Dressage through the decades. - Page 2
 
 

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Dressage through the decades.

This is a discussion on Dressage through the decades. within the Dressage forums, part of the English Riding category
  • Jan duffy dressage
  • Calmers for dressage horse in nz

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    12-27-2011, 01:34 PM
  #11
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder    
Not sure Spyder what I am supposed to be seeing on this page.

The origin of the warmblood was the army remounts, they wanted horses that were strong, sane, easy to keep but were somewhat lighter on their feet and with more agility and speed. To get this they crossed the farm working horses (coldbloods) with TB's and Arabians (Hotbloods) and developed a warmblood - mix of hot and cold! In the UK these were refered to as Hunters.

The horses were named after the area they were developed in. Most of the studs being government controlled the type became quite a true type. Warmblood is actually a relitively new term for these horses - they were always refered to by there area of origin.

The modern warmblood can now be bred outside of these areas but to be registered as a particular 'type' still have to be examined by the governing body or their representitive.

I breed New Zealand warmbloods - 1st cross - back to the basics, producing a strong, versatile, sane, active horse that should be able to do any discipline with success.
     
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    12-27-2011, 02:02 PM
  #12
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tnavas    
To get this they crossed the farm working horses (coldbloods) with TB's and Arabians (Hotbloods) and developed a warmblood - mix of hot and cold!

What I am saying is the mare base that developed into the warm bloods we now see were not just drafts TB and Arab. The mare base was a hodge podge of many many different types. Some were more from the lighter desert types like the Andalusian/Arab and Barb and other breeds that are almost not available now. Some looked more draft and a lot were of the carriage type.

So many DIFFERENT breeds were in the mixture that you simply cannot say the WB came from draft/TB/Arab crosses.

That is why trying this mixture in NA will fail as the soup base cannot be duplicated. We CAN however develop our own type of WB unique to NA but can never be compared to the European WB..EVER.
     
    12-27-2011, 02:14 PM
  #13
Yearling
Spyder - the horses used in the early days of breeding the war horse were farm/draft/carriage horses. They weren't the mix that we see now but the everday horses that were used to work the farms prior to motorised transport. Eg
This filly yearling is half Clydesdale half TB
     
    12-27-2011, 02:24 PM
  #14
Weanling
I want to hear more about the changes in dressage as a sport, not about Warmblood history. Subbing.
     
    12-27-2011, 02:53 PM
  #15
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by MicKey73    
I want to hear more about the changes in dressage as a sport, not about Warmblood history. Subbing.

Its for everything Mickey, including how the horse's have changed to 'suit' or even unsuit our needs as riders- as has been mentioned twice they're not so much 'amatuer' friendly anymore... is that because we've refined the the horse's too much, asking for too much perfection rather than looking at practicality?

Though lol, to be fair, I'm not overly interested in what the first brood mare was.. Tvanas, if you look in to this European Warmblood registries

It may be more of a topic for what you want to discuss?
     
    12-27-2011, 03:08 PM
  #16
Weanling
Sorry Duffy, I didn't mean for it to come off snappy at all . It just seems that every time 'Warmblood' comes up in a thread we have to rehash what is or is not a warmblood, where they came from, blablabla. I'm a dressage newbie too, and think this is a very interesting thread... I'll go back to the observation deck now....
     
    12-27-2011, 03:09 PM
  #17
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by MicKey73    
I want to hear more about the changes in dressage as a sport, not about Warmblood history. Subbing.
The warmblood is one of the main influences on the change in dressage and the origin of these horses also influences the outcome of breeding for dressage.
     
    12-27-2011, 03:17 PM
  #18
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by MicKey73    
Sorry Duffy, I didn't mean for it to come off snappy at all . It just seems that every time 'Warmblood' comes up in a thread we have to rehash what is or is not a warmblood, where they came from, blablabla. I'm a dressage newbie too, and think this is a very interesting thread... I'll go back to the observation deck now....
No no, I didn't mean that as a 'get back in your box' at all! You're half right, it was digressing a bit, but then its interesting to see how the horses have developed too
     
    12-27-2011, 03:46 PM
  #19
Yearling
I think it all ties together anyway. As European warmbloods get hotter and less "amateur friendly," that leaves a space in the horse market for calmer, more forgiving dressage horses. Even I can remember when people in the Western states of the US weren't riding either one.

To speculate wildly, I think it has a lot to do with how people's expectations of what a dressage horse should be have changed, which has a lot to do with the success and dominance of the warmblood. And subsequently, for the popularity of the draft cross as a dressage horse, which looks a little bit more warmblood-ish than an Arab or Appy or what have you.

Why did the warmblood and its way of moving become the dominant dressage paradigm in North America? Why not the Iberian horses? There's a question.
     
    12-28-2011, 03:12 PM
  #20
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~    
And the ones that do make it in international dressage are rarely ones that can be retired to an Amatuer... they are still barely broke even after the GP and require a very sensitive, compassionate rider...

This is a very interesting point, I hadn't even considered that. Makes sense.

I'm surprised it hasn't been mentioned but another development in the last 15 years alone is the internet! More than ever before, people who really want to learn and do well have more opportunity to uncover information needed. Bad practices that people may have taken as the norm before because their trainer "said so" can be pointed out and challenged. Suggestions on literature for the serious student can be found.

Sure, there's good and bad in there. But definitely shifted riding for me and many others I know.

Thesilverspear - I'm not totally familiar with Iberians, but aren't they known for having a lot of front action and not a lot of back action?
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