What to look for in a barrel horse?
   

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What to look for in a barrel horse?

This is a discussion on What to look for in a barrel horse? within the Barrel Racing forums, part of the Western Riding category
  • How to buy a good barrel racing horse
  • Conformation of a fast barrel horse

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    07-29-2012, 11:51 AM
  #1
Foal
What to look for in a barrel horse?

I have been looking into buying a barrel horse, as you could probably guess:) I need a horse for college, and as far as I can tell, all of the horses that have fast enough times, are way too expensive! I'm left believing that if I want a fast barrel horse, I need to get one with potential and train it myself, because it seems like the untrained ones cost less. But how do I know a horse is good at barrels if it is only a yearling??? I know nothing about bloodlines, conformation, etc. I can tell a good barrel horse when they are all filled out, around the age of 4 or 5, but I am planning on buying a yearling, and I can't tell with them. Also, is foundation bred better for barrel racing? I feel awkward asking the owners questions about bloodlines and things, because if I'm buying a horse I want to know what I'm talking about. I just don't know what to get! I have trained solid 3D barrel horses before, a couple of 2D, but now I am looking into training a 1D and feel like I am ready for something faster. Any help is great! I prefer shorter stockier horses, but my friend also barre races and her tall thin QH does just as well, so what build is better? Any help is great:) By the way, I will be doing college rodeo in 3 years, and will do rodeo for 4 years. I want a horse no younger than a 2 year old, as I want to train it myself and know that it's being taught right. I don't want to have to backtrack and fix other peoples mistakes.
     
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    07-29-2012, 11:54 AM
  #2
Green Broke
Are you sure a yearling is what you really want? I thought most people didn't even start a horse on barrels until the horse was 4 or 5 years old - you'd be out of college by then.
     
    07-29-2012, 12:00 PM
  #3
Green Broke
Why not buy a green broke, 3 or 4 year old. Arabian is right, you don't start a barrel horse till they are 4 or 5, just like with jumping. May I ask. Why do you NEED a horse for collage? I've never seen a collage where you need your own horse?
     
    07-29-2012, 12:00 PM
  #4
Foal
Well, basically I am huge on starting a horse out right. I don't want to buy a finished barrel horse, having no idea if it had a good foundation and base training, but you are right, maybe I should look a little older. 2 or 3? I don't want them to have been started under saddle when I buy one. My friend has a barrel horse that she started under saddle at 2 years old, and started training it on barrel right away and it is the biggest hot-head I've ever seen., and it has no idea of leg ques, leads, etc. All it knows is barrels.
     
    07-29-2012, 12:05 PM
  #5
Trained
I'm not trying to be rude here... But, going off of these 3 threads, I highly doubt that you have the capability to train a horse to the level of college rodeo.

My horse won't RUN! Lazy or Disinterested?
Barrel Bumper! Quick fix?
Gate Sour! Help!

You seem very inexperienced in those threads and if you have trained horses to 3D and 2D, you wouldn't be having those issues that you've publicly posted about in those 3 threads.

A high quality barrel-bred yearling can cost just as much as a seasoned barrel 2D/3D barrel horse.

If I were you, I'd save my money and buy something already trained, ready to compete, and take lessons to get to the level of college rodeo. It's a tough sport and you have to be at the top of your game, and have a top-notch horse in order to get there.

Your timing is also unrealistic. You want a yearling, but you plan to go to college in 3 years. That means the horse is only 4 years old at that point in time. I don't even START my horses on barrel until 4. How do you plan to run and compete with the big girls on a 4 year old? It'll take at least 2 years to train a seasoned, consistent barrel horse. That means you'll be halfway through college before you'll even be placing...MAYBE!

Not trying to be a party-pooper, but this is not well thought out. And from the posts you've started here, you're just not that the level to train a 1D horse.

Save your money, and buy something already trained and ready to run. That's going to be the best advice your likely to get.
     
    07-29-2012, 12:08 PM
  #6
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ally56    
Well, basically I am huge on starting a horse out right. I don't want to buy a finished barrel horse, having no idea if it had a good foundation and base training, but you are right, maybe I should look a little older. 2 or 3? I don't want them to have been started under saddle when I buy one. My friend has a barrel horse that she started under saddle at 2 years old, and started training it on barrel right away and it is the biggest hot-head I've ever seen., and it has no idea of leg ques, leads, etc. All it knows is barrels.
A good horse-person can tell what horses have a great foundation, and what horses need work. If you can't tell what horse has a good foundation or what horse has holes in training just by watching them being ridden, or test riding them by yourself...Well...I'm not even going to finish that sentence...
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    07-29-2012, 02:41 PM
  #7
Started
I had the same thought at claporte. Why don't you just start saving for a horse that is trained and ready to go. If you have a couple years you will have the time to save for a nice horse. With your time frame stated it just isnt possible and what happens if you buy a horse that you thought woud work (at a young age) and then the horse doesnt want anything to do with the pattern etc. Save for the horse and save yourself the possibility of being let down. That way you can look at a few top notch horses that you know enjoy their job and love what they do, when you have the money
     
    07-30-2012, 10:54 AM
  #8
Green Broke
I agree with the others. I am hearing too many contradictory things in your own posts here.

