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Extreme beginner to barrel wanting to be pro someday

This is a discussion on Extreme beginner to barrel wanting to be pro someday within the Barrel Racing forums, part of the Western Riding category

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        04-26-2013, 10:41 PM
      #11
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Aesthetic    
    My horse isn't ruined? Then again, I guess it all depends on the horse and how much help you get. I got a lot of help from other riders around me, but the people who gave lesson were very, uptight. They shunned my mare because she was a lazy bag of fat after she foaled. -.-
    There are always exceptions. Especially when your dealing with an easy-going horse. I nearly ruined my mare when I was 14 because I thought I knew everything. I had a seasoned horse, and then the mare in training. She was pushed too hard, too fast.

    Maturity is what is going to train a good barrel horse. It takes about 2 year to have a finished barrel horse to compete on. 2 Years. That isn't an exaggeration. It takes patience, commitment, time and more patience.

    I've been racing for over a decade, and still take lessons. My riding can ALWAYS improve. I'm constantly looking at ways to improve my patterns and ways to train and make my horses better. One day you will realize you aren't the best and you can always do better. Just when you think your on top, your horse will dump you, or you'll get beat by someone that's better. And there is always someone that's better.

    Find a trainer that specializes in barrel racing. They'll break it down for you, make sure you have the basics down before ever seeing a pattern. There's a lot more to running the pattern then just going fast and turning. Pockets, rating, when to change leads, what YOU should do in the saddle, etc.
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        04-26-2013, 10:43 PM
      #12
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by waresbear    
    Aesthetic, you are a gifted, talented rider, and unfortunately, in the small minority. Most who start out on their own with no idea of what to do, other than run the horse around a can, end up being a mess.
    Thank You, I took much needed advice and did nothing but trot for I don't know how long. Then again I started out in a "Step Up" arena, where you start riding as a little kid and progress until you're ready for larger rodeos. That's where most people went to train their horses, had nothing to be ashamed of if you had alleyway problems, got thrown, hit a barrel, or looked ridiculous on a little green horse haha. But thank you for that comment. Especially people who believe a horse can run barrels without a day of training is what is a mess.
         
        04-26-2013, 10:46 PM
      #13
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CLaPorte432    
    There are always exceptions. Especially when your dealing with an easy-going horse. I nearly ruined my mare when I was 14 because I thought I knew everything. I had a seasoned horse, and then the mare in training. She was pushed too hard, too fast.

    Maturity is what is going to train a good barrel horse. It takes about 2 year to have a finished barrel horse to compete on. 2 Years. That isn't an exaggeration. It takes patience, commitment, time and more patience.

    I've been racing for over a decade, and still take lessons. My riding can ALWAYS improve. I'm constantly looking at ways to improve my patterns and ways to train and make my horses better. One day you will realize you aren't the best and you can always do better. Just when you think your on top, your horse will dump you, or you'll get beat by someone that's better. And there is always someone that's better.

    Find a trainer that specializes in barrel racing. They'll break it down for you, make sure you have the basics down before ever seeing a pattern. There's a lot more to running the pattern then just going fast and turning. Pockets, rating, when to change leads, what YOU should do in the saddle, etc.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    I have a woman who runs with me at rodeos, most mistake her as rude because she's straight forward about your problems. She's always helped me. Yes, my mare is extremely laid back../was/ in the pattern. Probably why is was so easy for us to teach each other. You have no idea how right you are on the time part. It took me almost 4 years to get her to where she is now, and she is NO WHERE near finished. I've been barrel racing maybe... 11 years? Or less? And boy when I started on that mare, I looked like the biggest fool out there.
         
        04-26-2013, 10:47 PM
      #14
    Yearling
    As for my advice, for sure don't even listen to it haha, I took the hard way out. Listen to these guys, they got it down.
         
        04-27-2013, 03:51 AM
      #15
    Started
    I would suggest going to some NBHA-type events and talking to people. Watch how they ride and how they take care of their horses. Watch how the horses act outside the pen.

    Shows like that are a good way to find trainers and horses. I would look for a finished horse to lease or buy for a first barrel horse. The reason is that, trainer or not, you will learn a million times more if you can feel how it's supposed to be from the beginning. The first horse you get doesn't have to be smoking fast, either. You have plenty of time to upgrade when you're ready. I've met more than one person who were scared off of barrels because they were over horsed.

