Moving horses from boarding facility to our own home
   

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Moving horses from boarding facility to our own home

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  • How to help a horse that is moving to a boarding facility
  • Moving horse home from boarding barn

 
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    08-09-2012, 01:03 PM
  #1
Yearling
Moving horses from boarding facility to our own home

We're going to be moving in December and are looking to get a small horse property so I can have my boys at home with me. I've already got all the tack and whatnot to take care of my horse, but what will I need to get for keeping them at home? Most of the properties we're looking at have already had horses on them and I'm familiar with fencing as I grew up with my family's horses on our own property, but never done it on my own. The most obvious things that come to mind are water buckets and feeders. Is it really that simple?? I'm sure there are other things I should have lol
     
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    08-09-2012, 01:14 PM
  #2
Yearling
Storage containers for feed. I prefer metal garbage cans so no animals can chew into them. I have a first aid kit. Banamine. Extra halters and leads. I like having a wash rack.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    08-09-2012, 01:19 PM
  #3
Yearling
Congrats on your new place and a horse friendly one at that.

Will your horses be primarily stalled or pasture roamers? If they are stalled, you may still want to consider these items for the pasture during turnouts. If they are pastured, these items are more of a necessity.
  • 50+ gallon water troughs near a convenient water source
  • salt licks and a holder (such as a tire feeder?)
  • hay keepers if you will use round bales (more economical) or some other keeper if square. I don't like dropping hay to the ground, it gets nasty and its easier for it to get wasted
start building up your arsenal of horsey-care products.
  • Your favorite antibacterial for scrapes and bumps. There are a ton of products on the market and each seem to have their own purpose.
  • small 1" paint brushes to apply antibacterial stuff
  • Grooming tools
  • Grooming products (shampoo, main and tail conditioner)
  • Hoof care products (both for thrush and moisture retention)
  • Boots
  • Vet Wrap
  • Emergency Vet, normal hours vet, and farrier numbers
  • Grain and hay supply numbers
  • Wormers
  • Soap and towels (for you)
  • Hay forks
  • Poop forks
  • wheelbarrows
  • Grain scoop
  • Barrel with tight closing lid to keep grain
  • Blankets, turnouts, flysprays
  • Tick stuff, if you are in a tick region
  • Stall shavings
Where ever you are keeping your horses now, look around and inventory what is available. And write down every thing you touch when you are there. You may use barn property without even thinking about it. If you use it, you probably want it for your own property.
     
    08-09-2012, 01:21 PM
  #4
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowgirl140ty    
Storage containers for feed. I prefer metal garbage cans so no animals can chew into them. I have a first aid kit. Banamine. Extra halters and leads. I like having a wash rack.
Posted via Mobile Device
I think I'll do what one of my boarding facilities did for a wash rack and put down a rubber mat with holes over gravel for drainage. Seems simple enough and effective! I actually make tack, so I have plenty of halters and leads. (Just recently at a ride someone's horse got loose, so I caught it and had someone grab one of my halter and lead sets for sale at my booth!) I do like the idea of garbage cans, though I prefer plastic for weight. But thank you for the suggestions!
     
    08-09-2012, 01:28 PM
  #5
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by AQHSam    
Congrats on your new place and a horse friendly one at that.

Will your horses be primarily stalled or pasture roamers? If they are stalled, you may still want to consider these items for the pasture during turnouts. If they are pastured, these items are more of a necessity.
  • 50+ gallon water troughs near a convenient water source
  • salt licks and a holder (such as a tire feeder?)
  • hay keepers if you will use round bales (more economical) or some other keeper if square. I don't like dropping hay to the ground, it gets nasty and its easier for it to get wasted
start building up your arsenal of horsey-care products.
  • Your favorite antibacterial for scrapes and bumps. There are a ton of products on the market and each seem to have their own purpose.
  • small 1" paint brushes to apply antibacterial stuff
  • Grooming tools
  • Grooming products (shampoo, main and tail conditioner)
  • Hoof care products (both for thrush and moisture retention)
  • Boots
  • Vet Wrap
  • Emergency Vet, normal hours vet, and farrier numbers
  • Grain and hay supply numbers
  • Wormers
  • Soap and towels (for you)
  • Hay forks
  • Poop forks
  • wheelbarrows
  • Grain scoop
  • Barrel with tight closing lid to keep grain
  • Blankets, turnouts, flysprays
  • Tick stuff, if you are in a tick region
  • Stall shavings
Where ever you are keeping your horses now, look around and inventory what is available. And write down every thing you touch when you are there. You may use barn property without even thinking about it. If you use it, you probably want it for your own property.
We're trying to get a place with at least a half acre of pasture. I plan on building my own small barn (My other thread is about the most economical way to do this!), but I plan on opening up the stalls as more of a run-in. Because of this, I'm just going to put down rubber mats. If you don't put bedding in, horses will stop peeing in there because it splashes. Since I don't plan on keeping my horses in the stalls, they can go outside to do their business. This cuts down on bedding costs and barn maintenence. I'm also going to feed in the stalls, or possibly have a tire feeder in the pasture.

