Our First Ranch Sorting and Team Penning Clinic! - The Horse Forum

 6Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 15 Old 04-02-2014, 11:36 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Grand Valley ON, Canada
Posts: 186
• Horses: 3
Our First Ranch Sorting and Team Penning Clinic!

So, I am taking Shamus in my first sorting/penning clinic in 2 weeks! Its for beginners, and I am excited for the learning experience! So my question is, what should I work on for specifics to get him ready for the clinic?
Cappaloosa is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 15 Old 04-02-2014, 02:37 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: New England
Posts: 390
• Horses: 1
Awesome! You are going to have a blast!
You're going to figure out a lot of things really fast as you start working the cows.
I find that having a calm yet responsive horse is the most helpful, even if they're not super quick or agile (mine's not). Some things that you can be working on are transitions, getting a good 'whoa' and having your horse move forward off of your leg consistently and in an eager manner. In the beginning I think that's all you really need. It might take some time for your horse to get comfortable around the cattle and during that period I wouldn't push him to do too much. Let him smell them and interact with them. I see a lot of people really get after their horses when they want them to cut a cow out of the herd but I think that adds a lot of stress to your horse right from the get go. Given a little time, a lot of horse's will figure out that it's a lot of fun to push the cows around and it's nice to let your horse learn that. It makes it a fun experience for them. Keep it stress free and I'm sure your horse will learn to enjoy it. Working cattle is the ONLY time that my horse isn't lazy. He loves chasing cows!
As you get more advanced, you can start introducing some speed, start teaching roll backs and more advanced stops but for now just keep it casual and enjoy yourselves. The more that you're able to interact with the cattle, the better you'll be able to 'read' them and the better you and your horse will be when you're working them.
Also, be cautious of how you're riding. It's easy to get wrapped up in the idea of pushing the cattle where you need them to go before you run out of time. Sometimes when that happens you can forget about horsemanship to some degree. I was horrified when I saw a video of one of my first runs and I realized that I was rushing and getting after my horse more than I meant to. I just got trapped in the moment but it was definitely embarrassing. Make sure to relax and have fun with your horse.
Btw, I'm still relatively new to the world of cattle sorting and penning and I have a lot to learn but one thing that I KNOW is that it's a ton of fun!
Golden Horse likes this.
laurapratt01 is offline  
post #3 of 15 Old 04-02-2014, 06:50 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Grand Valley ON, Canada
Posts: 186
• Horses: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by laurapratt01 View Post
Awesome! You are going to have a blast!
You're going to figure out a lot of things really fast as you start working the cows.
I find that having a calm yet responsive horse is the most helpful, even if they're not super quick or agile (mine's not). Some things that you can be working on are transitions, getting a good 'whoa' and having your horse move forward off of your leg consistently and in an eager manner. In the beginning I think that's all you really need. It might take some time for your horse to get comfortable around the cattle and during that period I wouldn't push him to do too much. Let him smell them and interact with them. I see a lot of people really get after their horses when they want them to cut a cow out of the herd but I think that adds a lot of stress to your horse right from the get go. Given a little time, a lot of horse's will figure out that it's a lot of fun to push the cows around and it's nice to let your horse learn that. It makes it a fun experience for them. Keep it stress free and I'm sure your horse will learn to enjoy it. Working cattle is the ONLY time that my horse isn't lazy. He loves chasing cows!
As you get more advanced, you can start introducing some speed, start teaching roll backs and more advanced stops but for now just keep it casual and enjoy yourselves. The more that you're able to interact with the cattle, the better you'll be able to 'read' them and the better you and your horse will be when you're working them.
Also, be cautious of how you're riding. It's easy to get wrapped up in the idea of pushing the cattle where you need them to go before you run out of time. Sometimes when that happens you can forget about horsemanship to some degree. I was horrified when I saw a video of one of my first runs and I realized that I was rushing and getting after my horse more than I meant to. I just got trapped in the moment but it was definitely embarrassing. Make sure to relax and have fun with your horse.
Btw, I'm still relatively new to the world of cattle sorting and penning and I have a lot to learn but one thing that I KNOW is that it's a ton of fun!
that's awesome! Ill be sure not to push him too much around the cows for a little while but you're making me very excited! It looks like it'll be a blast :)
Cappaloosa is offline  
post #4 of 15 Old 04-25-2014, 03:40 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 5,995
• Horses: 0
Did you go to the clinic? How did it go?

visit us at www.wolferanch.com
Cherie is offline  
post #5 of 15 Old 05-14-2014, 11:12 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: nc
Posts: 1,341
• Horses: 0
Slow is smooth, smooth is fast.
Fort fireman is offline  
post #6 of 15 Old 05-14-2014, 11:40 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Grand Valley ON, Canada
Posts: 186
• Horses: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie View Post
Did you go to the clinic? How did it go?
We did go, and he was a little champion and I had the time of my life! By the end of the second day I was getting all sorts of compliments about how good he was coming along.

