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Dressage horse?

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  • Isabell lipit horse
  • Daisy cutter pacing horses

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    04-07-2012, 05:36 PM
  #21
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by StellaIW    
Nowadays, dressage in competition, you have to put on a show to get high scores. It's not enough with a horse
That does all the right things, like a Lipizzaner. I really don't know what to think of that.
You're right. It has become a show rather than a judgment of correct movement.

There is a reason why there is a split between academic and competitive dressage.
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    04-07-2012, 05:38 PM
  #22
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by soenjer55    
Agreed!
As for him being a reining horse, no, I don't think he's built for it. He's pretty darn cute, though. I want to hug him with the fluffy coat... lol.
But surely any horse can do reining maneuvers? I've seen her do sliding stops when galloping around a field, and she can certainly spin, as she has done when spooking at something. Why should it be limited to QHs and paints?
     
    04-07-2012, 05:45 PM
  #23
Trained
As I explained in one of my original posts, ML - the lipizzaner is bred for collection. In general, the breed finds the collected work easier. However, it is not bred for extension of the paces, which is its downfall competitively.

As for the photo of Anky - why is it that all novices want to use Anky as their argument about this 'modern dressage' hoohah and, much to my amusement, about warmbloods?
How is it the fault of the warmblood that it is ridden badly? Salinero is in fact a highly talented individual. Unfortunately his rider uses some questionable methods in her training. Should you be keeping up to date with current scoring and place getters, you will notice that FEI scoring is taking a swing the other way. Finally away from the short necked, tight backed, incorrect work, and is scoring the lose, correct combinations far more favourably. One cannot judge a breed by how it is ridden.
How about the arab I saw the other day, with it's head so high in the air that it was hitting it's rider in the face, bouncing along with its hind legs tracking more than 1m behind it's front legs. Therefore, ALL arabs must go like that.
It is a moot point how the horse is ridden.

As far as it all being a show to score highly. If the horse with the 3 stunning paces works just as correctly as the lipit, that does not have great paces - of course it will score higher.
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    04-07-2012, 05:48 PM
  #24
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayty    
As far as it all being a show to score highly. If the horse with the 3 stunning paces works just as correctly as the lipit, that does not have great paces - of course it will score higher.
That is true!

And if you have a horse with stunning paces, you'll be able to get away with a few mistakes and still score high!
     
    04-07-2012, 05:52 PM
  #25
Trained
Not necessarily. I've certainly been canned for some simple mistakes when competing on some pretty flashy horses. I've been beaten by a 15hh downhill quarter horse because it went quietly and accurately, while my young horse was very nervous and tight over the back, so the paces looked very flashy, but the hind legs were not there. I was scored exactly as I would have expected to be scored in that instance.
     
    04-07-2012, 05:58 PM
  #26
Weanling


I guess it's a bit different over here then. Not all the judges do it, but a lot, especially in dressage competitions for ponies.
     
    04-07-2012, 06:07 PM
  #27
Trained
Pony dressage over here is only in its very early stages - not many judges actually know how to score the ponies, so the marking is a bit chaotic. The grand prix competition, is sometimes marked a little 'interesting' depending on the judge - the Australian judges don't seem to have so much bias, but there's been times when we've had judges come over from Europe, recently from PSI in Germany, and the winning horses were those that had been imported from that stud.
So yes, there can be some bias judging around.
But I have found in the national levels, as opposed to the FEI, it tends to be overall fairly marked, not many times I watch a competition and feel angry about how it was placed. Sometimes the scores are all too generous, or all too low, but generally, the placings are about accurate to where I would put them - and no, I can't stand the flicky, flashy 'daisy cutter' paces when horses go with tight backs. I would much rather place a cute little quarter horse that swings it back and goes accurately, above that :)
     
    04-07-2012, 06:31 PM
  #28
Weanling
I understand.

Over here,we have amazing ponies! With amazing paces. Some of them look like warmblood horses.

Like this one;

This is intresting; this pony scored 67,22%, 54,72% and 68,61% on the same ride.


It's a pony and rider training for the same trainer as I am, She's super tiny, about 135 cm I guess.
     
    04-07-2012, 06:37 PM
  #29
Foal
Well I would like to say I'm no novice and painted black in that case doesn't show me collection. And also not just anky isabel werth and many others train like it. As I also stated before MOST of all horses show over collection in upper level dressage not just anky. Go to any arab horse show you would find most all of the horses have there heads in correct position. (And yes if it is in saddleseat or country pleasure its head is high) therefore you can judge the breeds head position if I see most upper level horses heads are held wrong I can draw a conclusion that there is to much being asked if you to that making your horse carry its head like that. Maybe its just me but for an arab to be able to do I must say every other discipline of horse riding I don't see how it is so unfit for dressage because warmbloods are a mix of arab or thoroughbred and a cold blood draft so something must be seen in them to be breed to create an excellent dressage horse.
     
    04-07-2012, 07:08 PM
  #30
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by thesilverspear    
But surely any horse can do reining maneuvers? I've seen her do sliding stops when galloping around a field, and she can certainly spin, as she has done when spooking at something. Why should it be limited to QHs and paints?
It's not- there are reining arabians and reining appaloosas. If you breed the qualities necessary into any breed of horse, you can have a reiner. But, like kayty has stated about dressage, there are breeds bred for it specifically, I.e. The QH and paint, therefore they will dominate it like warmbloods dominate dressage. There are strains of arabians bred for reining, and appys bred for reining, but only certain strains- the QH especially, I'd say more so than even the paint, on the whole, is catered towards reining and western sports. That's why they excel in it.
I'm sure she can turn and stop, so can my sister's trakhener, who has stopped so quickly my sister sommersaulted over his head (he's almost 17 hands... she was pretty sore for a while LOL). But against my QH, he can't come close- Jake, her horse, is uphill, and excelled in jumping/ dressage because of it. Gerri, my QH, is more level/ downhill (pretty close) and 14 hands, with a powerful hind- he can turn so fast I don't even know what happened. Overall, if both of these horses got the same training, eventually Gerri would beat Jake, the higher they went in reining.
With proper training, you could do low level of any discipline on any horse. But as for high-level reining, she's not built for it, like reining-bred quarter horses and paints. You didn't say that you wanted to started reining with her, you said that you wanted to seriously get into it- which means you want to go to the high levels, right? Don't take what I say as discouragement towards the entire idea, it would be great to try reining on her, but although she's a lovely mare, she would not hold up in the higher levels.
Thank you for taking the time to read this, and hearing out my opinion. :)
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breeds of horses, dressage horse, horses, warmblood

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