Clydesdale's
   

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Clydesdale's

This is a discussion on Clydesdale's within the Draft Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • The cost of owning a clydesdale
  • Clydesdale feathering care

 
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    01-12-2009, 06:34 PM
  #1
Yearling
Clydesdale's

I was thinking about buying a Clydesdale.

What are there temperments like?
Easy to handle?
Would they suit a beginner that has low confidence?


I don't no why Im so interested in them. I think its because my Granddad used to ride them and he tells me alot of stories about them. My Mum actually likes them to so that's a bonus :P

Sorry for so many questions!

Cheers
     
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    01-12-2009, 09:55 PM
  #2
Started
What use do you have in mind for your horse?
     
    01-12-2009, 10:23 PM
  #3
Yearling
Within breeds of horses, there are different personalities, just like with people. A lot of people think that ALL draft horses have laid-back personalities but that isn't necessarily so.

I can say from my experience, that my draft colt (part clyde) usually thinks before he reacts, is overall calmer than my light horses but that could be just him, not the draft in him. Another thing I've learned since he grew extra large is that they do generally cost more money to maintain. He eats more in bulk than a regular horse, although he doesn't need more nutrients; it costs more to get his feet done and it can be hard to find a farrier willing to work with your horse; I've had to special order his tack because you can't find a 62" girth, draft size bits, bridles, etc. at most tack stores and I'm currently in need of a new horse trailer because he's too tall for my average horse sized trailer.

He is pretty easy to handle but we've done all the groundwork and stay on top of him so he doesn't learn how big he is and get pushy. He is very smart and learns quickly. I'm taller than average and I do have to use a step stool to groom the top of his back, saddle him and get on so if you are little, that could be a problem.

An older (over 10 yrs. Old), already trained horse with a calm personality could be good for someone with low confidence as long as they had a trainer to guide them.

One thing that is against a beginner owning a Clyde is maintaining their feathers and the health of their skin underneath them. They look wonderful in pictures but you really have to know how to care for them.

Do your homework and find a reputable breeder and go in with your eyes open. How's the little spotted pony working out??
     
    01-12-2009, 11:43 PM
  #4
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joshie    
What use do you have in mind for your horse?

Pleasure riding, just something to learn on and have a bit of fun.
     
    01-12-2009, 11:44 PM
  #5
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by danastark    
Within breeds of horses, there are different personalities, just like with people. A lot of people think that ALL draft horses have laid-back personalities but that isn't necessarily so.

I can say from my experience, that my draft colt (part clyde) usually thinks before he reacts, is overall calmer than my light horses but that could be just him, not the draft in him. Another thing I've learned since he grew extra large is that they do generally cost more money to maintain. He eats more in bulk than a regular horse, although he doesn't need more nutrients; it costs more to get his feet done and it can be hard to find a farrier willing to work with your horse; I've had to special order his tack because you can't find a 62" girth, draft size bits, bridles, etc. at most tack stores and I'm currently in need of a new horse trailer because he's too tall for my average horse sized trailer.

He is pretty easy to handle but we've done all the groundwork and stay on top of him so he doesn't learn how big he is and get pushy. He is very smart and learns quickly. I'm taller than average and I do have to use a step stool to groom the top of his back, saddle him and get on so if you are little, that could be a problem.

An older (over 10 yrs. Old), already trained horse with a calm personality could be good for someone with low confidence as long as they had a trainer to guide them.

One thing that is against a beginner owning a Clyde is maintaining their feathers and the health of their skin underneath them. They look wonderful in pictures but you really have to know how to care for them.

Do your homework and find a reputable breeder and go in with your eyes open. How's the little spotted pony working out??

Thankyou, I will do a little more homework before I decide.

My pony isnt quite working out, had a bit of a fright yesterday while riding her so we are thinking of selling her but not quite sure yet.
     
    01-13-2009, 01:00 PM
  #6
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazyChester    
I was thinking about buying a Clydesdale.

What are there temperments like?
Easy to handle?
Would they suit a beginner that has low confidence?


I don't no why Im so interested in them. I think its because my Granddad used to ride them and he tells me alot of stories about them. My Mum actually likes them to so that's a bonus :P

Sorry for so many questions!

Cheers
They are fantastic horses work with tho I would not recommend it for a first time horse owner, or someone who isn't confident with their horse handling.
Once well worked with and handled, they are to die for but you have to get them there first, they aren't born like that so when working with them you are dealing with WAY more horse power than your more common light breeds.
I regularly see some great looking Clydes or other full drafts for sale on the web. You should go out and take a look at a few, ride and go from there. Tho they are stunning looking animals they really don't handle the same as what you are used to.
     
    01-13-2009, 01:00 PM
  #7
Trained
I recently bought a Clyde/QH cross and she has one of the best personalities that I have ever seen. She is super quick and very teachable. It could be just her, I don't know, this is the first draft that I have ever owned.

Dana, what do you have to do with the feathers? Caly doesn't have overly long ones, but she does have them more than your average horse.
     
    01-13-2009, 04:45 PM
  #8
Yearling
Thanks everyone!

Im not sure if I will be buying one but I would love to!
     
    01-13-2009, 06:02 PM
  #9
Weanling
Fehr, their feathers need to be kept clean and dry mainly. I have seen lots of clydes who have scratches under the feathers because they are wet/standing in mud all the time and all that hair just holds in the moisture and bacteria. I know several people who use goldbond powder on their feathers in wet weather to try and keep the skin from getting to wet and nasty. They swear by it and I have never seen their horses with scratches.
     
    01-14-2009, 09:25 AM
  #10
Foal
I personally have not owned a clyde but also would love to, but I have and do own belgians, it was my first horse to ever own and i'll tell you its ahrad animal to learn with, when they go throught their two year old attitudes you really have to keep up with them they are more pushy than lighter horses. I would recommed trying to find one to lease first, if your not very confident then getting on the back of a horse that big can scare you even more, believe me I know lol. But if you lease one then you'll find out if the breed would be right for you or not, and if your enjoying it then it gives you time to look for the perfect one while still learning with the leased one. Well I wish you good luck.
     

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