Yes, of course a good barrel horse is going to be expensive. The same way a good reining horse or a good western pleasure horse or a good tie down roping horse would be expensive. Someone put years of training into the horse to make it good -- that is worth something. If you send a horse to a trainer (a cheap one would be $300 a month) for 3 or 4 months, you've already dished out a minimum of $1,200 in training toward the value of that horse. Plus, a good horse can win some big bucks at big rodeos.

Of course untrained horses cost less. They haven't had training or someone sticking time and money and experience into them. They don't know anything!

How do you know if a yearling is good at barrels, or any other event for that matter? You don't. It's a yearling. However, bloodlines can play a factor and if you are wanting something that's most likely going to be a top-notch NFR horse (potentially), expect to spend at least 5 figures. Yes, 5 figures. Although in this horse market, it is possible to find something with decent bloodlines for under $1,000. It won't be top-notch bloodlines, but it will be decent.

If you don't know anything about bloodlines or confirmation, start reading up. Barrel Horse News, the Barrel Racing Report, and many more are good sources. Western Horseman, Equus, and Horse and Rider are just a few good general horse information magazine. And if you are going to go look at a horse, do your homework before hand. Ask others you trust and are well-educated before you go, and/or have them help you make a decision on what to look for. You can also get your hands on books and DVD's by some of the greats like Charmayne James, Sherry Cervi, Dena Kirkpatrick, Martha Josey, and more. Not only do they go over how to train a barrel horse, but they will talk about important things like bloodlines, conformation, looking at prospects, hauling, tack, and more. Get into some resources if you want to learn.

I'm very confused with your tone as you say you know what you are doing because you've trained a few 2D/3D horses in the past and don't want to fix other's mistakes, but yet you don't know what to look for and don't know if the horse has bad habits. I don't think that's the best tone to take. From what I've read in just this post (I haven't even looked at the others), I'd say you are toward a beginner barrel racer due to the sole fact you don't seem to know any general horse background. I am not saying that's a bad thing, as everyone on this forum was there at one point in time, but you need to come to terms with that in order to learn and to grow.

CLaPorte432 is exactly right.

And if you can't afford a trained ready-to-go barrel horse, you can always try to find one to lease, which is usually cheaper.
     
    08-01-2012, 02:38 PM
  #9
Foal
Sorry, but it is really nobody's business what I do with my horses, how I train them, how my stories match up, etc. I am my own person, none of you even know me, and it's not like some stranger online is going to change my mind. I asked a simple question. What conformation is best for barrel racing. If you aren't answering that question, don't reply. Whether I am successful or not is nobody's problem but my own, and as long as no people or horses are being hurt in the process, it shouldn't matter. I though that this was a sight I could ask questions and get help, not be criticized. The criticism doesn't make me want to get help, it only makes me want to try harder to prove I can do it on my own, so none of you are being of any help. Maybe I'll go to another sight and see if people are more helpful there.
     
    08-01-2012, 03:11 PM
  #10
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ally56    
Sorry, but it is really nobody's business what I do with my horses, how I train them, how my stories match up, etc. I am my own person, none of you even know me, and it's not like some stranger online is going to change my mind. I asked a simple question. What conformation is best for barrel racing. If you aren't answering that question, don't reply. Whether I am successful or not is nobody's problem but my own, and as long as no people or horses are being hurt in the process, it shouldn't matter. I though that this was a sight I could ask questions and get help, not be criticized. The criticism doesn't make me want to get help, it only makes me want to try harder to prove I can do it on my own, so none of you are being of any help. Maybe I'll go to another sight and see if people are more helpful there.
Good idea go some where else, you will get the same answer.

People are trying to help you, but you don't want to listen.

In the end you could ruin a horse if you don't know how to train it properly. From what we see in your other threads, it is obvious that you still have more to learn before you get to that level. No one is born knowing every thing, we all had to learn from the begining. It's nothing to be ashamed of. I know the basics of training a reiner, and have trained the basics on my mare, but I'm not going to go out and buy a horse that is to young for the training, and try to train it beyond my knowlage with out a trainer.

BTW if you absalutly must do it, you can find older horses (3-4) that have never been broke to ride. That is the ONLY way even posible for you ta have a horse trained to run in your time line.
beau159 likes this.
     

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