Encouraging a horse to come up and carry himself straight
 
 

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Encouraging a horse to come up and carry himself straight

This is a discussion on Encouraging a horse to come up and carry himself straight within the Dressage forums, part of the English Riding category
  • Dressage allowing your horse to come up in front
  • Helping a horse carry himself

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    12-01-2013, 02:41 PM
  #1
Green Broke
Encouraging a horse to come up and carry himself straight

I've recently had a few very very good lessons with a new dressage trainer, Reeco has come on leaps and bounds.

We have worked on the trot and on getting me to sit up, our canter transition is miles better than it was and the pony is much much more in front of my leg and forwards.

However pony just wont carry himself in the canter, he falls in through his inside shoulder and motorbikes round a shoulder. He is horrificly crooked in canterand the downward transition is horrific.
My instructor has given me a few exercises to practice between now and my next lesson (in the new year) and I'm under strict instructions to hack him our A LOT when I take him home for christmas and get him working up some of those big welsh hills, however has anyone else got and exerises that may help?

I'm not too worried about the downwards transition as I think thatis a symptom of him not being balanced in the canter so he has no chance of being balanced in the downwards transition and when he is more balanced in the canter the transition will improve.
     
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    12-01-2013, 03:03 PM
  #2
Super Moderator
Find a Ride With Your Mind RI, mine has transformed my motorbiking TB and me, best thing I ever did for my riding Even though I have ridden for over 40 years, I was utterly amazed at the changes she made in made in a very short time and how things made sense.
Corporal likes this.
     
    12-02-2013, 10:35 AM
  #3
Super Moderator
Can you find somewhere to school where they have mirrors?
Quite often crookedness in the horse comes from crookedness in the rider that we often don't realize we have but can be enough to affect a horses balance
I was at a clinic recently when one riders problem with her horse was instantly solved by the trainer telling her she was dropping her shoulder to one side
Downwards transitions that go pear shaped are often caused by a failure to ride the horse forwards into the transition - the correct balanced halt being one of the biggest issues with a lot of riders
     
    12-02-2013, 10:37 AM
  #4
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydee    
Quite often crookedness in the horse comes from crookedness in the rider that we often don't realize we have but can be enough to affect a horses balance
I was at a clinic recently when one riders problem with her horse was instantly solved by the trainer telling her she was dropping her shoulder to one side

Yes, this is exactly what RWYM is all about as well.
     
    12-02-2013, 02:50 PM
  #5
Yearling
OP this exact same thing was happening with my boy, and with one quick glance from a wonderful horsewoman she said I was riding too much the down stride and not enough the up stride- now this seems blaring my obvious as it's pretty basic, but somehow over time I must have been focusing less and less on myself and turning all of it to how my horse was going- silly of me. But with a little tweaking and really focusing on my own balance and ride of the canter I tried it again and within 5 minutes it was like riding a different horse.

Good luck!
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    12-02-2013, 02:58 PM
  #6
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ninamebo    
OP this exact same thing was happening with my boy, and with one quick glance from a wonderful horsewoman she said I was riding too much the down stride and not enough the up stride- now this seems blaring my obvious as it's pretty basic, but somehow over time I must have been focusing less and less on myself and turning all of it to how my horse was going- silly of me. But with a little tweaking and really focusing on my own balance and ride of the canter I tried it again and within 5 minutes it was like riding a different horse.

Good luck!

This is intriguing. Could you explain what you mean by riding the down stride, as opposed to the up stride?
Walkamile likes this.
     
    12-02-2013, 03:46 PM
  #7
Green Broke
Agree Tinylily, and will be anxious for an explanation. I think I may be guilty of this, if it is what I'm envisioning.
     
    12-02-2013, 03:50 PM
  #8
Super Moderator
Yep. (raises hand guiltily) me too.
Walkamile likes this.
     
    12-02-2013, 04:25 PM
  #9
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ninamebo    
OP this exact same thing was happening with my boy, and with one quick glance from a wonderful horsewoman she said I was riding too much the down stride and not enough the up stride- now this seems blaring my obvious as it's pretty basic, but somehow over time I must have been focusing less and less on myself and turning all of it to how my horse was going- silly of me. But with a little tweaking and really focusing on my own balance and ride of the canter I tried it again and within 5 minutes it was like riding a different horse.

Good luck!
You mean riding through the transitions as opposed to kind of chasing the horse into it? If so, I'm guilty of that too, and it caused a lot of issues..

You need to ride every step of the way, to support your horse every step of their stride. If your horse is falling in, make sure that you have both seatbones equally placed in your saddle, that you aren't dropping your own shoulder or throwing away contact, or putting too much pressure on the inside stirrup.. that you are using your inside leg to outside rein connection. That you don't allow your horse to skip or cut corners.

It's a LOT of work at first, but once your body is right, your horse will have an easier time understanding what you want and also will be able to maintain better balance at the canter.

It's a process, though! You'll both get it in time!
     
    12-02-2013, 04:30 PM
  #10
Super Moderator
Not sure but a lot of people put too much weight behind the down stride in the thought that they're somehow pushing the horse forwards with their seat (which they are) but when you go on the up stride their nothing there to balance it out so the horse puts in a shorter stride and ends up being uneven
The stronger a rider (in your seat) you are the more noticeable it becomes
     

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