Filled the holes with sand, and then put a top layer of sand between 8 and 14 inches. It's working like a charm! I have more areas to do but I'm very happy so far with my outcome. It's been pouring today and I don't have any mud in the area where I did this. Horses are liking it a lot too.
stevenson likes this.

"The greatest pleasure of a dog is that you may make a fool of yourself with
him and not only will he not scold you, but he will make a fool of himself too."

-Samuel Butler
CLaPorte432 is offline  
post #6 of 19 Old 03-30-2012, 01:29 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 409
• Horses: 0
I live in Shohomish, WA - so I am right there with you!!! Actually, I gave up and moved my horses to a stable because I couldn't take the mud any more!

I LOVE your idea #1 or Darrin's idea. I think either would work.

The stable I am at just keeps dumping 2" gravel in all the bad spots and letting the mud swallow it up. I have to keep the horses shod, but there are dry places to walk.

I have seen one other thing work, but you have to have luck for it to work out. If you can get in good with an arborist to deliver you a steady supply of wood chips from cleanign up trees - you can lay down about four feet of that and it works great. The problem is that you need to add another foot or so every year. It makes for a nice comfortable walking surface.

In eight years I have never been able to get a single load...
yadlim is offline  
post #7 of 19 Old 03-30-2012, 01:47 PM
mls
Trained
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: MN
Posts: 5,464
• Horses: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by CLaPorte432 View Post
We have an auger that we can hook to the tractor. It drills about 16 inches diameter, and about 4 feet down. In a 15' by 50' area, I drilled over 40 holes. Cleaned them out and scraped all the excess dirt/clay out. I made a hole every 1-1/2 to 2 feet.
What are you going to do when these areas settle and you have holes?
mls is offline  
post #8 of 19 Old 03-30-2012, 01:52 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Michigan
Posts: 6,772
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by mls View Post
What are you going to do when these areas settle and you have holes?
If it comes to that, I'll fill with more sand and/or pea gravel if needed.

We did this a few years ago in another area and to this day have never had an issue with the area's settling and causing a problem. I really pack the sand down in the holes. We've also done it to our driveway with major success.

"The greatest pleasure of a dog is that you may make a fool of yourself with
him and not only will he not scold you, but he will make a fool of himself too."

-Samuel Butler
CLaPorte432 is offline  
post #9 of 19 Old 03-30-2012, 02:07 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Oregon
Posts: 2,791
• Horses: 2
I just want to chime in for a bit of NW support. I am in Dallas, Oregon, west of Salem and man, do we have mud!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Will it ever stop raining!!!
nvr2many is offline  
post #10 of 19 Old 03-30-2012, 02:20 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 38,966
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by CLaPorte432 View Post
My area has lots of clay too and the drainage was horrible. I just recently did this last week actually...

We have a fairly powerful John Deer Tractor, so I dug between 12-18 inches (depending on the spots) and dumped it far far away. LoL

We have an auger that we can hook to the tractor. It drills about 16 inches diameter, and about 4 feet down. In a 15' by 50' area, I drilled over 40 holes. Cleaned them out and scraped all the excess dirt/clay out. I made a hole every 1-1/2 to 2 feet.

Filled the holes with sand, and then put a top layer of sand between 8 and 14 inches. It's working like a charm! I have more areas to do but I'm very happy so far with my outcome. It's been pouring today and I don't have any mud in the area where I did this. Horses are liking it a lot too.
what an interesting idea! So , these vertical "tubes" of sand kind of suck moisture from the surrounding soil and mud?
tinyliny is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Arab breeders..chime in!! annaleah Horse Breeds 4 12-23-2011 10:56 PM
Readers - good or bad? Shasta1981 Dressage 40 11-09-2011 10:38 PM
Any other readers? StormyBlues Hobbies 59 07-15-2010 01:59 PM
Fixing Up an Old Trailer jackieboy2 Horse Trailers 2 05-11-2010 12:46 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome