What to charge for walking colicky horse? - Page 6
   

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What to charge for walking colicky horse?

This is a discussion on What to charge for walking colicky horse? within the Barn Maintenance forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category

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        10-25-2011, 04:21 PM
      #51
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mls    
    Your choice. Complaining isn't going to make it any easier.
    I don't complain (not that often anyway). Just providing more prospective into the life of a barn owner.
         
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        10-25-2011, 04:35 PM
      #52
    Showing
    Since you only feed once a day, per your FAQ sheet, I'm going to raise the supposition that it's your own fault the boarder's horse colicked.

    What responsible, intelligent BO/BM doesn't feed at LEAST twice a day, since you should have an idea how a horse's digestive system works?

    I don't know about anyone else, but $400.00 month PLUS all the extras you're sticking to your boarders in ridiculous 'fees', is hardly what I'd call inexpensive.

    FYI, mls IS a barn owner with actual boarders, and horses she doesn't seem to mind caring for properly.
         
        10-25-2011, 05:03 PM
      #53
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Speed Racer    
    Since you only feed once a day, per your FAQ sheet, I'm going to raise the supposition that it's your own fault the boarder's horse colicked.

    What responsible, intelligent BO/BM doesn't feed at LEAST twice a day, since you should have an idea how a horse's digestive system works?

    I don't know about anyone else, but $400.00 month PLUS all the extras you're sticking to your boarders in ridiculous 'fees', is hardly what I'd call inexpensive.

    FYI, mls IS a barn owner with actual boarders, and horses she doesn't seem to mind caring for properly.
    Speed Racer - Take a chill pill. You are being rude. Please don't skim over FAQ's and then go off half cocked. I explain how and why I do everything. $400 in my area for what I provide is inexpensive. Please do you're research first. I never said anything about MLS... I'm fully aware that she is a barn owner.
         
        10-25-2011, 06:01 PM
      #54
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by starlinestables    
    They get $5 and their horse taken care of and handled otherwise the only human interaction some of them would get is feeding every day and the farrier every 6 weeks. We groom them, goop up scratch marks, fly spray, bath them, clip them if needed. Students bring them treats...braid they're manes and tails. They also get tuned up by me. Not to mention they get to add lesson horse to their resume if they ever need to be sold.
    Here is the SAME point I brought up in my earlier post. And-this is your second post today referring to all the great extra care the boarder horses get who are used for lessons. As I said earlier, this IS one of the horses you use for lessons. All of a sudden not worth the extra care? Doesn't make sense, and it seems to me that you sort of talk out of both sides of your face on the wonderful extra care they get, when the rubber actually meets the road and they actually are in NEED of something. I am also baffled by you saying you have to walk all over to catch and hold for the farrier-you don;t charge for that? To me that would make MUCH more sense. People can plan ahead, and if they can't be there, they pay.

    PS Just looked at your sight. Your bookeeping has got to be a nightmare! I have never ever seen food priced per lb, nor a limit on shavings. If you are so cost conscious why are you buying bags? Wouldn't loads be cheaper? Your farrier-at least for what I am used to -VERY cheap. And to include catch and hold? Anyway-I have no idea what your market is, but you sure seem to be making your life much more difficult with all of that counting feed and shavings crap. :roll:
         
        10-25-2011, 06:12 PM
      #55
    Trained
    @Starline, I tried to look at your site but couldn't get it to load properly, so guess I can't give you any insight there.

    But I think at this point, you'd be better off just dropping the subject, it's starting to look like no matter what you say to whom someone is going to take offense and will decide you're wrong. BTDT too!
         
        10-25-2011, 07:13 PM
      #56
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by starlinestables    
    When all my stalls are done and full, I will make $16 a head off of boarding.

    One of the things I was surprised to learn when I started coming to this forum was that boarding makes hardly any money. Every time someone asks for advice on starting a boarding stable, that's what they get told. My cousin's boyfriend wanted to do it - until he sat down and crunched the numbers that is. I don't think it would be worth it, myself.
         
        10-25-2011, 07:16 PM
      #57
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by starlinestables    
    We groom them, goop up scratch marks, fly spray, bath them, clip them if needed..

    So you should...after all YOU are using their horse and not having to go out and pay for one.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by starlinestables    
    They also get tuned up by me. Not to mention they get to add lesson horse to their resume if they ever need to be sold.

    As far as this part putting this on a resume to sell a horse.....that would send me running the other way in a hurry.

    A lesson horse to me is LESS valuable than a privately owned one as heaven only know who rode it. Maybe some beginner that ruined it entirely.

    I would also point out and I think I had done so before..I agree with MIE and would never ever want to board at any stable that discusses their boarders,horses or situations on a public horse forum.

