Help me put together "the list" - Page 3
 
 

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Help me put together "the list"

This is a discussion on Help me put together "the list" within the Barn Maintenance forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category

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        10-20-2013, 09:34 AM
      #21
    Green Broke
    You have some great suggestions here! Hope it doesn't take too long to get things up & running. But if you want to bring in outside $$, folks will have to be able to find you~~maybe a discreet ranch sign?
         
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        10-20-2013, 09:48 AM
      #22
    Showing
    Everyone else has done a good job on the list just wanted to say congrats!!! I will also second wares suggestion for a skidsteer. Of all of our equipment (tractor, quad, skidsteer) that is what I use the most. DH calls it my "gas powered wheel barrow". Lol!
         
        10-21-2013, 04:51 PM
      #23
    Green Broke
    Thank you for all the suggestions everyone!! I really appreciate it!

    I am adding to the list and will update the list and share pics and stuff soon. We are looking at a property on Friday and I think its "the one"! It is a serious fixer upper but the price is right, the property has recently been used for haying. It has a solid barn on it already that is just the barn, nothing built inside. So its perfect for starting out. We will do stalls and stuff inside. We have priced out the indoor arena structure. We are going to go with tin. We are now pricing out footing to do the indoor and outdoor.

    I can't believe this is happening! I will try and get some pics of the barn and stuff when we look at it.
    SamBadger likes this.
         
        10-21-2013, 05:42 PM
      #24
    Weanling
    Wd-40. :)
         
        10-21-2013, 07:20 PM
      #25
    Foal
    You ***need*** a fire safety plan and protocol(as in, no open flames near the hay) for your students and boarders. Map out a fire exit and regularly plan fire drills, requiring all people using your facilities to attend a drill and learn your protocols. In the case of liability this can be a life-saver. Same with any possible natural disasters in your geographical location. Make sure you map out a drill for handling your equine clients that's as careful as is your human drill. Especially if your stalls only have one entrance - and that entrance is inside the building, with no back doors that open to penned runs.

    If you have the funding, invest in a fire-safety sprinkler system; those overhead sprinklers that set off at the sense of smoke. Be sure you find some that are resistant to dust.

    Invest in extra helmets, boots, chaps, crops, spurs, etc (in various sizes), that you can use for lesson students who forget any of the items listed. I can't tell you how many times I had to lend someone my helmet because their parents didn't read the barn requirements. Invest in decent tack for each of your lesson horses. One barn I've heard of ran into serious issues using recycled saddles for their several different lesson horses; another had custom-fit tack made for each horse they used in their lesson program. The tack room was neatly organized with each horse's tack plainly laid out. Find yourself a happy medium.

    Adequate grain/feed containers, preferably rodent proof.
    Plenty of trot poles/standards/big scary decorations/traffic cones.
    Plenty of school provided halters for your horses.
    Baling twine, scissors, and handy-man tools for various situations.
    A good sit-down session with a lawyer to discuss everything YOU need to know before opening a place that puts you in serious liability, especially when such liabilities involve horses.
    Something to drag your arenas with.
    Adequate and easily found lighting in case of a power outage (a shelf full of flashlights should do.)
    Grooming kits that you can provide for your horses.
    A clear, concise website that highlights all of your rules of conduct at your stables, which should advertise either your location or indicate that contacting you is the only way to find your location. (Can be considered really sketchy though, doing it like this.) From the sounds of it, you want a business that runs on word-of-mouth rather than flashy signs.
    A list of rules of conduct that you should teach your clients.
    That one really b****y mare that pins her ears at everyone and everything for every reason that doesn't make sense..must be a stereotypical pony or horse, female in gender required. Can be any color you desire; must be a b****.

    :P If I think of anything else useful I'll let you know.
         
        10-21-2013, 10:20 PM
      #26
    Showing
    An iron clad boarding contract. If board payment exceeds 3 days, horse will be sold at the following auction. Boarders are good with excuses when payment is overdue - you have to be real tough in this area or you will be left holding the bag which strains the marriage.
         
        10-22-2013, 02:04 PM
      #27
    Green Broke
    Very good point Saddlebag! I was thinking like a week but then that gives too many reasons for excuses.
         
        10-22-2013, 05:05 PM
      #28
    Showing
    You need to do a feasibility study which means you have to try to figure out your market. You will need to call other barns to find out what they offer and how much they charge. Then you need to get feed and bedding costs which means the cost of shavings and the cost of wheat straw (superior bedding). This study covers the day to day costs. The capitol costs are separate but part of the study as the entire study is what you take to the bank. With both the day to day and capital costs be sure to add on 30% cost overrun. You need to find out about business licensing, those costs and the cost of insurance. The bank doesn't need all the piddling costs to do with construction, just the overall cost with the overrun calculated in. If you put in a bathroom, that will entail a $12000 septic system. From where I'm sitting I'm seeing something in the $100,000 range. Since this will be run as a business you may want to amortize this over 20 years and will need to figure out how many boarders and what your profit will be to make the payments. Ultimately, you may be happier with a four stall barn with room for a couple of boarders and a much lower mortgage. With only two boarders I'd be digging a hole for an outhouse, like the pioneers used.
         
        10-22-2013, 06:01 PM
      #29
    Green Broke
    We actually were originally not going through the bank. There is a farmers co-op loan you can go through here to get up and running.

    Honestly i've been trying to convince DH i'd rather do a 6 stall barn with the indoor arena. The cost of the indoor is actually one of the lower costs we are facing, go figure.

    The property we are currently focused on has changed things a bit in terms of what we are doing and how we are going to start things up. We are now looking at a provincial funding to set up with a "hobby farm". Honestly I don't even know what the exact route of attack is in terms of financing anymore lol. DH is dealing with that aspect. I've just been told to put together the plan and help put together the expense list of starting up. He is the money man
         
        10-23-2013, 07:45 AM
      #30
    Showing
    May be I missed it on a way, but if you are going to feed hay in stalls you may want to get those mounted hay feeders (or I've seen a combination of grain/hay feeder). Unless you going to throw the hay on floor of course (but some horses will make a great mess out of hay, shavings, and pee). BTW, I also strongly recommend to check places around to find shavings in bulk - THAT will save A LOT of money.

    Also get some saddle pad racks. That was an issue in half of the barns I went to for lessons. While of course you can keep it on saddle, it's not very pleasant when it's soaking wet in summer (and you have to dry it out somewhere).

    Fans - not so sure. Especially for Canada. I'm in Maryland, and in 7 or 8 years having my own barn I used the fan (I have it in run-in, because I don't stall in summer) just handful of times (my run-in stays pretty cool even during the heat).

    I also have heavy-duty rubber mats around the outside hay feeder. While I know they are not cheap that helps A LOT to keep hay clean (we have almost no waste), and horses dry during/after the rain weather (also prevent thrush etc.).

    Good luck with getting good deals on everything! :)
         

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