Is Barrel Racing Hard to learn?
   

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Is Barrel Racing Hard to learn?

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  • Is barrel racing hard to learn?
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    03-14-2013, 10:18 AM
  #1
Foal
Is Barrel Racing Hard to learn?

Hey I've started getting riding lessons etc. And want too look into a different sort of riding and was wondering how hard it was to learn Barrel riding ?
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    03-14-2013, 10:31 AM
  #2
Yearling
Where to begin.

YES and NO. Barrel racing can be as easy or as hard as you make it! A lot of us have worked very hard to get where we're at. Lots of blood, sweat, tears and naughty horses, maybe great ones too.

First and foremost, I'd advise you seek a trainer that specializes in barrel racing. Also, in your area if you have someone that gives barrel lessons, maybe take a few and see if it's something you'd really like to do. I know spring's up and coming in my area, lots of shows coming around. Go watch! See those great runs, the meltdowns, the falls, the wins. It's a lot of work, but SO worth it.

Barrel racing requires you to be a good rider! Some gals and guys ride "daddie's money" meaning they ride the finished horses, but can't ride themselves. In any sport you have that, and you just work harder and strive to be better! I know I always have! Money can't buy you those earned wins. You have so many elements speed, agility, the lead changes, balance, good horsemanship. It's definitley something you can get started on, but take it SLOW. It's not something to jump into overnight, a few days, or weeks, it takes months even years to get yourself and your horse polished.

Check out this thread, all the HF barrel racers have contributed a lot and it was started by Drum!

Barrel Racing Exercises and Drills.

Good luck.
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    03-14-2013, 10:46 AM
  #3
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annanoel    
Where to begin.

YES and NO. Barrel racing can be as easy or as hard as you make it! A lot of us have worked very hard to get where we're at. Lots of blood, sweat, tears and naughty horses, maybe great ones too.

First and foremost, I'd advise you seek a trainer that specializes in barrel racing. Also, in your area if you have someone that gives barrel lessons, maybe take a few and see if it's something you'd really like to do. I know spring's up and coming in my area, lots of shows coming around. Go watch! See those great runs, the meltdowns, the falls, the wins. It's a lot of work, but SO worth it.

Barrel racing requires you to be a good rider! Some gals and guys ride "daddie's money" meaning they ride the finished horses, but can't ride themselves. In any sport you have that, and you just work harder and strive to be better! I know I always have! Money can't buy you those earned wins. You have so many elements speed, agility, the lead changes, balance, good horsemanship. It's definitley something you can get started on, but take it SLOW. It's not something to jump into overnight, a few days, or weeks, it takes months even years to get yourself and your horse polished.

Check out this thread, all the HF barrel racers have contributed a lot and it was started by Drum!

Barrel Racing Exercises and Drills.

Good luck.
lol okay thanks so where about would I start without a trainer? Like is there anything I can start off with without a trainer ?
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    03-14-2013, 10:55 AM
  #4
Yearling
Well if you're going to get serious, then I'd say start with a trainer. For now though, you can just set them up and goof around. That's how I started then went to a few fun shows, realized how much was involved and started taking lessons and building on that with my trainer. So just give it a go, then if you really love it and get hooked get a trainer, sorry for repeating that. It's just very easy to sour a horse without proper guidance and taking it SLOW. If you're just messing around and trying it out though, it's fine! Especially if you have other riding you're doing, not just running barrels. Groundwork is always great too before starting anything like this. You want to make sure you have a respectful, level-headed horse before you enter the arena.

This is the pattern and the measurements so you can set some barrels up and give it a try. Watch some of the videos on the other thread too! They give some beginner pointers, advice and so on. Have fun! (:


This is a pattern I used, with the help of my trainer, now on my own to practice. It's not necessarily any pattern you'll ever run but helps you get the feel of turning when you start and setting up for the next barrel.



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    03-14-2013, 11:24 AM
  #5
Foal
Alright thanks what ground work should I do with him ? I was told he has done barrels before nothing serious though just at some pony club days and stuff thanks ill try find some barrels too use then to get used to the turning of it etc. Thanks heaps for your help can you also add me please :) would love to pm yaa :)
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    03-14-2013, 11:33 AM
  #6
Green Broke
Annanoel and I usually just repeat each other, LOL.

I said this in the Sticky that DrumRunner started, but the things that you can do now are just making sure your horse respects you and listens to you.

