Training "Skelator" - Page 7
 
 

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Training "Skelator"

This is a discussion on Training "Skelator" within the Barrel Racing forums, part of the Western Riding category

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        06-13-2013, 12:29 PM
      #61
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AnalisaParalyzer    

    I would hate to have some of you out at my barn watching some of the boarders and kids. The number of horses ridden hollow, some of the bits, some of the tack, some of the methods. Some of you would have the owners crying and giving up horses for good.

    So because they do it, it's a good thing to do? You need a new trainer, you need to stop calling yourself a trainer since you're not able to work through his issues. Please do him a favor, either start him over as if he'd never been ridden, or send him to a professional who will. The former owner has fried him and you are only going to make it worse.
         
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        06-13-2013, 12:33 PM
      #62
    Started
    I was encouraging to you. I really was. But. Now, either sell the horse to someone capable or get a different trainer, or simply admit you were in the wrong and take our advice. We are not idiots here. We've all given you good sound advice, that pretty much anyone is capable of doing.
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        06-13-2013, 12:46 PM
      #63
    Trained
    OK, you know the only one that I see here suggesting beating him up or scaring him is you, and that tells me a lot about your thoughts on training, because that is what YOU read into what people are saying.

    I honestly think that people have given you far to much credit as a trainer, because when I read "work him through his issues" I read passive resistance, patient repetition, small advances with plenty of rewards, but that is the way I work through issues.

    I am concerned that your first reaction to people having a different view from you, or offering advice is to get snarky and defensive, your thoughts on training out issues seem to be violent and forceful, it really really makes me question if you have the disposition to be training horses.

    Sorry but that is the truth as I see it,
         
        06-13-2013, 12:47 PM
      #64
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AnalisaParalyzer    
    I HAVE EVER SEDATED A HORSE FOR TRAINING. PERIOD. His PREVIOUS owner sedated him.


    So. Your kid is scared. So you beat him scare him some more. "oh your scared? Here let me give you a reason." im not going to FORCE this horse. Im not going to blow up at him for BEING a horse. He needs to learn he can trust me, not that he's going to get smacked around every time he's scared.

    I act like its no big deal. Nothin to be scared of. He freaks out, ok. Come back to me, we're going to try again.
    Freak out, ok, come back, try again. No freak out, just a refusal. Good horse. No reason to freak. Im not going to chase him, hurt him, punish him. Theres nothing to fear here.

    but dot see the point in forcing him to accept something that terrifys him, if I have an alternative. Sorry, but I know theres a few who agree with me.

    He's not around kids aright now and for good reason. I don't plan on having him around kids for a long time. I know a rearing horse is dangerous. See it first hand enough times. Been on the receiving end with this boy already. Honestly. The horse would strike and bite at you if you stood too close to him 7 months ago. He's come MILES I his attitude. And LEAPS in his willingness to do. Im proud of him. And, im proud of me. I gained his trust, he takes a saddle, a bridle, and a rider. Even if not a bit. And he does it WITHOUT sedation. Progress, I my opinion.
    You're joking right??? Horse Training 101, he needs to learn to accept fearful things and how to respond PROPERLY. Knowing he can do whatever he feels like to get him out of a scary or undesirable situation, isn't helping you or him.

    Forget the bit vs. sidepull issue. Obviously your mind is set, against better judgement.

    But if your mentality is to avoid what scares him or makes him uncomfortable I'm not trying to take away some of the good things that you've accomplished with him. Doing that gets people hurt. Proven FACT.

    I'm not trying to take away the possitive things you HAVE done, BUT you are skipping very important steps to the training / re-training of any horse. Most horses can be started in 30 days. S.T.A.R.T.E.D. They have no other experience to base what's going on with them to give them a bad taste in their mouths, so to speak. This horse is different (as you know). I'm willing to bet, there's a lot less "fear" going on than you think. He's got your number.
         
        06-13-2013, 01:19 PM
      #65
    Weanling
    Wooooow

    O_o

    Everyone needs to chill. Seriously.
         
        06-13-2013, 01:38 PM
      #66
    Yearling
    Its cool redhorse. Every single thread I post up in this forum has been like this since I posted asking what to do about a couple of mustangs in one of my very first threads. Some people took offense and now I can't seem to get anything but ^.


    I have never, ever bee accused of being violent or forceful. If I was, this horse would be trying to kill me, the way he was his previous owner.

    I did get some good advice, which ill be taking. And I appreciate the helpfull, friendly advice.

    Im still going to update this thread with his progress. Because its easy for me to track this way.
         
        06-13-2013, 07:08 PM
      #67
    Trained
    If it were my horse to restart, I would do it this way and I have pretty high standards. First off the horse would be taught to lower his poll with a touch, no pressure but a touch, for bridling, haltering, etc. I would not move on until he will lower his head and accept a bridle as if he was the best horse in the world to bridle, yes with a snaffle. After that, he would be ground driven everywhere, past scary lawnmovers, leafblowers, everywhere until it was just like another day on the job. Then he when he was saddled, I would longe him lightly with loose side or long reins attached to the saddle, until he got into the workmanship & it was another day at the office for him. Then I would mount him but not until he stood perfectly for mounting, dismounting, offside as well, using a mounting block or not. First lesson under saddle and many subsequent ones would be at a walk, and he would learn flexing each side until he dropped his poll and lifted his back muscles and started stepping under himself. After he was rock solid on that, we would move on to the back & stop, which is just flexing & lifting & stepping underhimself BUT from both sides at the same time, there's your stop and the back is when the cues are not released, the horse will back off of it. After that is rote for him, then we move onto the trot doing the same exercises which will be a part of his "come back to me & listen" touchstones for the rest of his life and through every scary situation. I have spent many years and tens of thousands of dollars learning this from respected, knowledgeable trainers. If you don't have the proper body position, weight distribution, feel of the rein, release of the rein, timing etc., it's schmutzy and rudimentary, I have been on the road to get away from that, I think I am almost at the end of my journey, phew!
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        06-25-2013, 12:16 PM
      #68
    Weanling
    I have a pretty successful training/lesson program and all I'm thinking is if someone sent me a horse that reared when he saw a bit.. even if he rode in a hack, the bit would be one of the first issues I'd tackle.

    That horse has your number, he's getting away with dangerous behaviors. I really don't care if he's doing them because he's scared or not.. rearing/biting is INEXCUSABLE and should not be tolerated regardless of the reason they are doing it.

    Since you like to reference disciplining children in comparison to horse training..... would I smack my scared child? No. Would I smack my scared child that bit me? You better believe it!! Fear is no excuse for things that dangerous.

    The moment that horse reared while I was trying to bit him he would have gotten a swift smack with a lunge whip and his feet would stay moving till he relaxed... they'll learn pretty quick that it's best to stand on all 4's like a big boy.
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    beau159 likes this.
         

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