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Bute Legalized?

This is a discussion on Bute Legalized? within the Dressage forums, part of the English Riding category
  • Are dressage horses more prone to arthiritis

 
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    11-23-2009, 04:22 PM
  #31
Trained
Quote:
So Honaysuga, you are suggesting that instead of having my 50 year old mother (who has been riding for about 5 years (10 years on and off)) on a quiet schoolmaster who is a little arthritic, I should put her on a young, inexperienced horse with no lameness issues??
Lol! I'm pretty sure she is saying your mother should be on a quiet schoolmaster who ISN'T a little arthritic. They do exist.
     
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    11-23-2009, 04:23 PM
  #32
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by wild_spot    
Lol! I'm pretty sure she is saying your mother should be on a quiet schoolmaster who ISN'T a little arthritic. They do exist.
For $50,000 which I'm not about to spend on a horse that will have no resale value in 10 years.
     
    11-23-2009, 04:26 PM
  #33
Trained
Anabel, just curious and no snark intended, but what exactly makes a dressage horse more prone to soundness issues/arthritis than any other performance horse?
     
    11-23-2009, 05:49 PM
  #34
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spastic_Dove    
Anabel, just curious and no snark intended, but what exactly makes a dressage horse more prone to soundness issues/arthritis than any other performance horse?
not anebel, but ill take a stab ;)
The degree of collection that a top level horse requires is a lot of pressure on their joints, particularily the hind.
I wouldn't say that a dressage horse is more prone to soundness issues than other disciplines - im sure the top level jumpers have the same, if not more problems. But keep in mind that most top jumpers rarely jump their horses more than 1-2 times a week at that level. Whereas with dressage riders, they are continuously riding and asking for that degree of collection
     
    11-23-2009, 06:56 PM
  #35
Green Broke
~*~anebel~*~ Honestly in my opinion, if you like it or not, an arthritic horse should not have to compete just because your arthritic mother wants to, that's not fair,If your mother cannot ride a sound animal she shouldn't be riding. Wild_spot, yes that is what I meant exactly, thanks, I would have cleared that up sooner but I have been out of town. And I agree also with whoever said that as a responsible owner you should know when it is time to retire hour horse from competing, even if its o fun for you, horses aren't toys for our enjoyment.
I guess what I meant to say in my looong post I will say here without all the fluff, I agree with bute being legalized for sound athletes, but the horse should have a clean vet check before bute is administered to make sure problems aren't being attemptedly masked by the drug. Old and/or arthritic horses shouldn't be drugged just so they can be used to compete without the proper care and strict scheduling it takes to keep them, they have done their time and deserve a break, old arthritic moms or not. Im speaking for ethical ownership of competition animals here, not for the people who ride them.
     
    11-23-2009, 07:53 PM
  #36
Green Broke
Compleatly agree with you anabel. Our eventing horses are under ALOT of stress even at the lower levels, and we do everything to keep them as sound as posible, but we also might need a little help with that school master whose done it a million time and gets a little stiff in his joints. A horse that is compleatly sound at home might/probably will get stiff after a good while in the trailer and then being in a stall 24/7. Almost all competition horses have a little arthritis in their bones. Do you know what arthritis is? It's deterioration of the cartalige that cusions the joints between your bones, so any athleate will have a little becuase of the extreme stress put on your joints. So I wouldn't be suprised if your horse has arthristis, but just doesn't show many signs of it. And again, a gram of bute will not cover serious lameness.
     
    11-23-2009, 08:29 PM
  #37
Yearling
Quote:
it is nearly impossible to keep a dressage horse sound.
Oh but don't worry,when that happens we can just bute them :)











     
    11-23-2009, 09:16 PM
  #38
Trained
Quote:
Almost all competition horses have a little arthritis in their bones.
Not true. I know MANY competition horses who are perfectly sound in their old age.

Quote:
For $50,000 which I'm not about to spend on a horse that will have no resale value in 10 years.
So you bought the horse with arthritis because it was cheaper? Think maybe that it was a good reason for it to be cheaper?

You can get a good schoolmaster in any discipline where I live for under $20,000.
     
    11-23-2009, 10:11 PM
  #39
Started
Guys, guys, guys - a horse can have arthritis and not be lame from it, ya know. I believe the majority of competition horses that might have arthritis setting in fall into this category...

Plus, I'm a big believer in listening to your horse. If they are behaving in a way that you know they are not happy with their job anymore... time for retirement. But, if you can manage your older horse and they are still willing to train/show/whatever, go for it... they just take a little longer to warm-up.
     
    11-24-2009, 12:08 AM
  #40
Green Broke
Honeysuga- I agree, when a horse can no longer do their job due to soundness they deserve either retirement from that level of competition or a career altogether depending on the severity. They are not toys and blue ribbons should not be fought for at all costs. BUT, the problem with what you're suggesting has a looooooot of "grey" and very little black and white.

We have an 17 y/o hunter at our barn who is a lovely beginner friendly horse who is teaching his kid the ropes of the show world. He goes around and happily does his job, just like he's supposed to. He xrays decently, flexions perfectly, doesn't refuse, never a lame step. His stride is a little shorter then it used to be since he was, say, 8. But vet says he's in great shape for his age and has many many more beginner years left ahead, completely supported purchasing him. Should he be retired because he gets a little stiff at shows without a little bute?

What horse -even the younger non arthritic ones- doesn't benefit from a little anti-inflammatory to help them compete at the BEST of their ability at an upper level show environment? Dang it I took an Aleve every day of the show last week and I'm only 30...
     

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