That means doing ground work exercises. My favorite clinician is Clinton Anderson simply because he explains everything in precise detail about what he is doing, why, and when. But it's as simple as NEVER letting your horse get into your person bubble. Never letting the horse step in front of you or drag you around on the lead rope. Being able to move different parts of your horse's body with ease.

Yes, this video is a trailer loading video. But if you keep watching, CA gets into lunging-type ground work exercises you can do to gain the respect of your horse.



And in general for riding, you just want them broke broke broke. I've got a reply on that Sticky thread that explains just that!
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    03-14-2013, 11:43 AM
  #7
Foal
Ohk thanks Beau Jasper doesn't drag me by the leadrope he's very laid back and I can pick his feet up easily just sometimes he steps on me and can get ontop of me and im not sure how to stop that... And when he's eating he seems to try blocking me off so he can get his food and he steps on me and the other day he was an inch off kicking me in the ribs but im not entirely sure how too stop him from doing these things... Your help would be much appreciated :) thanks
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    03-14-2013, 11:55 AM
  #8
Yearling
Shenee- I definitley wouldn't be starting barrels then TBH. He doesn't view you as a leader and does not respect your space. My gelding respects me as a leader to the point where I can give him a look and change my body language and he knows what I want.

You need to be the dominant leader with your horse. Kicking is and should NEVER be acceptable. When I'm working with a horse from the ground, whether my own or another. Doesn't matter! They should stand respectfully away from me and they should not come into MY space unless I ask. That's because they should be taught to stay out of my personal space, and not to approach me without permission. I like the way Clinton describes it. "My personal space is defined by a large, imaginary hula hoop, the edge of which is about six feet away from me in every direction."

I purposely go in my geldings stall when he eats here and there. I want him to be relaxed, and to listen if I ask. Periodically, when it happens I take him away from his food and ride if the DH happens to get home early. He best not misbehave, he should be respectful and fine with me in his stall and taking him away from his food.

Lunge him for respect, work him on the ground. Parelli 7 games are also great to play to establish respect. Don't get frustrated this takes time, as does everything with horses.
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    03-14-2013, 12:00 PM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annanoel    
Shenee- I definitley wouldn't be starting barrels then TBH. He doesn't view you as a leader and does not respect your space. My gelding respects me as a leader to the point where I can give him a look and change my body language and he knows what I want.

You need to be the dominant leader with your horse. Kicking is and should NEVER be acceptable. When I'm working with a horse from the ground, whether my own or another. Doesn't matter! They should stand respectfully away from me and they should not come into MY space unless I ask. That's because they should be taught to stay out of my personal space, and not to approach me without permission. I like the way Clinton describes it. "My personal space is defined by a large, imaginary hula hoop, the edge of which is about six feet away from me in every direction."

I purposely go in my geldings stall when he eats here and there. I want him to be relaxed, and to listen if I ask. Periodically, when it happens I take him away from his food and ride if the DH happens to get home early. He best not misbehave, he should be respectful and fine with me in his stall and taking him away from his food.

Lunge him for respect, work him on the ground. Parelli 7 games are also great to play to establish respect. Don't get frustrated this takes time, as does everything with horses.
ok so how would I get him too view me as his leader ? And how would I stop him from kicking me ?? Also how do I play this game you speak of ? Thanks heaps for you help :)
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    03-14-2013, 12:02 PM
  #10
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annanoel    
Shenee- I definitley wouldn't be starting barrels then TBH. He doesn't view you as a leader and does not respect your space. My gelding respects me as a leader to the point where I can give him a look and change my body language and he knows what I want.

You need to be the dominant leader with your horse. Kicking is and should NEVER be acceptable. When I'm working with a horse from the ground, whether my own or another. Doesn't matter! They should stand respectfully away from me and they should not come into MY space unless I ask. That's because they should be taught to stay out of my personal space, and not to approach me without permission. I like the way Clinton describes it. "My personal space is defined by a large, imaginary hula hoop, the edge of which is about six feet away from me in every direction."

I purposely go in my geldings stall when he eats here and there. I want him to be relaxed, and to listen if I ask. Periodically, when it happens I take him away from his food and ride if the DH happens to get home early. He best not misbehave, he should be respectful and fine with me in his stall and taking him away from his food.

Lunge him for respect, work him on the ground. Parelli 7 games are also great to play to establish respect. Don't get frustrated this takes time, as does everything with horses.
ok thanks heaps how would I teach him to respect me and see me as his leader? Also how would I stop him from kicking me? And how do I play this game you speak of ?

Thanks heaps
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