    To me that is an invasion of MY privacy.
    MIEventer and Allison Finch like this.
         
        10-25-2011, 07:29 PM
      #58
    Foal
    I've worked for barns from 5 horses to 70, and I've never seen anyone charge for an emergency situation like that. It kind of comes with the territory. I understand you are trying to run a business, but I think you need to take a close look at your pricing. There's nothing wrong with "nickle-and-diming" in theory, it's something I've looked into myself. The problem is that it results in a very rigid system and when presented with "gray area" situations like this, it tends to fall apart. If that's the way you want to do it, then you need to write out every concievable scenario and put a price tag on it. Another problem is with a system like that, boarders may have a tendency to pick and choose what they want to pay for - one of the barns I worked at tried to put in blanketing policy, but it fell apart as many boarders would severely overblanket their horses but not sign up for blanketing, and the BO would remove the blankets to avoid a medical situation but couldn't demand a charge for the work (even if she paid me - she had to take the hit). The only options would have been to walk away and allow the situation to turn into heatstroke or worse, make blanketing/removal mandatory and part of the overall board agreement (include it in the total board price), or simply keep doing it for free.

    That last scenario is why I don't like the "nickle-and-dime" structure. It's fine in a business that doesn't involve living animals but unless you're willing to walk away from a severe medical incident due to a boarder who won't want to pay (and I don't consider that an option, and frankly you may want to consider a non-animal involved business venture if you do), you're going to run into problems (you could do it for free, but lord help you if you charge another boarder down the road for the same thing...) If it is specifically in your board agreement with an estimated price figure (either hourly or other) then fine, but be very careful about coming up with random pricing to difficult scenarios.

    What I would advise is that you look at your finances and how you've determined what to charge for boarding. I've always found boarding works best on a cost-based system, that is cover your costs first - and these costs must be detailed, not just the fixed but the variable costs need to be estimated as well - , as well as your salary and profit margin, and factor in what is charged elsewhere in your area to come to what you charge for board. Things like broken fencing and emergency care factor in as a variable cost - do some homework, look at records, and figure out how much you're paying on average for these things - speak to other BOs and ask how much these things cost them each year. Just like you would set aside money for unexpected vet bills with one horse, you do this for a business as well. Factor an estimated sum for these variable costs and include them in your board - if there is a surplus at the end of the year, put it towards facility improvements, boarder credits, a fun event, whatever. If you've estimated far too much you can adjust accordingly, and if you've had a run of bad luck you're not completely screwed. The key is to cover all costs including your pay and startup debt without creating a price so high that nobody will board there. Unfortunately there is very very little profit in boarding, you are better off trying to break even with the board and hopefully take home a small profit, and making your living with lessons and training.

    If this horse in particular is a constant problem then you need to have a sit down with the owner. A dangerous horse is a dangerous horse and your staff have the right to refuse to handle him - the owner can either train him, pay you or another trainer to train him, negotiate a way to keep him there with minimal handling and an action plan worked out in writing as to what will be done in an emergency situation where he will need to be handled (IE you having authority to call in the vet and authorise treatment up to a certain amount, to agreed upon sum, etc in order to get the horse treated as quickly as possible to minimize handling), or she can find another place to board. In terms of property damage, horses break stuff. I only see it appropriate to charge a boarder for it if it becomes a chronic issue - IE a horse that is underworked/overgrained at the owner's insistence and destroying their stall, or any other issue where the horse is simply causing damage on such a routine basis that special (costly) preventative measures may need to be implemented to deal with that one horse.

    Best of luck with your facility, boarding isn't for the faint of heart and as they say, if you want to make a million dollars with horses, start out with two million
         
        10-25-2011, 08:21 PM
      #59
    Trained
    @ Gremmy-if this horse is "dangerous", I doubt it would be used as a school horse. The behavior Starline has described is nothing more than a bit of bad behavior, which, quite frankly, could most likely be corrected in a very short time by someone who took 5 minutes and a rope halter to teach the horse not to be pushy, which is what it sounds like to me. BReaking a part of the fence-well, could happen to any horse any day.
    Dressage10135 likes this.
         
        10-25-2011, 10:20 PM
      #60
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by starlinestables    
    When all my stalls are done and full, I will make $16 a head off of boarding. I do it because #1 the love of horses and #2 I will make substantially more in 5 years when most of my start up costs are gone. I'm 25 and have $11,000 + in barn bills... a MONTH and that's with building everything ourselves.
    Do you have a business degree or have you taken any business courses? Because it seems to me you should realize that you can't reasonably expect boarders to assume the fixed costs of your improvements, and thus "punish" them for every little transgression, like a sick horse. That's not how the business world works, and that's not how you tally profits or losses.
    DraftXDressage likes this.
         

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