The Forgotten Drafts - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 50 Old 11-18-2008, 06:48 PM
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I think drafts are so beautiful. I've never heard of most of those breeds. Thanks for today's enlightenment!
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post #22 of 50 Old 11-25-2008, 12:24 AM
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I think its funny that have a horse named after Vladamire (the real dracula)
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post #23 of 50 Old 02-03-2010, 04:44 PM
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The Auxois is gorgeous!
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post #24 of 50 Old 02-03-2010, 04:54 PM
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I,ve never seen or heard of most of them,but without a doubt,all fine animals. Are they still common in their original countries,or are they like the suffolk punch kept going by a few enthusiasts
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post #25 of 50 Old 02-03-2010, 05:47 PM
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I have always loved Suffolks. MUST. HAVE

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post #26 of 50 Old 02-03-2010, 06:45 PM
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FutureVetGirl wrote...

Quote:
Most of them have very easy names to pronounce. And those who have names that are a bit harder are the prettier and nicer ones (better, in my opinion, to Clydes, Shires, Vanners, and Percherons).
I like many of the heavy breeds, but what in your opinion, makes them "better" than Clydes, Shires and Percherons. (There isn't a breed called Vanners - it's the name of a registry and only horses registered within that registry, can be called "Vanners". The breed is known as Gypsy Horses or Gypsy Cobs.)

Better in conformation, colour, work ethic or ??

While some heavy breeds are interesting and well known in their own countries, many have not reached America yet and conformation is absolutely ghastly in many cases. Many sadly are still purely bred for meat.

Quote:
Noriker - it's the solid colored Gypsy Vanner... but prettier! Surprised not too many people know about them


Huh? Not even close to a Gypsy Horse and hopefully nobody in the breed would want a sickle-hocked rear like that. I was reading about Norikers on another forum recently and many were even worse in conformation, than the one you showed here. Certainly not a solid colour Gypsy Horse.

I do like the Suffolks and there is a huge push in the UK to preserve the breed, which has for a long time now, been critical.

We must also remember, that when a new breed arrives in the US, the Americans tend to want to immediately change it. Very few Shires today, bear any resemblance to the horses of 60-100 years ago unfortunately. And of course a while back, Shires and Clydesdales were one and the same breed. Today, they are much more leggy and refined. Brabants and Belgians have also now taken different courses in different countries, but were quite recently all one breed.

Australia has a Draft horse of it's own. Just haven't any pics right now.
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post #27 of 50 Old 02-03-2010, 07:08 PM
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I have actually heard of most of the drafts you put on the list. I do agree that I love the "rare" breeds of animals. Though I do want a Shire someday, I would love to have a draft that is actually almost identical to what it was a hundred years ago.
FeatheredFeet, I totally agree that in America we want tall, leggy, sleek, and refined on all our horses. I've seen Arabians that are 16-17 hands tall, and aside from the dished head, and flagging tail look more like TBs than Arabians. People also have a misconception that the jousting horses of ages past were what we would consider draft horses today, when in fact they were closer to the quarter horse in built and height. The armour used on jousting horses, that you see displayed in museums, would never fit a "full size draft" of today. It is very sad that some breed especially in America are losing touch with their true origins. American horses of all breeds are almost a new breed themselves because of the selective breeding we've done.
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post #28 of 50 Old 02-03-2010, 07:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FeatheredFeet View Post

Australia has a Draft horse of it's own. Just haven't any pics right now.
That would be the Australian Draught Horse.


Human toes are horses stress balls....


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post #29 of 50 Old 02-03-2010, 07:23 PM
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Thank you CC. Do you have a background on them?
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post #30 of 50 Old 02-03-2010, 07:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FeatheredFeet View Post
Thank you CC. Do you have a background on them?
Wikipedia is my friend. Not much info, I will keep looking.

Australian Draught Horse - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Human toes are horses stress balls....


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