do draft crosses show qualities that might make them good dressage horses? - Page 14
   

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do draft crosses show qualities that might make them good dressage horses?

This is a discussion on do draft crosses show qualities that might make them good dressage horses? within the Draft Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
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    12-15-2012, 09:16 AM
  #131
Showing
Warmbloods many years ago were the crossing of the drafts often with TBs in europe which produce the carriage horses. These horses are tall, substantially heavier than a TB with more bone than the TB. Some say a qh is a warmblood. By european standards it's not because draft isn't in it's background.
     
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    12-15-2012, 11:25 AM
  #132
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by minstrel    
I have actually broken, brought on and competed three different Clydesdales over the years, and whilst I love them to bits and they make fab riding horses, they aren't made for upper levels of dressage unless they are a real one in a million. They are too long in the back in general, and until they build up fitness and muscle they actually find a 20m circle a really hard thig to do, ESP in canter, as they are so big! Now I love Clydesdales, and mean no offence at all when I say that, but rey do have disadvantages as dressage horses. However, the Clydesdales I've worked with I've trained to novice/elementary dressage, which after some time they do very well at, and then they do a whole lot better when showing under saddle, so I'm by no means saying don't do dressage with them! If you want a draft, then yes they can do low level (and with good training and a good horse sometimes more), but if its specifically dressage you want to do I would say they aren't te first breed of choice: a warm blood will be.
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Absolutely agree! If anyone is looking specifically for a dressage horse for top level competition, then you go for a sports horse - not a heavy. However, if you just fall into it by chance and you happen to have a heavy, then go for it. I am sure there will one day, be a heavy horse who does compete at top level dressage. I am just waiting for the right rider to be brave enough to take on such a challenge. Similar to an english rider a few years agos who rode a 'joke' of a horse in top level dressage. The horse was considered 'too small' by the dressage elite. Anyway, she won a top level dressage competition (national level)and suddenly the smiles were wiped from quite a few peoples faces. I will try and find out the name of the rider and the name of the horse unless someone on the forum can remember who it was. I love things that push the norm... which is why I ride heavies...LOL
     
    12-19-2012, 03:42 PM
  #133
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by thesilverspear    
Why do people get all wound up when it is suggested that warmbloods are the best breed for competitive, upper level dressage? To me, it's no different then saying thoroughbreds make the best steeplechasers and QHs make the best reining horses.

On the Horse and Hound forum, someone asked about Highlands competing in dressage, and Highland owners/breeders basically said, yeah, generally speaking, they're good fun up 'till about medium, but if you want to go further, you're asking a lot from them and if they can manage that collection at all, they may not stay sound. No one got upset or accused people of being arrogant about certain breeds. It was all quite sensible.

I think in this case because the original question was whether or not a draft can do dressage. The simple answer is yes. To go further one might say, they are great for low and if you are lucky, medium levels of dressage. The average beginner rider (one who asks if a draft will be good for him to do dressage) will likely not be headed toward Grand Prix any time soon.

It is nice that Horse and Hound was sensible on this topic. My first view of that forum was anything but when the verbal bashing of American's took place on the "heavier riders" thread. I have never given them another look since then. Even though I didn't fall into the catagory of being attacked myself, I hate seeing any group being attacked and commentary on an entire country rubs me wrong.
Bluebird and Tnavas like this.
     
    12-19-2012, 03:59 PM
  #134
Yearling
Agree re: drafts might be perfect for lower level dressage riders.

If I need specific information about stuff on this side of the world, Horse and Hound far better as it's mostly a British-based forum. There are a few UK posters here, but they are a small minority. I didn't see the thread you're talking about, but that is a stereotype the rest of the world has about Americans, with all the inaccuracies and accuracies of any other stereotype!
     
