do draft crosses show qualities that might make them good dressage horses? - Page 19 - The Horse Forum
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post #181 of 214 Old 12-28-2012, 06:11 PM
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I think it is time, before the entire thread is derailed. With that in mind, wouldn't you love to get your hands on this beauty and work some basic dressage.? As she gets older. Axeholme Shires - Axeholme Corvallis
What a beautiful looking horse. When you see a draft horse looking as good as that, it really does get up my nose when people rather snootily say "they can only do low level dressage". As I have said, drafts have only been doing dressage a short while in comparison to 'other types'. We are just waiting for the right hrose and the right rider to come along...I could see that beautiful horse in the picture making a lovely dressage horse. Better shut up now as apparently my posts have made people's eyes glaze over....!
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post #182 of 214 Old 12-28-2012, 06:17 PM
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Faye - below is the description of the Welsh Section C & D Cob
NO COLOURED HORSES!
Section D: The Welsh Cob
Aptly described as "the best ride and drive animal in the World", the Welsh Cob has been evolved throughout many centuries for his courage, tractability and powers of endurance.
The general character is the embodiment of strength, hardiness and agility. The head shows great quality with Pony character: bold prominent eyes, a broad forehead and neat, well set ears. The body must be deep, on strong limbs with good 'hard wearing' joints and an abundance of flat bone. Action must be straight, free and forceful, the knees should be bent and then the whole foreleg extended from the shoulders as far as possible in all paces, with the hocks well flexed, producing powerful leverage.
The Welsh Cob is a good hunter and a most competent performer in all competitive sports. In recent years they have had great success in the international driving world. Their abilities in all spheres are now fully recognised throughout the world.
The height should exceed 13.2 h.h. (137 cms): no upper limit.
Detailed Description of Sections C and D
General Character - Strong, hardy and active, with pony character and as much substance as possible
Colour - Any colour, except piebald and skewbald
Head - Full of quality and pony character. A coarse head and Roman nose are most objectionable
Eyes - Bold, prominent and set widely apart
Ears - Neat and well set
Neck - Lengthy and well carried. Moderately lean in the case of mares, but inclined to be cresty in the case of mature stallions
Shoulders - Strong but well laid back
Forelegs - Set square and not tied in at the elbows. Long, strong forearms. Knees well developed with an abundance of bone below them. Pasterns of proportionate slope and length. Feet well-shaped. Hoofs dense. When in the rough, a moderate quantity of silky feather is not objected to but coarse, wiry hair is a definite objection.
Middlepiece - Back and loins, muscular, strong and well-coupled. Deep through the heart and well-ribbed up.
Hind Quarters -Lengthy and strong. Ragged or drooping quarters are objectionable. Tail well-set on.
Hind Legs - Second thighs, strong and muscular. Hocks, large, flat and clean, with points prominent, turning neither inward nor outwards. The hind legs must not be too bent and the hock not set behind a line falling from the point of the quarter to the fetlock joint. Pasterns of proportionate slope and length. Feet well-shaped. Hoofs dense.
Action - Free, true and forcible. The knee should be bent and the whole foreleg should be extended straight from the shoulder and as far forward as possible in the trot. Hocks flexed under the body with straight and powerful leverage.
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post #183 of 214 Old 12-28-2012, 06:38 PM
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Tnavas - Were you maybe looking at the wrong photo - I'm sensing some crossed wires here as the welsh cob pic posted wasnt a coloured

Moving on - Its people using these big horses for riding that's going to ensure they don't become rare breeds (which the suffolk punch now is) or worse disapear altogether. Their use in agriculture is very limited to a few enthusiasts and as haulage animals about the same so anything that encourages people to own them has to be a good thing
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post #184 of 214 Old 12-28-2012, 06:41 PM
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Originally Posted by jaydee View Post
Tnavas - Were you maybe looking at the wrong photo - I'm sensing some crossed wires here as the welsh cob pic posted wasnt a coloured

Moving on - Its people using these big horses for riding that's going to ensure they don't become rare breeds (which the suffolk punch now is) or worse disapear altogether. Their use in agriculture is very limited to a few enthusiasts and as haulage animals about the same so anything that encourages people to own them has to be a good thing
Go back a few pages! Lovely bay heavy weight cob and a picture of a coloured gypsy pony
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post #185 of 214 Old 12-28-2012, 06:50 PM
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[QUOTE=FeatheredFeet;1817725]I think Tnavas, ideas about Cobs in general, have changed a great deal, since Summerhays published that book. Take Welsh Cobs for example.
Welsh Cob RWS 2012 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

I thought this was the welsh cob that Faye was referring too - not the coloured gypsy cob you posted along witht he pic of the show cob type
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post #186 of 214 Old 12-28-2012, 06:59 PM
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What a beautiful looking horse. When you see a draft horse looking as good as that, it really does get up my nose when people rather snootily say "they can only do low level dressage". As I have said, drafts have only been doing dressage a short while in comparison to 'other types'. We are just waiting for the right hrose and the right rider to come along...I could see that beautiful horse in the picture making a lovely dressage horse. Better shut up now as apparently my posts have made people's eyes glaze over....!

I have to admit, one of my issues with drafts is that I have this urge to shave their legs. I have never been a fan of the heavy feathering. This is inpart due to the mud. I think it looks miserable when they are full of mud lumps on their legs. Ha ha I also love a tidy looking horse but I will continue to fight that urge. Ha ha
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post #187 of 214 Old 12-28-2012, 07:06 PM
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INga - I so know how you feel - if at any point I start competing my Clydesdale in classes other than Clydesdale I will have to get oout the clippers
This is her in full feather and apicture of her as a 2yr old clipped out and plaited for her part in the stallion parade as progeny. The owner of the stallion wanted to show the versatility of the breed. Several people asked what she was crossed with and were stunned when told she was a purebred Clydie and tis is what is under the feather.

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post #188 of 214 Old 12-28-2012, 07:13 PM
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I hope nobody thought I had an idyllic view of Appleby Fair. It is far from that and unfortunately, always has been. While in recent years, the RSPCA has been cracking down on cruelty, it still goes on. My daughter witnessed the drowning of a horse in the river, in 2007. Even so and with the known cruelty, the enormous crowds of visitors, continue in larger numbers each year.

Wanted to add also, that we have many Gypsy Horses in the UK, the US and on the continent, who are competing in dressage and WP, plus other diciplines.

Lizzie
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post #189 of 214 Old 12-28-2012, 07:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Tnavas View Post
INga - I so know how you feel - if at any point I start competing my Clydesdale in classes other than Clydesdale I will have to get oout the clippers
This is her in full feather and apicture of her as a 2yr old clipped out and plaited for her part in the stallion parade as progeny. The owner of the stallion wanted to show the versatility of the breed. Several people asked what she was crossed with and were stunned when told she was a purebred Clydie and tis is what is under the feather.

I love how she looks clipped. They look almost... warmblood. Ha ha ha ha ha Granted, they do tend to get heavier as they get older but I have seen a few beautifully refined (without looking slight) drafts.
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post #190 of 214 Old 12-29-2012, 05:25 AM
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I love how she looks clipped. They look almost... warmblood. Ha ha ha ha ha Granted, they do tend to get heavier as they get older but I have seen a few beautifully refined (without looking slight) drafts.
Outrageous to clip a Clydesdales feather! No matter how tempted you are, don't do it. It's what makes them Clydedsales. If you don't want a feathered horse go get a Belgian or Percheron...I am now running for the hills with my two fully feathered Clydes...LOL
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