Balancing horse while in two-point
   

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Balancing horse while in two-point

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  • Do you post while two pointing
  • Two point horse

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  • 2 Post By MyBoyPuck

 
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    12-02-2012, 07:57 PM
  #1
Yearling
Balancing horse while in two-point

I am battling the "creeping heel" problem and my instructor suggested a little two-point to stretch my legs and help with heels down. I admit it's not something I do that often outside of lessons, but while practicing on my own today, I noticed it seemed like my mare was having some trouble balancing us while I was up in two-point. I could feel her physically stumble on the front end underneath me, and hear her pounding away on the forehand. I have every reason to believe I was probably perched too far forward and sticking my bum way out, so that could certainly be the bulk of the problem. I don't have my hands resting on her neck or anything, I can carry myself, but it still seems clear I've messed with the center of gravity.

Does anyone have any advice for helping my mare stay more balanced while I'm working on this exercise to get my leg in a better position? Her biggest problem right now is being too heavy on the forehand and not working from behind, so I certainly don't want to make her problems worse while trying to work on myself, which seems so counterproductive.

Unfortunately I don't have any pics/vid right now, but maybe someone could post *good* examples on position to avoid a heavy-on-the-forehand horse while riding in two-point, and I can have a good mental image going into my next ride. What suggestions do you all have for me?
     
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    12-02-2012, 09:08 PM
  #2
Weanling
I don't have any pictures of me just chillin' in my 2-point, so these pictures over smaller jumps would be the most similar; long lower leg and chest up =] I like to think of it as pushing your butt back, because I used to come too far over the pommel of my saddle, too, and be unbalanced. So just think, butt back, chest up.
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    12-07-2012, 10:18 PM
  #3
Trained
What about trying the stretch by standing straight up in the stirrups instead of two point? It would still let your heels and calves stretch out and you cannot possibly cheat and end up over your horse's shoulders since you will just fall forward. You literally stand straight up. If you fall back or forward, you're not in the right place. Just keep playing with it at the walk until you find the balance point and walk around as much as you can without holding on for balance. Once you can do that, almost sit down (two point) and resume the two point trotting exercise which should put you in a better balanced point for your horse.
egrogan and Herdof2 like this.
     
    12-08-2012, 08:40 AM
  #4
Yearling
Thanks, Puck. Great suggestion. I do the stand up straight thing when I first get on, but more as a stretch. I like the idea of doing it while she's moving too. Thanks!
     
    12-14-2012, 12:17 AM
  #5
Foal
Rather unorthodox but you could ride is ankle exercise weights. It will stretch your heel without forcing it down and helps with body awareness.
     

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