Forgot about antibacterial stuff - gotta start stocking up! Same with hay, poop forks, and the wheel barrows. I board my horses with a friend at the moment, so we pretty much share all our stuff (with attention to any health concerns), but I do have most of my "horse care" stuff, so I'm mainly concerned with the "property care" stuff since I don't do any of that at the moment.
     
    08-09-2012, 01:31 PM
  #6
Yearling
In addition,
  • tack repair tools
  • Extra leather cords (if you ride western)
  • Leather hole puncher
  • Leather cleaner / oil
My horse is kept at a private barn residence. I have bought a lot of my own consumables, or use and restock what I use. There are a ton of things you take for granted when there is a shelf with scarlet oil, fure-zone, and hoof dressing on it.

My barn owner does a lot of his own vet stuff. He will give shots when a horse is scraped up badly and knows a lot about what meds to give for what ailments.

In the beginning, my plan was to get the hubbie to move us out where I could keep my horse on property. After 6 months of horse ownership, I am convinced there is still much more for me to learn. My vet bills would ROCKET from the unknown if we moved and took the horse with us.

I would recommend that you build a good library of vet type books so you at least know when to call the vet.

You may also want clippers with a #10 and #30 blade.

Extra "household tools" where you keep your horsey stuff (screw driver, pliers, hammer).

Lots of garden hose.

You will also want to build a compost pile for manure that is in a near proximity but away from your everyday living.

If you are in a warm climate and have a barn/tack room, you may want to invest in a small fridge for drinks, but also some meds require chilling.

Outside of this brain dump, I really think the best place to start is where you have the horses. What does the current barn provide in terms of care? Do they worm? Medicate? Grain?

If your horses are currently pasture turnout and nobody pays them any attention or gives them any care, you may require a lot less than these lists.
     
    08-09-2012, 01:32 PM
  #7
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by jillybean19    
I think I'll do what one of my boarding facilities did for a wash rack and put down a rubber mat with holes over gravel for drainage. Seems simple enough and effective! I actually make tack, so I have plenty of halters and leads. (Just recently at a ride someone's horse got loose, so I caught it and had someone grab one of my halter and lead sets for sale at my booth!) I do like the idea of garbage cans, though I prefer plastic for weight. But thank you for the suggestions!
We have a cement pad outdoors (it is Missouri, warm nearly 9 months a year) near solid and sturdy tie fencing.
     
    08-09-2012, 01:35 PM
  #8
Yearling
You will want caribiners for tying to. Those will need to be professionally installed (meaning, not me using my means). We attach caribiners to wood posts in the barn for tying to. ALso, in terms of property, you will want very good solid fencing or tie posts where you plan on doing anything. So if the horse does act like a doofus and pulls back the fence will surely hold.
     
    08-09-2012, 01:39 PM
  #9
Yearling
My horses are currently on about a half acre with shade, but no "real" shelter. All the barn nonsense stuff is more for me than them haha. We'll be moving to Oregon. One of the main reasons we want our own horsey place is so that the "horse time" doesn't take away from "home time", especially since my hubbie doesn't do horses (yet - he says he'll learn to ride next year). They've been left in a pasture before where I did everything for them except feed them, and they're fine. Right now, my friend goes out and cares for them like her own horses, even giving them baths and spraying them down daily with fly spray. I'm learning from her all the extra things I can do since I was raised with horses that stayed out in the pasture until you needed them haha. I'm liking this more involved approach, though :)

Garden hose!! Definitely.
     
    08-09-2012, 01:41 PM
  #10
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by AQHSam    
You will want caribiners for tying to. Those will need to be professionally installed (meaning, not me using my means). We attach caribiners to wood posts in the barn for tying to. ALso, in terms of property, you will want very good solid fencing or tie posts where you plan on doing anything. So if the horse does act like a doofus and pulls back the fence will surely hold.
Depending on the house, we'll be putting in our own tie posts, included in my barn plan. Luckily, I do know my way around fencing for horses.
     

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