Getting the Out of Shape Barrel Horse Back To Work (Tons of Questions) - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Western Riding > Barrel Racing

Getting the Out of Shape Barrel Horse Back To Work (Tons of Questions)

This is a discussion on Getting the Out of Shape Barrel Horse Back To Work (Tons of Questions) within the Barrel Racing forums, part of the Western Riding category

    Like Tree4Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        05-17-2013, 11:52 PM
      #11
    Yearling
    Dang that is one long shanked highport. I wouldnt throw that in horses mouth unless he was running everything over. I wouldnt risk tearing his mouth up. That's to much step up too fast. That's a very nice way to ask a horse to rear with you. Personally I like the bottom bit you posted. Around here I have talked to many trainers and one in particulat uses o-rings on every horse. He takes the nuttiest of brats and can calm them down to sprint a pattern in an o-ring
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        05-19-2013, 01:59 PM
      #12
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Aesthetic    
    Dang that is one long shanked highport. I wouldnt throw that in horses mouth unless he was running everything over. I wouldnt risk tearing his mouth up. That's to much step up too fast. that's a very nice way to ask a horse to rear with you. Personally I like the bottom bit you posted. Around here I have talked to many trainers and one in particulat uses o-rings on every horse. He takes the nuttiest of brats and can calm them down to sprint a pattern in an o-ring
    Yea, if you put that bit in the hands of someone who doesn't know what they are doing with it. Hence why I specifically said to enlist the help of a trainer to soften his horse and get him to accept a bit (provided his teeth are fine). ANY BIT that isn't used properly is just asking the horse to misbehave, including rearing. And I don't think you should wait to correct the problem until the horse is "running everyone over". That's way too late.

    I was riding my horse Red mostly in a snaffle or a Wonder bit before I took him to this trainer. Pretty mild stuff. But I was having to PULL on him to get a reponse. And the trainer I took him to slapped that high port on him. And he is SO SOFT now. It is amazing. He bends and flexes beautifully, and stays nice and relaxed. All with just the slight lift of the reins.

    No, that high port isn't going to be for every horse. But neither is an O-ring snaffle. You've got to match the bit to the horse.

    I posted the ported bits because they are working fantastic for my horse. I would have NEVER tried those bits on my own. But I got help from someone who knows what they are doing and showed me techniques to keep him soft, and he's doing great. And he would never have gotten there in an O-ring snaffle. Wouldn't work for him.

    And really, the shanks are not that long on either of the ported ones I posted. Not a short shank, no, but they are pretty standard "normal" length.

    The bit doesn't "tear a horse's mouth up". The hands holding the reins do.
    aforred likes this.
         
        05-19-2013, 02:12 PM
      #13
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by beau159    
    Yea, if you put that bit in the hands of someone who doesn't know what they are doing with it. Hence why I specifically said to enlist the help of a trainer to soften his horse and get him to accept a bit (provided his teeth are fine). ANY BIT that isn't used properly is just asking the horse to misbehave, including rearing. And I don't think you should wait to correct the problem until the horse is "running everyone over". That's way too late.

    I was riding my horse Red mostly in a snaffle or a Wonder bit before I took him to this trainer. Pretty mild stuff. But I was having to PULL on him to get a reponse. And the trainer I took him to slapped that high port on him. And he is SO SOFT now. It is amazing. He bends and flexes beautifully, and stays nice and relaxed. All with just the slight lift of the reins.

    No, that high port isn't going to be for every horse. But neither is an O-ring snaffle. You've got to match the bit to the horse.

    I posted the ported bits because they are working fantastic for my horse. I would have NEVER tried those bits on my own. But I got help from someone who knows what they are doing and showed me techniques to keep him soft, and he's doing great. And he would never have gotten there in an O-ring snaffle. Wouldn't work for him.

    And really, the shanks are not that long on either of the ported ones I posted. Not a short shank, no, but they are pretty standard "normal" length.

    The bit doesn't "tear a horse's mouth up". The hands holding the reins do.
    Anyone used to using hard hands on a horses mouth is going to have a problem adjusting to the light touch to a harsh bit. I use a wonder bit on my mare, and I honestly should have never let a certain someone ride her in that bit, because before that someone rode her she had a beautiful response. Now that lovely response is gone. She no longer stops. I'm very anti-port and long shanks, I've seen to many horses wind up with sore and bruised mouths around my area, I try to keep it minimum. Now you are definitely right when it comes to the people holding the reins, but I'd never tell someone to slap a high-port in any horses mouth. Even if just training. A lot of horses get ruined that way.
         
        05-20-2013, 08:27 AM
      #14
    Foal
    Thanks for the replies.

    He is soft in the mouth and has no problem with bits. It is pressure on his nose and jaw that he has an issue with. He's fine with halters as long as they fit right and are adjusted correctly. Therefore, I don't really see the point of a bit with a high port like that. Working with a trainer isn't really an option for me. There aren't many trainers around my area and what ones are here are mainly english, gaited, or some backyard "trainer" who doesn't really know what they are doing. Most people around here have the "train-your-own" mentality, so not much in the way of trainers.

    I know for a fact that I need to pick up a pair of bit guards regardless. Would the velcro/button type ones that open be the only option for a bit like a jr cowhorse or tender touch? Or can you manage to stretch the all rubber ones enough to fit over the complete shank of the bit?

