What kind of electric fenceing do you have? - Page 6
 
 

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What kind of electric fenceing do you have?

This is a discussion on What kind of electric fenceing do you have? within the Barn Maintenance forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category

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        03-23-2013, 06:01 PM
      #51
    Weanling
    Manitoba, here. My posts are only 1.5 - 2 feet. Our frostline starts at 4-5 feet, lol. Deeper, in high traffic zones. Try finding posts long enough. During thaws you might be able to wiggle the odd post, but it firms up as soon as the season settles. We haven't had any issues for 6+ years.
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        03-23-2013, 08:23 PM
      #52
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by backyardhorse    
    Although we use the tape (Horseguard, I think), I'm not a fan of it.
    1) Yes, it is highly visible, but the "keys" that actually hold the 2 parts of the insulator together are forever breaking
    2) The winds tend to blow the tape out of the insulators.
    3) Because the conductive wires in the tape itself can break without the plastic web breaking. I've had this happen more than once, hard to find the short!

    It would be my guess that the rope types would hold up better, less resistance to the wind. Horses learn very quickly where their boundaries are, so the visibility is more of an issue to us than it is to them.
    I use the tape like Deserthorsewoman, on top of no climb horse fence & over gates.
    I also wish I had used a hot rope instead as the tape does wear out & has to be replaced at times. I would switch except I have so much invested in the insulators already that it is cheaper to buy the tape when needed.
         
        03-23-2013, 10:20 PM
      #53
    Yearling
    Thanks everyone
         
        03-23-2013, 11:31 PM
      #54
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
    My corner posts aren't real heavy but 5 posts were used to make the L. The uprights were notched then two posts trimmed to fit parallel to the ground. Fence wire was then run from the top of the post to the bottom of the other, going each way. The wire forms an X. Each strand of the X can be tightened. When both sides of the L are done this way the corner is rock solid. Koolio's posts aren't braced and after a few years the corners will start moving in. Because my soil is clay, we put long points on the posts and they were pounded in. Never put flat bottomed or barely pointed posts in as the front will start shoving them out. Long ponts even if augered in then pack wet sand and clay around them and tamp it hard. What you will find if you try to go much lower than 18" is that you hit hard pan which is like cement.
    How long should the points be?
         
        03-30-2013, 12:44 PM
      #55
    Yearling
    Ok if I go with the plain wire, I wanted to leave the 3" posts as line posts and put 4-5" posts (braced) in the corners. Would that set up work for wire? Thanks!
         
        03-30-2013, 01:06 PM
      #56
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by horsecrazygirl13    
    Ok if I go with the plain wire, I wanted to leave the 3" posts as line posts and put 4-5" posts (braced) in the corners. Would that set up work for wire? Thanks!
    I assume you are talking about high tensile wire? If so, this wire needs to be kept tight, so your corners will need to be very strong, so I'd go with heavier 6-8" posts and braces there. I don't have mine braced, but my corner posts are 7-8" and over 3' in the ground on my electric rope fence (which doesn't have to be nearly as tight). The 3" line posts are iffy at best, depending upon how far apart they are. It doesn't take much at all for a horse to back into a 3" post and break it or push it out. The smaller posts will hold your wire in place as long as there is no horizontal tension vetween the wire and the posts. If the posts are out of line even a bit, this could be a problem. At the very minimum, I'd put a heavier 4-5" post every 20-30 feet in addition to the 3" posts, no matter what kind of wire, tape or rope fencing you choose.

    High tensile wire is cheap, but it is a huge pain to work with. If it breaks, it coils like mad (and dangerously) and it is difficult to splice together. You will also need the proper parts to tighten it correctly and need to be sure not to nail it tight to your posts. The wire should be able to slip through the fencing nails, so your line posts must be very straight.
         
        03-30-2013, 02:23 PM
      #57
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Koolio    
    I assume you are talking about high tensile wire? If so, this wire needs to be kept tight, so your corners will need to be very strong, so I'd go with heavier 6-8" posts and braces there. I don't have mine braced, but my corner posts are 7-8" and over 3' in the ground on my electric rope fence (which doesn't have to be nearly as tight). The 3" line posts are iffy at best, depending upon how far apart they are. It doesn't take much at all for a horse to back into a 3" post and break it or push it out. The smaller posts will hold your wire in place as long as there is no horizontal tension vetween the wire and the posts. If the posts are out of line even a bit, this could be a problem. At the very minimum, I'd put a heavier 4-5" post every 20-30 feet in addition to the 3" posts, no matter what kind of wire, tape or rope fencing you choose.

    High tensile wire is cheap, but it is a huge pain to work with. If it breaks, it coils like mad (and dangerously) and it is difficult to splice together. You will also need the proper parts to tighten it correctly and need to be sure not to nail it tight to your posts. The wire should be able to slip through the fencing nails, so your line posts must be very straight.
    Well then, would that set up work for rope?
         
        03-30-2013, 02:33 PM
      #58
    Yearling
    Electric Line Horse Fence - Maxi Braid Electric Line Fencing
    Has anyone tried this kind of rope? How long does it last?
         
        03-30-2013, 07:22 PM
      #59
    Yearling
    This is what our fence looks like now. The 3" posts look pretty sturdy to me. What do you think?
         
        03-31-2013, 11:42 AM
      #60
    Yearling
    I cannot tell how sturdy your posts are from the picture. I can tell how thin they are by the relative size of the insulators. The posts will hold up your fence wires but they won't tolerate much lateral tension without shiftingand loosening. They won't be as sturdy in the ground as thicker posts. You will also find it difficult to hammer in insulators in a thin post as the post will flex quite a lot. I would also be worried about the thinner posts splitting when you nail or screw in your insulators and then not having enough lateral surface area to place the new nails while still keeping your fencing wire fairly level.

    That said, you could still use them if you put in a few extra thicker posts every 20-30 feet or so. With some brands of electric rope or tape, posts can be up to 60 feet apart. This is OK as long as the area is perfectly flat, it if you have any rise or fall of the land, you will need posts in between. This is where your 3" posts could be used.

    As far as the fencing strands themselves, there will be pros and cons to each. The high tensile is terrible to work with and it will cut a horse badly if they get tangled in it. The electric rope will injure a horse as well, but it is much easier to put up properly. Electric tape looks nice when taught, but takes a beating in the wind and requires regular tensioning. You can also get a polymer covered electric wire that looks nice, but it stretches out of shape if a horse leans on it, and like the others will cause injury of the horse gets tangled. Never, ever tie a horse to a thinner post (less than 6") as they can pull a 6" post out of the ground quite easily.

    So the key is this: Use good posts to support your fence, especially in the corners, no matter what you choose. More strands is better, especially at the bottom as this is where horses are more likely to out a foot through. Electrifying a lower strand will discourage this. Use the best insulators you can get. I prefer the screw in type as nails work themselves out. Keep your fence properly tensioned with the proper parts and check it regularly. Rope doesn't need to be as tight and it will stretch in the cold. Wire and coated wire must be very tight. Buy an adequate electric discharge unit for the distance you a fencing. Buy a tester and test the fence regularly. Ground your fence properly using the proper materials. Don't make substitutions here that won't work as well.

    Brand of fencing isn't as important as proper installation. Check the cost, warranties, visibility, tensile strength and conductivity if you want to compare vrands, but no matter what, use the appropriate parts and purchase something you can easily maintain yourself and buy a little extra for repairs, etc.

    Not sure what other advice I can give you, other than "happy building"!
         

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