    12-19-2012, 04:11 PM
  #135
Green Broke
Depends on the breed cross and the horse. My belgian x appy x Morgan type mare has more front leg action then the Perch x appy x quarter type gelding.
The horses I see around, bred for dressage seem to be bred uphill with a low back end, and is a conformation fault just as is a butt high horse. Find a horse with a good shoulder that would allow for the movement.
     
    12-21-2012, 03:13 AM
  #136
Weanling
What a read! Haha

I actually came her to post Airthrey Highlander as an example of how far some Draft Crosses can go. It all depends on the individual.

Here in NZ the Clyde TBX is almost a staple, for a level headed horse that can turn it's hand relatively well at almost anything you throw at it. We seem to have perfected the Clyde X TB breedings to a precise art and they are very common in any (english) show that you go to here (obviously not in the park hack ring :P).

When it comes down to it, so long as the horse isn't a trainwreck in body and mind they can do relatively well in the lower levels. Due to the non-existent OP we won't know what level they were aiming at.
     
    12-21-2012, 04:44 AM
  #137
Green Broke
I thought i'd chip in here, someone quoted a conniextb being a good dressage horse earlier?
Well yes if you breed 2 athletic types of horse/pony you will get an athletic horse. Very different to a draft x. Connies are NOT drafts in any shape or way

Connies have a heck of a lot of spanish blood in them, they are also bred to be athletic ponies who can jump well (take a look at the UK 14.2hh pony showjumping teams lots and lots of connie blood there) and do well enough at dressage because they have the angles, athletasism and mind to do it. It is not uncommon for a purebred connie to be working at advanced medium with a half decent rider. (mine took me from pootling round the field to medium level and had I the skill and knowlege would have gone further, he did very very correct changes for fun)

The connie TB cross has been the corner post of many FEI PONY teams.

So sorry but I don't see how throwing a connie x in there supports your draft argument
     
    12-26-2012, 05:42 PM
  #138
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluebird    
Similar to an english rider a few years agos who rode a 'joke' of a horse in top level dressage. The horse was considered 'too small' by the dressage elite. Anyway, she won a top level dressage competition (national level)and suddenly the smiles were wiped from quite a few peoples faces. I will try and find out the name of the rider and the name of the horse unless someone on the forum can remember who it was. I love things that push the norm... which is why I ride heavies...LOL
Are you thinking of Lendon Gray and Seldom Seen, a 14.2 Connemara Thoroughbred cross?
     
    12-27-2012, 05:27 PM
  #139
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by faye    
I thought i'd chip in here, someone quoted a conniextb being a good dressage horse earlier?
Well yes if you breed 2 athletic types of horse/pony you will get an athletic horse. Very different to a draft x. Connies are NOT drafts in any shape or way

Connies have a heck of a lot of spanish blood in them, they are also bred to be athletic ponies who can jump well (take a look at the UK 14.2hh pony showjumping teams lots and lots of connie blood there) and do well enough at dressage because they have the angles, athletasism and mind to do it. It is not uncommon for a purebred connie to be working at advanced medium with a half decent rider. (mine took me from pootling round the field to medium level and had I the skill and knowlege would have gone further, he did very very correct changes for fun)

The connie TB cross has been the corner post of many FEI PONY teams.

So sorry but I don't see how throwing a connie x in there supports your draft argument
Barry Godden mentioned his Connie x ID but I don't think anyone mentioned a connie x TB as a contender for a half Draft
     
    12-28-2012, 04:03 AM
  #140
Weanling
Can I just make a point that the term 'Draft' horse is quite confusing to some of us in the UK. We have Heavy Horses - which are the Clydes, Shires, Percherons, Belgians etc. Anything which is not a true 'heavy horse' is referred to as a cob or heavy cob. Now these can be anything from Gypsy horses to cross breeds which have a true heavy horse in their heritage. So when people on the forum describe their draft horse - I note that these are not always 'heavy horses' and could literally be any type of cross breed horse which is on the chunkier side. Please do correct me if I have got this totally wrong. It is just what I have picked up reading some posts.
     

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