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Classical Dressage

This is a discussion on Classical Dressage within the Dressage forums, part of the English Riding category

     
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        11-06-2010, 01:39 AM
      #11
    Started
    ^ yes! You are welcome to borrow it...it is a really beautiful book w/great illustrations and explanations on classical dressage.
         
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        11-06-2010, 01:47 AM
      #12
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Piaffe    
    ^ yes! You are welcome to borrow it...it is a really beautiful book w/great illustrations and explanations on classical dressage.


    Awesome,that would be great! I don't have any books like that..mom does but she is reading them. I will take good care of it...and I like pictures..lol...
         
        11-09-2010, 07:10 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Phillipe Karl is by far the best current classical horseman that I have come across at this time, if you can get hold of his book "Twisted Truths of Modern Dressage" then it will explain to you the best way of passively training your horse, regardless of his shape, breeding or temperament, in a way that is clear and can be easily understood by both horse and rider. This book is so unique because it gives a step by step guide, emphasising that if you experience any problems in, e.g. The flying change, then you return to the previous (or even first) step which the horse accepted and was comfortable with. This eliminates instructions and assumptions such as "your horse should just change" and "half half, half halt and kick harder" when the horse doesnt change. The aim of this book, although it explains all high level movements, is designed to improve the rider's awareness of their own aids and train in an educated manner that makes it easy for the horse to understand.

    If you want to improve your theoretical knowledge of correct and classical techniques then this is definitely the book for you!
         
        11-09-2010, 08:51 PM
      #14
    Super Moderator
    I am thrilled to see that another rider has read and appreciates Mr. Karls "Twisted Truths" book. I found it fascinating. It is, however, not the best book for rank beginners, in my opinion. This is because he is contrasting what is so often taught or sought in modern competition circles to what has been written by the masters. If one is not familiar with basic dressage terminology or exersizes, it may be confusing. Also, as it is writtne in French and translated into English, it doesn't alway read as clearly as some texts.
    On the other hand, I can't think of another text off hand that I would recommend above it. Hm m.
    I guess I just wanted to say to the OP that the book you are recommending is not all that easy to comprehend or digest, especially if it's your first expposure to dressage concepts.
         
        11-09-2010, 09:19 PM
      #15
    Started
    Also the book "tug of war between modern and classical dressage" is a great book too! Very recommended!
         
        11-12-2010, 06:38 PM
      #16
    Foal
    Then there's the true classic: The Complete Training of Horse and Rider by Alois Podhajsky.

    This is a book that is excellent to read. Even if you don't understand everything, read it through. In your riding/learning process, as you actually experience some of the concepts have read about, you will already have a degree of understanding because of what you have read.

    There are many schools of thought regarding dressage and you need to form your own opinions and decide which one is more to your liking. You will hear, "movement before balance" and you will also hear "balance before movement." There is the "German school" and the "French school" -- a lot of stuff that can be confusing to someone just entering the world of dressage.

    If you want to learn dressage contact your local dressage association and find out highly regarded trainers in your area. Not all dressage trainers are created equal. There are many "out there" who can talk a good game but few who can truly deliver -- particularly on the 'net.' And read books by the highly regarded ODGs, that way you can't go wrong.
         
        11-21-2010, 02:24 PM
      #17
    Foal
    I try on the basis of the old master to ride. We in Germany have a small forum www.klassikreiten.de. Look, that is a interesting site: http://www.artisticdressage.com/welcome.html
         
        11-21-2010, 02:52 PM
      #18
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Klara    
    I try on the basis of the old master to ride. We in Germany have a small forum www.klassikreiten.de. Look, that is a interesting site: Welcome to Artistic Dressage - Dedicated to the Preservation and Promotion of the Art of Classical Dressage
    Klara,
    The interesting thing that arises when discussing classical dressage is the degree of disagreement that arises.
    I used to be a member of the artistic dressage forum, however, the venomus attacks leveled at me because I did not school their way was uncalled for. I school traditional, though I do not take hold of my horses and force them to submit, instead I release them and ask them to make the decision. The result is a simpliar and faster learning process for the horse.
    The masters had great knowledge however, knowledge should not be stagnant.
         
        11-22-2010, 12:20 AM
      #19
    Foal
    Quote:
    The masters had great knowledge however, knowledge should not be stagnant.

    That also is my opinion . Ride on the competitive level it is much to make the money and win.For the training of horses allows little time is taken. The path of classical dressage is longer, but in the sense of the horses.
         
        11-27-2010, 01:31 PM
      #20
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by spirithorse8    
    Klara,
    ...I school traditional, though I do not take hold of my horses and force them to submit, instead I release them and ask them to make the decision. ...
    I know that this is one of the things that makes some people furious. It sounds just too...woo-woo... But my angle is that I only want to do what my horse wants, and THAT could be construed "making the decision." I do not believe this is a truly classical-- old-- approach. The ancients needed more control in their lives (I believe.) But I think it's an improvement!

    But for this to work, you need a strong bond (another concept that gets people angry!)-- I think of us as a herd. What horse won't run off when the herd bolts? It doesn't matter if she's tired, or hungry, or even sore. When I present (as I'm doing now) the counter-canter, my horse says she can't; I'm asking her to "run with me" on boggy ground...I ask her to try, because I know she can, and she does try. So long as she keeps trying, the herd is together; it is my responsibility to know when to stop, and when we need to keep trying. (That's the hard part!) But when she does learn something, and I present the opportunity for her to "go for it" the energy really comes from her, it's not re-active but voluntary, and, in my opinion, more beautiful than simply a well-schooled obedient horse. Much more fun too.
         

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