He was a little nervous at first but once he realized that the cows would move away from him he was all over it. He was great at calmly going into the heard to cut out a cow, but the area we need to work on is keeping him on a line towards the cow and rolling back (as he wanted to circle instead of roll back on the cow), but I'm sure it'll come with time and the more experience I get in the arena. I have just about as much experience as he does in penning/sorting! But the clinician will be giving us lessons so I'm very much looking forward to having a good coach to bring us along.
Roadyy and Cynical25 like this.
Cappaloosa is offline  
post #7 of 15 Old 05-16-2014, 03:12 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 5,995
• Horses: 0
You need to visit this thread on the difference between reining and cowhorse 'turn-arounds'. The Difference Between a CowHorse Turnaround and a Spin

Then, if you drop down to my post (I think it is # 9) you will see Boyd Rice starting a 2 year old on the kind of roll-backs a horse has to do to work a cow.

Quote:
I think the video of Buck is a really lousy example of a cutter/cowhorse turn-around. It is a hybrid cross of a reining turn-around and a backing without stepping behind. It actually shows a horse trying to do a reining type spin while the rider is not letting the horse have the forward movement he needs. I makes the horse switch his hind pivot foot and hop like I said would happen if the horse is not low in front, 'flat' and not keeping enough forward motion.

I found a video of Boyd Rice who I consider to be the best horseman and all around trainer out there today. If you have not heard of him, He has won the Snaffle Bit Futurity at Reno, the NCHA Super Stakes and Derby and this year won the 'World's Greatest Horseman' event. I think he has almost $4 million in earnings and is still in his 40s. He is pure poetry on a horse and I think his videos are great.

He is a short clip showing how to start backing a horse into a true rollback where the horse steps behind himself. He is doing the 'backing in a circle' that I talked about on this baby.

Here is his website -- Rice Performance Horses | Boyd Rice
If you want a horse to learn to 'hold' a cow, you:

1) Make the horse stop straight, shoulder to shoulder to the cow.

2) When the cow turns and goes the other way, back him up 1 or 2 steps, straight.

3) Roll him around slow -- never hurrying him up in the turn-around -- NEVER.

4) Then, when he is all the way around, hurry him up to catch up to the cow.

This is why a flag or a single cow in a large round pen work so well. The cow (or flag) is always there and the horse can always hustle and catch up to it without losing it back to a herd.

Any good cutting or cowhorse prospect will start speeding their turn-arounds up by themselves if they keep having to play 'catch-up.

If you back him up like in the video of Boyd Rice, he will stop making those little circles when he changes directions.
Cherie

visit us at www.wolferanch.com
Cherie is offline  
post #8 of 15 Old 05-20-2014, 01:08 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Grand Valley ON, Canada
Posts: 186
• Horses: 3
Thank you!! I will most definitely have to practice that with him.

So when you say should to shoulder do you mean parallel to the cow?
Cappaloosa is offline  
post #9 of 15 Old 03-27-2015, 11:50 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Grand Valley ON, Canada
Posts: 186
• Horses: 3
Hey guys, I know this is an old thread but I just wanted to let everyone know how much your advice helped and how far Shamus and I have come.

We went to a 3 Man Full Arena Sorting Jackpot and we won! Silly me didn't enter in the jackpot thinking we didn't need any extra pressure. Haha I guess Shamus felt like taking the challenge :P.

Anyways, Shamus was a champ! He was tracking cows like an old pro and would drop a cow anytime I asked him to. He never cut out the wrong cow and even though he was pretty jacked up, he never tried to run through my hands. A girl who was at the original clinic was there and she said she couldn't believe he was the same horse! His confidence has jumped leaps and bounds and he was so soft and responsive.

Anyways, I just wanted to share my proud mama moment :)
jamesdean57 and Mercy98 like this.
Cappaloosa is offline  
post #10 of 15 Old 03-27-2015, 12:59 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Indiana
Posts: 1,257
• Horses: 1
Good to hear, Cappaloosa! Mind me asking what the last year looked like for the two of you as far as training goes? I started ranch sorting on my mare last summer. It started out rocky! Me fighting nerves and her fighting me because of my nerves :) After most of the winter off we are getting back into it. I'm looking forward to this summer!
jenkat86 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Beginning Team sorting/penning on a young horse? trainerunlimited Cutting and Team Penning 11 02-05-2012 12:10 AM
Team Penning and Team Sorting CowgirlHannah Cutting and Team Penning 7 01-16-2012 12:46 PM
Team Penning and Ranch Sorting in Bowling Green, KY Team Penner Cutting and Team Penning 0 12-29-2010 02:45 AM
Wanting to attend a team penning or sorting clinic Team Penner Western Riding 2 02-26-2010 12:18 PM
Team Penning/Sorting -- Boots? RubyLover Horse Tack and Equipment 10 09-29-2009 03:56 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome