Do draft horses have bad attitudes? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

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post #11 of 33 Old 05-10-2011, 02:30 PM
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In the old days, when all drafts were purely used for work, it was important that they were unflappable, had a good solid work ethic and definitely not hot or nasty in any way. Those who were, certainly were not bred on in most cases. Hence the fact that even today, the majority of drafts are kind and willing.

Due to their size, obviously training is necessary, regarding one's space etc. There again, within each breed, one will probably find those who are a little more pushy than others. Generally though, drafts are known for their rather laid back attitude.

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post #12 of 33 Old 05-10-2011, 02:40 PM
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I've never worked with or ridden a draft horse, so I don't really know.

Though, as with any horse, it all depends on the bringing up and training of that horse. It's easy to name many characteristics of the breed, such as- all solid colours, but with temperment their all individuals, same breed or not.

Someone I know has worked closely with drafts and has had no bad experiences with the breed. He says they were all very sweet, well mannered and (on the whole) well behaved.

If your horse says no, you either asked the wrong question, or asked the question wrong.* ~Pat Parelli
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post #13 of 33 Old 05-10-2011, 02:46 PM
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There are many draft breeds and they are not all solid colours. Very few are in fact.

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post #14 of 33 Old 05-10-2011, 03:02 PM
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I would have to agree that most drafts that have bad attitudes can be completely blamed on humans. They are, by nature, more mellow and calmer (in general) but it is very important that they be taught proper respect when they are young. A slightly pushy draft is much more dangerous and intimidating than a slightly pushy standard horse.
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post #15 of 33 Old 05-10-2011, 03:50 PM
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My Clyde X is just a big dog also. The sweetest guy ever. You can go in with him when he is laying down, and he will just put his head in your lap. He can get a little heavy on the forehand sometimes, but again-that is a training issue.

He was a therapy horse at a therapeutic riding center, until his arthritis in his hocks got too bad.....

With regard to the leaning-One of my trainer friends who is also a farrier, does the same thing for any horse that leans. Just hold a hoof pick. The harder they lean, the more it pokes them, and they soon stop.

I have never had an issue with my guy-nor have I ever been charged more by a farrier like some people say they are.....

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post #16 of 33 Old 05-10-2011, 04:02 PM
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It is COMPLETELY dependant on the training. We bought a Paint x Clydesdale that had been treated as a pet his entire life, and he bit and kicked whenever he was asked to do anything. Needless to say, he didn't stay with us for very long. He's now in training with a great couple who have the time to re-train him from his spoiled mindframe.

But, right now we have a very nice 12-yr old Percheron who is absolutely a dream to work with. She is very sweet, respectful, and learns very quickly.....her temperament is great because she was raised right.
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post #17 of 33 Old 05-10-2011, 04:34 PM
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Originally Posted by equiniphile View Post
It is COMPLETELY dependant on the training. We bought a Paint x Clydesdale that had been treated as a pet his entire life, and he bit and kicked whenever he was asked to do anything. Needless to say, he didn't stay with us for very long. He's now in training with a great couple who have the time to re-train him from his spoiled mindframe.

But, right now we have a very nice 12-yr old Percheron who is absolutely a dream to work with. She is very sweet, respectful, and learns very quickly.....her temperament is great because she was raised right.
In some cases equinphile, I might agree, but not always. As you know, my daughter has Gypsy Horses and several have been imported. In the UK, many GHs are kept in large fields, for the majority of their lives and never handled.

If and when they become sold to the US and other countries, they are suddenly gathered up, given shots, halter on, loaded in a truck for a sometimes long trip to the airport, given a required bath by airport handlers (the first in their lives) and led up the ramp and into the plane for the long trip to the US.

Almost all, and of whatever age, take this all in their stride. Once in the US, they are again loaded in a truck and off to quarantine. Then another truck ride to the buyer's home. Some even have babies by side.

For most breeds it would not go nearly as easily. I have seen several movies of this from beginning to end and it still amazes me that these horses almost always, just go along with it all, as though they have been handled all their lives. I can't imagine doing this with many breeds - light or draft. Maybe it's why we love Gypsy Horses so much.

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post #18 of 33 Old 05-10-2011, 05:54 PM
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Originally Posted by franknbeans View Post
With regard to the leaning-One of my trainer friends who is also a farrier, does the same thing for any horse that leans. Just hold a hoof pick. The harder they lean, the more it pokes them, and they soon stop.
Sorry if this is a stupid question, but hold the hoof pick where? On the frog? Somewhere else?
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post #19 of 33 Old 05-12-2011, 01:34 AM
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Living with 12 Percherons I can only say good things about that particular breed.
Very sweet animals who seem to "think before they act" (most of the time ;) )
Very open minded and mellow-I absolutely adore them!!
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post #20 of 33 Old 05-12-2011, 09:28 PM
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Let's deal with him not respecting your space. Always carry a riding crop. Allow him a little more rope than the length of your arm and crop. As you walk start swinging the crop back to front. He really doesn't want to collide with it. If you hit him well you got his attention. Don't pet him or apologize or you've lost. Just start walking and swinging your crop. You may have to up your energy so the next time he gets a harder whack. To slow him down you can also swing the crop side to side in front of you. Don't worry about hurting him. If he walks over top of you it will be far worse pain and you'll be the one feeling it, not him.
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