    If you want to go pro eventually, having a trainer will serve several purposes.
    1. Your riding will improve at a faster pace than when you are self-taught.
    2. You will have the benefit of learning from someone else's mistakes (and we've all made some doozies!).
    3. With the right trainer, you will have the opportunity to ride multiple horses, which will also teach you a great deal.
    4. You will learn a lot of little things that you would never think of on your own.

    Let us know how it goes.
         
        04-28-2013, 08:35 PM
      #16
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JungleJulia    
    New to the forum and barrel racing. This was a sport I've wanted to get into six years ago but instead did english (hunter/jumper). I rode, believe it or not, six days a week. I was obsessed with riding and becoming a better rider. Haven't ridden in six years but haven't forgotten what I learned either. I will be doing a rider eval tomorrow (yay!)
    Well welcome!

    First, I will advise you to check out the barrel racing sticky on this forum.
    Barrel Racing Exercises and Drills.

    It's got lots of great information for beginner barrel racers. That's why we created it.

    There are some big difference between riding a hunter/jumper than barrel racing, so be prepared to learn different ways to do the same thing. I know this, because I myself took some hunter/jumper lessons in December, and I had some interesting discussions with my instructor (also helping her to understand barrel racing more!) The way you use your reins, body, legs, weight, etc will all be slightly different because you are no longer heading straight for a jump and making gradual round circles .... you are running full kilter, and making a 8-foot turn around a barrel. Different dynamics!!



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JungleJulia    
    1. What is with joining an association? I don't understand what the associations are for.
    Associations are not necessary that you join. But they are often what put on barrel racing events.

    For example, the professionals are members of the Women's Professional Rodeo Association. They must go to WPRA sanctioned events in order to earn money to qualify for the National Finals Rodeo.

    Another example (in the extreme opposite) is a small local association that puts on a barrel racing series where you compete every 2 weeks. Points are kept and the winners at the end of the series can win extra prizes. But you've got to be a member to get prizes.

    So you don't have to be a member of any association, but that's just where you will find a lot of barrel races.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JungleJulia    
    2. I'm trying out some stables to see which I like best to start with. I know I will be using school horses but when I get to a level like loping and doing like an absolute begginers' competition, will I use a school horse?
    If your instructor is a good one, they will put you on a FINISHED barrel racing horse. If they don't, go find a different trainer.

    You will have enough to learn as the RIDER. You don't need to try to deal with the horse at this point. That's why you should be on a finished barrel horse, because the horse already knows his job and can help you learn.

    Whether or not you use a school horse for competitions will depend on your agreement with your trainer. Some will let you take the school horse to a competition (or maybe bring the horse for you). And some won't. So it will depend on your situation.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JungleJulia    
    3. I don't own a horse at all sadly enough. Would it be possible to later lease or horse or would it be better to eventually buy a barrel racing horse?
    Many barrel racers lease their horse. And it often is a wonderful idea when you are just starting out.

    A FINISHED barrel horse (which you NEED to have for minimum of a few years while you learn the ropes) is not cheap to come by. Even if it isn't the fastest horse winning everything, there will still be a good price tag on the horse. This is also why leasing a horse is a good option, before buying.

    But just remember to take it one step at a time. Take lessons first. Don't think about leasing or buying until you are truly ready. (Don't buy the cart before the horse!)

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JungleJulia    
    4. When barrel racing, is it a requirement to ride/race solely in a western saddle? I have tried some aussie saddles (they even have hybrid western/aussie saddles) and like the feel of them.
    Most barrel races do not have any rules on the tack you can or cannot use. So technically, you could race barrels in an aussie saddle.

    However, would you go play a game of basketball, while wearing football cleets? NO. Because it's not the proper equipment.

    Same thing where if you are truly serious about barrel racing, then you should get a barrel saddle. They are specially designed to help the rider complete a barrel racing run.

    So you can start out with whatever, but if you want to get serious, then you need to buy a barrel saddle. (You don't see the NFR girls riding in anything but!)

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JungleJulia    
    5. What is gymkhana? Is it like an extension of barrel racing or some sort of precursor to it?
    Gymkhana basically means "games on horseback". They will have a variety of speed events, and non-speed events. They often will include barrels and poles.

    Here's a few examples:

    Hangman's Race



    Flag Race



    Ring Race



    KeyHole



    Sack Race

         
        04-29-2013, 12:03 AM
      #17
    Green Broke
    I'd also add on gymkhana the events will vary on where you are. I started out in gymkhana an it is a great way to start out. Cheaper and not so competitive more of a relaxing fun day type thing.
         

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