OUt of interest: What to look for in a draft horse as a riding horse. - Page 3
 
 

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OUt of interest: What to look for in a draft horse as a riding horse.

This is a discussion on OUt of interest: What to look for in a draft horse as a riding horse. within the Draft Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • Shire cow hocks
  • Cow hocks in heavy horses

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    11-16-2012, 02:16 AM
  #21
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saranda    
Drafts do tend to have much bigger coats and they are more suitable for colder climates - are you sure a draft would feel good in the climate of South Africa?
I don't know, I never even thought of that. Perhaps that is one of the reasons they aren't more popular/common here.

Will they not adapt? Especially after a few generations having lived here already?
     
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    11-16-2012, 03:20 AM
  #22
Foal
I go to the draft horse festival every year in California, and this is just something I have perceived while walking around the barns. I am not trying to make generalizations or offend anyone, this is just what I have seen and the way it seems to me.

The percherons tend to be the 'hotter/antsier' of the draft breeds. This easily could have been the barn that they came from or their trainer etc. However, at the draft festival all the barns are open to visitors etc, and every year the percherons are the ones that are pacing in their stalls, trying to nip people, neighing, etc. Obviously, they are still very sweet horses, but they seem to make more of a fuss than the other draft horse breeds.
     
    11-16-2012, 03:37 AM
  #23
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mariss    
I go to the draft horse festival every year in California, and this is just something I have perceived while walking around the barns. I am not trying to make generalizations or offend anyone, this is just what I have seen and the way it seems to me.

The percherons tend to be the 'hotter/antsier' of the draft breeds. This easily could have been the barn that they came from or their trainer etc. However, at the draft festival all the barns are open to visitors etc, and every year the percherons are the ones that are pacing in their stalls, trying to nip people, neighing, etc. Obviously, they are still very sweet horses, but they seem to make more of a fuss than the other draft horse breeds.
Could be a valid point... I'm sure no one will find it offending.

Percheron's aren't my favourites, just aesthetic wise, I like the look of clydesdales as they are leggier.
     
    11-16-2012, 06:03 AM
  #24
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by FeatheredFeet    
Bluebird, I actually still don't consider the 'set' required on good Gypsies, the same as true cow hocks, one sees in many breeds. I always thought other draft breeds also called this type rear leg, a 'set'. Maybe it's just a Gypsy thing. I used to have a really good pic, showing a set, vs a cow hock. I knew Jeff had written something about it a long time ago. I finally dug it up. You can see it here...

Conformation in the Gypsy Horse

I did incidentally, see something someone had written a while ago, deploring the 'set' required on Gypsies and presumably, what is called and required as cow hocks, in other drafts. Can't find it now. If I do, I'll post a link to it.

Lizzie
Hi Lizzie,
'Cow Hocks' apply only to Clydesdale horses and is a breed requirement. It does not apply to any other horse as a 'breed standard'. I cannot comment on conformations for Gypsy Vanners or generic draft breeds and crosses as these are not classed as a true breed in the UK and I know nothing about them apart from the fact that they can be stunning horses to look at. So unless you are asking about a Shire (cow hocks a fault), a Suffolk Punch (cow hocks a fault), Percheron (cow hocks a fault) or a Clydesdale (cow hocks are a requirement), then I genuinely can't comment. 'Sets' is not a term we use in the UK as it means something totally different.
     
    11-16-2012, 06:08 AM
  #25
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by muumi    
I don't know, I never even thought of that. Perhaps that is one of the reasons they aren't more popular/common here.

Will they not adapt? Especially after a few generations having lived here already?
Heavy horses are no different to any other type of horse growing a winter coat. If its too hot, you can actually clip them just like any other type of horse. There is no difference except it takes longer. Heavy horses were not necessarily bred just to work in colder climates. They are used all over the world e.g. Australia, USA, UK, Europe and even in the UK summer temperatures can reach 30C - 34C in the shade. Horses find shade and some will enjoy a cold shower at the end of the day too! LOL
     
    11-18-2012, 06:03 PM
  #26
Foal
I would like to point out that there are already (French) Percheron draft horses in South Africa, and have been bred there for a few generations. There also is a breeder down there who just imported a few more horses from France to the area. So while it might seem newer than most, Percherons are in South Africa.

Percheron SA | Home Page

I believe this is the place that just did the importing. Summerwind Percheron Stud / Summerwind Percheron Stoet
     
    11-18-2012, 11:50 PM
  #27
Weanling
Thanks Bodi for the information. I am aware that there are some draft breeders in SA, I've been looking into it.
I am actually more interested in a clydesdale or a shire horse though specifically..
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    11-25-2012, 11:38 AM
  #28
Weanling
Buy a Clydesdale if you can and you will never regret it. They are a rare breed though (in the UK) so not that many around. They are really lovely horses and look fabulous in the dressage ring or out ploughing! It may be worth looking into the cost of shipping (importing) if you can't find one in SA. It really depends on what you are looking for and how much you are willing to spend. A good quality Clydesdale broken to ride as a 4 or 5 year old would set you back around 3K in the UK. However, a colt unbroken will cost around 900. You would then need to add shipping which could be approximately 600 - 1000K but shop around. Ireland is a good place to start your search for a Scottish horse! LOL That's where both of my boys came from and although they did cost me in import, I don't regret one penny. They are just the nicest, gentlest and biggest pair of puppy dogs on the planet.
     

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