What kind of electric fenceing do you have? - Page 7
 
 

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What kind of electric fenceing do you have?

This is a discussion on What kind of electric fenceing do you have? within the Barn Maintenance forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category

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        04-02-2013, 12:00 AM
      #61
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Koolio    
    I cannot tell how sturdy your posts are from the picture. I can tell how thin they are by the relative size of the insulators. The posts will hold up your fence wires but they won't tolerate much lateral tension without shiftingand loosening. They won't be as sturdy in the ground as thicker posts. You will also find it difficult to hammer in insulators in a thin post as the post will flex quite a lot. I would also be worried about the thinner posts splitting when you nail or screw in your insulators and then not having enough lateral surface area to place the new nails while still keeping your fencing wire fairly level.

    That said, you could still use them if you put in a few extra thicker posts every 20-30 feet or so. With some brands of electric rope or tape, posts can be up to 60 feet apart. This is OK as long as the area is perfectly flat, it if you have any rise or fall of the land, you will need posts in between. This is where your 3" posts could be used.

    As far as the fencing strands themselves, there will be pros and cons to each. The high tensile is terrible to work with and it will cut a horse badly if they get tangled in it. The electric rope will injure a horse as well, but it is much easier to put up properly. Electric tape looks nice when taught, but takes a beating in the wind and requires regular tensioning. You can also get a polymer covered electric wire that looks nice, but it stretches out of shape if a horse leans on it, and like the others will cause injury of the horse gets tangled. Never, ever tie a horse to a thinner post (less than 6") as they can pull a 6" post out of the ground quite easily.

    So the key is this: Use good posts to support your fence, especially in the corners, no matter what you choose. More strands is better, especially at the bottom as this is where horses are more likely to out a foot through. Electrifying a lower strand will discourage this. Use the best insulators you can get. I prefer the screw in type as nails work themselves out. Keep your fence properly tensioned with the proper parts and check it regularly. Rope doesn't need to be as tight and it will stretch in the cold. Wire and coated wire must be very tight. Buy an adequate electric discharge unit for the distance you a fencing. Buy a tester and test the fence regularly. Ground your fence properly using the proper materials. Don't make substitutions here that won't work as well.

    Brand of fencing isn't as important as proper installation. Check the cost, warranties, visibility, tensile strength and conductivity if you want to compare vrands, but no matter what, use the appropriate parts and purchase something you can easily maintain yourself and buy a little extra for repairs, etc.

    Not sure what other advice I can give you, other than "happy building"!
    Thanks Koolio! I think I'll get rope then. If I brace the corners like I posted earlier(without the concrete though), would 5" posts be good enough for the corners? I was thinking of putting 4-5" posts in between the thin posts(the thin posts are 20 feet apart) so would that be ok? I was also thinking of getting some electric rope from cameo fencing(I posted a link) has anyone had any experience with that brand? Thanx
         
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        04-02-2013, 10:42 AM
      #62
    Foal
    Hard to tell from pic. They do look somewhat level. BTW : A good poor boys fence level is a good rifle scope. Preferatly mounted on a 2 x4.

    Boone
         
        04-03-2013, 03:42 PM
      #63
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rawhide    
    Hard to tell from pic. They do look somewhat level. BTW : A good poor boys fence level is a good rifle scope. Preferatly mounted on a 2 x4.

    Boone
    What exactly do you mean by level posts? Would the set up I described (below) work for rope? Thanks again.

    I think I'll get rope then. If I brace the corners like I posted earlier(without the concrete though), would 5" posts be good enough for the corners? I was thinking of putting 4-5" posts in between the thin posts(the thin posts are 20 feet apart) so would that be ok? I was also thinking of getting some electric rope from cameo fencing(I posted a link) has anyone had any experience with that brand?
         
        04-03-2013, 08:19 PM
      #64
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by horsecrazygirl13    
    What exactly do you mean by level posts? Would the set up I described (below) work for rope? Thanks again.

    I think I'll get rope then. If I brace the corners like I posted earlier(without the concrete though), would 5" posts be good enough for the corners? I was thinking of putting 4-5" posts in between the thin posts(the thin posts are 20 feet apart) so would that be ok? I was also thinking of getting some electric rope from cameo fencing(I posted a link) has anyone had any experience with that brand?
    As long as you brace the corners well, in both directions, you should be able to get away with 5" posts. For bracing, put a second post about 4' from your corner post and run a 2x4 or section of round fence rail in the inside between the corner post and this second post. Then use a longer 2x4 or round rail to go from the upper part of the corner post to the bottom of the second post. Basically you will have a giant number 7 between the corner and the second post. You will need to do the same on the other side.

    Adding 4-5" posts between your 3" posts will be fine. You may even get away with spacing them between every other 3" post, depending on the distance. Do make sure they make a straight line by setting a string down the inside of your fence line, touching the 3" posts. Be sure to put your larger posts just on the outside of that string, so your line stays straight.
    horsecrazygirl13 likes this.
         
        04-05-2013, 03:19 PM
      #65
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Koolio    
    As long as you brace the corners well, in both directions, you should be able to get away with 5" posts. For bracing, put a second post about 4' from your corner post and run a 2x4 or section of round fence rail in the inside between the corner post and this second post. Then use a longer 2x4 or round rail to go from the upper part of the corner post to the bottom of the second post. Basically you will have a giant number 7 between the corner and the second post. You will need to do the same on the other side.

    Adding 4-5" posts between your 3" posts will be fine. You may even get away with spacing them between every other 3" post, depending on the distance. Do make sure they make a straight line by setting a string down the inside of your fence line, touching the 3" posts. Be sure to put your larger posts just on the outside of that string, so your line stays straight.
    Would this kind of bracing work for 5" posts too?


    You mean put a thicker post every 40'? Our small posts are 20' apart.
         
        04-06-2013, 06:02 PM
      #66
    Yearling
    bump
         
        04-06-2013, 06:21 PM
      #67
    Foal
    [QUOTE=horsecrazygirl13;2116906]What exactly do you mean by level posts? Would the set up I described (below) work for rope? Thanks again.


    Sorry just saw this : Meant it in good way post looked lined up (level) at least from pic. As far as bottoms like someone else said hard to tell from pic (snow).

    Boone
         
        04-06-2013, 09:54 PM
      #68
    Showing
    Horsecrazy, go to youtube and see how fencing is done there. My corners use 5 posts, 3 form an L, the other two run parallel to the ground, with notches cut in the uprights, then wire forms an X and are twisted as tight as possible and then some. Those line posts you have are fine. To prevent the wire going down, every three or four posts tie the wire at the insulator with plastic bale twine. Put a fence staple on the back of the post. Should the insulator break the twine will hold the wire up. Wire is the best to stay with, any fencing pro will tell you that. The others are for fencing inside the perimeter fencing.
         
        04-07-2013, 12:46 AM
      #69
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
    Horsecrazy, go to youtube and see how fencing is done there. My corners use 5 posts, 3 form an L, the other two run parallel to the ground, with notches cut in the uprights, then wire forms an X and are twisted as tight as possible and then some. Those line posts you have are fine. To prevent the wire going down, every three or four posts tie the wire at the insulator with plastic bale twine. Put a fence staple on the back of the post. Should the insulator break the twine will hold the wire up. Wire is the best to stay with, any fencing pro will tell you that. The others are for fencing inside the perimeter fencing.
    How many wires are needed? This is for a paddock.
         
        04-07-2013, 10:16 AM
      #70
    Showing
    A single wire will do for a turnout when there's no snow. The horses need to touch the dirt. My single wire is used only during the day, after the snow has gone. About suppertime I put them in behind more secure fencing.
         

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