How to tell if its a 1d 2d 3d or 4d
   

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How to tell if its a 1d 2d 3d or 4d

This is a discussion on How to tell if its a 1d 2d 3d or 4d within the Barrel Racing forums, part of the Western Riding category
  • What is 1d and 2d in horses
  • What is the difference between a 1d and 4d barrel horse

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    11-10-2011, 08:18 PM
  #1
Foal
How to tell if its a 1d 2d 3d or 4d

Im just getting into barrels. Do you have to enter in one or just ride in barrel racing and they tell you if your in 1d? Im so lost with that!! And advice would help! Thanks!!
     
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    11-10-2011, 09:00 PM
  #2
Trained
Each run at each show is going to be different. It is all based off the fastest run for that class that day. So it will change each time depending on who runs and how fast they run.
     
    11-11-2011, 12:11 AM
  #3
Banned
PLS explain the 1-D 2-D 3-D 4-D
     
    11-11-2011, 12:33 AM
  #4
Yearling
And I wouldn't necessarily hope on a 1D can eater. Even if you can handle high speed turns, that horse will WHIP you out of that saddle, even if you have a solid seat. If you're comfortable loping tight turns, you could try a 3D-4D horse. Just as the horse has to learn the pattern, YOU have to too.

You could possibly look for automatic and steady. Something that's been to a few rodeos.
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    11-11-2011, 08:30 AM
  #5
Weanling
Seriously....its not that hard to keep your seat....especially depending on your horses turn style. I HS Rodeoed on a 1D horse with snappy turns. She was bottom of the 1D.....no problem to sit a turn on as long as you were balanced and had a grip on your saddle horn. My current barrel horse that I've been hauling and seasoning is starting to clock 1D/2D times now that im pushing him some....he doesnt jave extremely snappy turns...he makes up his time in between barrels. I would post videos but I'm on my phone. Saying that bc a horse is 1D/2D so they'll whip you off during they're turns is really rather ridiculous. You have to consider turn style before what D they're in. NO barrel horse should out turn you....if so get off that horse and work on your riding.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BarrelWannabe    
And I wouldn't necessarily hope on a 1D can eater. Even if you can handle high speed turns, that horse will WHIP you out of that saddle, even if you have a solid seat. If you're comfortable loping tight turns, you could try a 3D-4D horse. Just as the horse has to learn the pattern, YOU have to too.

You could possibly look for automatic and steady. Something that's been to a few rodeos.
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    11-11-2011, 01:09 PM
  #6
Yearling
Ok. Pardon me for being horribly wrong. Next time I won't say anything.
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    11-11-2011, 01:48 PM
  #7
Banned
Depends on who you are....




Now, for a good rider, there is absolutely no reason to get bounced out of the saddle on even a 1D world caliber horse--with the rare exception of those super-rough horses, who generally have soundness issues anyways and probably shouldn't be barrel racing in the first place. That's what balance and horsemanship are for.

An exceptional team:

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    11-11-2011, 01:56 PM
  #8
Banned
And shameless plugs for a hard-to-ride mare 1D mare (now sadly retired after a far too short career)....plenty of errors on my part, surely, but not a whole lot of bouncing in the saddle going around as she flings herself wildly around the turns....


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    11-14-2011, 12:03 AM
  #9
Trained
Accidents happen. Even the best riders screw up, we're not all perfect. If you don't fall once in awhile, you're clearly doing something wrong.
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    11-14-2011, 12:25 AM
  #10
Banned
I disagree. If you're falling off, either you a) have no balance, b) can't read a horse, or c) aren't paying attention or are acting like an idiot (and are thus violating every law of horsemanship).

I will, *cough*, on rare occasions, fall victim to the latter. Which generally involves something along the lines of trying to hop, bareback and bridleless, on the spooky mare on a windy day in the middle of the pasture with loose horses while carrying a handful of halters and a feed bucket. That one did not end well. I was picking grass and dirt clumps out of my underwear all evening. Ahem.

But I was also acting like an idiot, far from "doing something right." Good riders don't fall off.

Getting bucked off and bailing are two different scenarios. The former is justifiable if you've got a real bronc (but the rather valid argument could be made that, 9 times out of 10, a good rider can prevent a bucking episode in the first place). The latter comes into play if you've got a terrified colt or something and there's no good way to ride out the scenario. An emergency dismount can save you from paralysis and also prevent bad things from happening to your mount in his terror.
     

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