PMU colts are good christmas presents! - Page 2
   

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PMU colts are good christmas presents!

This is a discussion on PMU colts are good christmas presents! within the Draft Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category

     
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        12-11-2008, 06:20 PM
      #11
    Foal
    What if anything in particular did you find to be the bigest difference between PMU foals and their counterparts? Aside from a few hundred pounds. I'm reinforcing his double wide stall this week and don't plan on letting him out until I can stand in there and play nicely with him. Its to cold and rainy down here to risk him not wanting to go back in. Oh, as far as wild foals and fencing. Does anyone think they will have ANY respect for wire/electric?
         
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        12-11-2008, 06:42 PM
      #12
    Showing
    Training them temper wise is not really to different than training an untouched lighter bred foal but you have to keep in mind the tempers are different and again the size. It's different trying to teach a untouched draft to lead vs a light bred horse. If you try to teach them something and they say no then you need to find ways around it.
    I suggest working with drafts before jumping into getting a PMU.
         
        12-14-2008, 09:50 PM
      #13
    Yearling
    My PMU colt came halter broke at 6 mos, IF you could catch him :) Initially we had to heard him into a stall, then you could slowly and carefully halter him. Once you had a halter on him, you could lead him but had to handle him very cautiously. If I tried to catch him out in the corral, he would flee and frantically race back and forth and try to climb the fence. Once he was at my home and had no other horses to hang out with, he bonded with us quickly so I would suggest not letting your new baby in with any other horses until he's comfortable with you or he might bond with them instead of you. We used lots of carrots (he didn't know what apples were at first) and scratches and sometimes just sitting there in the corral reading a book or something so he could check us out. I would say training him hasn't been any different than light horses except that he is less flighty and loves to be with me. He's about 17.3 now so I'm really glad I got him when he was smaller and I got a handle on him. As long as you've been around horses and understand how to use groundwork to make him comfortable, you should be fine.
         
        01-06-2009, 11:31 PM
      #14
    Foal
    Okay thanks guys. I'm feeling better about this. I've had a chance to work with and train with a number of draft horses as well as lighter horses, some of which where abused, so I believe I can keep my cool and patience while convincing him I'm not a horse eating monster. The draft techniques can obviously control him, I will have to learn with practice what ammount of strength he'll need to behave, but our stall work before going outside should provide a safe place to learn that. I'm glad to hear that its better to seperate him fror other horses to bond with me, I was afraid the move from massive herd to single pasture would be traumatic. My current schedule affords me the chance to work with him in short bursts throughout the day, or sit quietly for long lengths of time. I'm very excited. I can't wait to see how big he's grown since the last picture I recieved.
         
        01-10-2009, 02:12 PM
      #15
    Yearling
    When does he arrive?? Soon, right? How exciting!! My Cody never really appeared traumatized, didn't whinny for anyone after he was brought to me. At the ranch he came from, he was in a large herd. He still isn't really herd bound although if I take him out by himself, he'll let out a couple whinnies, nothing desperate though. When I first got him (first horse after 12 yrs. Without having kids) I was so excited to have him that I'd go out at 3 in the morning just to make sure he was OK and silly things like that :) My kids just adore him, even though he's 17.3, he's their "baby!" He still has a big baby face too.
         

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