    As far as the bit goes, what type of mouth do you think would be best? I know he doesn't need anything like a twisted wire or other harsh mouth. Which do y'all prefer: 2-piece or 3-piece mouth?
         
        05-20-2013, 09:27 AM
      #15
    Green Broke
    Well I drove 3 hours round trip to get to this most recent trainer I just used for Red, so they certainly aren't all just right around the corner.

    I use the velcro-type bit guards that Aethetic posted on all my gag-type bits. I personally don't like the rubber ones.

    I prefer 3-piece mouths on bits, because you can get the "nutcracker effect" with 2-piece mouths. But of course, each horse is going to be different.

    What do you have on the snaffle you currently ride him in? 2-piece or 3-piece?
    Aesthetic likes this.
         
        05-20-2013, 10:48 PM
      #16
    Foal
    It's a two-piece, but I prefer the three-piece as well for the same reason. My Jr Cowhorse is a 3-piece. I wish I could find an inexpensive 3-piece snaffle.
         
        05-21-2013, 10:25 AM
      #17
    Green Broke
    I guess bits are one of those things I don't mind splurging on because when I buy a bit, I plan on having it hang in my tack room for many years to come, so I want it to last.

    Nothing necessarily wrong with a "cheap" bit but cheap is what cheap does.
         
        05-21-2013, 10:31 AM
      #18
    Green Broke
    I've got this bit for my "go to" snaffle. It really wasn't that expensive, but not $10 either.

    Reinsman Dogbone Copper Roller Snaffle O-Ring Bit - Statelinetack.com
         
        06-06-2013, 04:08 AM
      #19
    Foal
    Concernment.

    I really don't know if this is even in the right topic area. But, my gelding is 6 years this year, he put on ALOT of weight in the winter making it difficult for me to get him back into shape and didn't help it was flat out downpouring until June... My horse, Ninit, named after his father. He seems a little stiff to walk once in awhile and is also foundered in the neck, he eats, drinks and everything just fine. His feet are due for a trimming on the 7th of June. Could it just be his slightly long hooves that are causing his discomfort? I'm really continuing his workout progress into gaming events, even if it means riding around in the open fields alone... I've been at it for over 6 days since I was finally able to start at the begining of June unfortunately. Even after 6 days before his hooves started growing longer each day.

    I've read the previous topics about getting a horse back into shape, but there are no hills on my part of the countryside, and nowhere to really ride besides out in a flat circle out in the pastures. About 3-5 acres. He hasn't gotten any special treats since I'm trying to help get rid of his founder, after the workout, I cool him off, brush, play with him for awhile and let him go back to his own activities. After about each hour I let him go to the water troft and drink the cool water that's clean (until the dog decides to jump in it...)

    I guess my main question is, will his continued workouts help with his founder problem too as well as getting him back into his former shape, he's a morgan/arab and strawberry roan color. Is there anything else I'm missing?
         
        06-06-2013, 10:55 AM
      #20
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by KimRipp    
    I really don't know if this is even in the right topic area. But, my gelding is 6 years this year, he put on ALOT of weight in the winter making it difficult for me to get him back into shape and didn't help it was flat out downpouring until June... My horse, Ninit, named after his father. He seems a little stiff to walk once in awhile and is also foundered in the neck, he eats, drinks and everything just fine. His feet are due for a trimming on the 7th of June. Could it just be his slightly long hooves that are causing his discomfort? I'm really continuing his workout progress into gaming events, even if it means riding around in the open fields alone... I've been at it for over 6 days since I was finally able to start at the begining of June unfortunately. Even after 6 days before his hooves started growing longer each day.

    I've read the previous topics about getting a horse back into shape, but there are no hills on my part of the countryside, and nowhere to really ride besides out in a flat circle out in the pastures. About 3-5 acres. He hasn't gotten any special treats since I'm trying to help get rid of his founder, after the workout, I cool him off, brush, play with him for awhile and let him go back to his own activities. After about each hour I let him go to the water troft and drink the cool water that's clean (until the dog decides to jump in it...)

    I guess my main question is, will his continued workouts help with his founder problem too as well as getting him back into his former shape, he's a morgan/arab and strawberry roan color. Is there anything else I'm missing?
    I think you should start your own thread, instead of using SayiWont's thread, because you have some completely different issues going on.

    What do you mean he "foundered in the neck"? Horses founder in their feet; not other body parts. Did you mean he has a cresty neck?

    If he's stiff and lame, you need to get him to a vet. If he has indeed foundered, you are going to need to start taking care of his diet needs differently and possibly look into corrective shoeing. Yes, exercise is an important part of managing founder (laminitis) along with diet, but like I said, you need to have your horse checked by a vet who is familiar with laminitis.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    How to get a horse back into shape? That One Chick Horse Training 6 04-21-2012 04:15 PM
    I know there are tons of questions about this, but i need help with senior horse Rachel1786 Horse Nutrition 3 01-03-2011 08:15 PM
    back in shape and trainer questions BarrelracingArabian Horse Talk 0 10-17-2010 04:51 PM
    Getting a horse back in shape Solon Horse Talk 3 02-16-2010 11:39 AM
    Getting a horse back in shape Horsegal16 Horse Training 5 01-09-2010 01:34 AM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:06 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0