Going Down Centerline Like a Drunken Sailor
   

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > English Riding > Dressage

Going Down Centerline Like a Drunken Sailor

This is a discussion on Going Down Centerline Like a Drunken Sailor within the Dressage forums, part of the English Riding category
  • Horse blocks going down center line
  • Halting square?

Like Tree4Likes
  • 3 Post By Kayty
  • 1 Post By Valentina

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    03-15-2012, 08:09 PM
  #1
Yearling
Going Down Centerline Like a Drunken Sailor

I am having problems :).

I started the centerline training by putting poles on either side at intervals, sort of like road markings, to get the horse to understand what "straight" meant. He has no problems being straight and halting square with the poles, however, take away a single line or take the crutch altogether and he jigs and dances and goes side to side down the centerline.

I do concentrate on maintaining a "chute" with my seat centered and hands and legs in a full "square" and look straight ahead to make sure I get the straight line, however, the horse still wiggles.

Even into the halt at times he will step side to side a couple of times before he finally stops square like he is trying to fnd just the right spot. Out of six tries I may get one good centerline walk and halt.

Could be just exuberance and further exposure and work will help but I am wondering if anyone has some other suggestions?
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    03-15-2012, 08:27 PM
  #2
Super Moderator
It's been a long time since I had any training in dressage, but I wonder if you put him into the tiniest flexion to one side, instead of trying to keep him exactly even between your reins, would this help in keeping him going straight downt the centerline?
I really don't know, but it might work.
     
    03-15-2012, 08:37 PM
  #3
Trained
I know...I do reining, but I have the same issue with a straight line. Feels worse than it looks, usually. Anyway-where are you looking? Try focusing on ONE spot. Straight ahead. Head up-eyes focused. I find this helps.
     
    03-15-2012, 08:41 PM
  #4
Trained
Forward, forward forward forward forward forward.... you get the idea.
If you don't ride forward, the horse will NOT be straight.
When you ride down the centre line, don't halt. Just ride straight down. Once you start thinking about your halt, you will subconsciously start taking off your driving aids and think about stopping. The horse loses impulsion, wonders what you're doing up there, and starts going crooked.
There is little need to actually practice your halt at X. I only ever practice my trot-halt-trots, if the horse is trotting nicely forward, with my aids and into the bridle. If the horse is with my seat, then I know I can ask for a halt and probably get a good one.
     
    03-15-2012, 09:46 PM
  #5
Weanling
I have a wiggle butt too... if I'm not riding right it's like there's a whole other horse back there doing it's own thing.

Like Kayty said... forward. I concentrated too much on halting at X and ended up with a horse that swung out in behind because my aids were thinking side to side not riding back to front.

I do work a lot of straight lines, but different lines. I will ride the quarter track, diagonal, center line, and then lines at random. I work in a hunt ring so I pick a pole and head that way. I work on a trot that is forward and attentive. I've found if I ride like I'm not stopping, we have a better halt. I can stop squarish (won't say square all the time but his tush doesn't point a different direction anymore) almost anywhere I want.

Primo got so used to halting at x that he'd balk going up to it and wiggle and wander about well... yep like a drunk. Now that we trot about randomly halting he is so much more forward, balanced and straight. It's the only part of the test I don't practice.
     
    03-15-2012, 09:50 PM
  #6
Trained
Gypsy is also very wiggly down center line. We do very well if I remember not to over correct her. If he moves one way, don't jump all over him about it, take a deep breathe and give him a light aid.
     
    03-15-2012, 10:02 PM
  #7
Weanling
At my friend's new horses' first dressage show (schooling) he went down center line so drunkenly that the judge made a comment on the paper; "feeling a little tipsy?". I almost died laughing when she showed me, the horses nickname after that was Tipsy. :P
But anyway to help you out and get back on topic; her instructor made her do tons of serpentines and figure eights and work on them and then started switching between doing them and going up center line since serpentine's and figure eights are still straight lines just not center line. She said people usually over concentrate on straightness doing center and try to over correct because they can see how far off they might travel. It helped her out a lot and also helped clean up her corners. :) Hope that helps!
     
    03-15-2012, 10:36 PM
  #8
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayty    
Forward, forward forward forward forward forward.... you get the idea.
If you don't ride forward, the horse will NOT be straight.
When you ride down the centre line, don't halt. Just ride straight down. Once you start thinking about your halt, you will subconsciously start taking off your driving aids and think about stopping. The horse loses impulsion, wonders what you're doing up there, and starts going crooked.
There is little need to actually practice your halt at X. I only ever practice my trot-halt-trots, if the horse is trotting nicely forward, with my aids and into the bridle. If the horse is with my seat, then I know I can ask for a halt and probably get a good one.
Forward is the key. Don't think of halting as what it is, stopping. Think of it as stepping the horse up into the halt. Not only will you be striaght, your horse will also be square!

Just practice riding staright line all over the place. Center line, quarter lines, short sides of the arena, diagonals. Pick and spot and ride to it. Straightness is what we all are aiming for and it is not an easy goal.
     
    03-16-2012, 07:34 PM
  #9
Yearling
OK...I had af ew successes tonight. :) First, I was FINALLY able to get Paddy to stand at the mounting block in the outdoor arena and it only took 20 minutes. When I did the same training in the indoor arena it took over an hour but granted, since he had already done it inside he gave in a lot sooner.

Second, I took several of these advices (is that a word? :)) and did some serpentines both side to side of the dressage arena as well as top to bottom (A to C). I concentrated on the straightness in the serpentines and also worked the diagonal free walk focusing actually on a house that is perfectly located for each diagonal I have to ride :)..I only glance down a little when I get a stride or two before the letter where I have to change the bend or gait.

I rode each test once tonight and I got two straight and square halts with less resistance than I had last night. He is still trying to jig a little on the turn down the centerline for Intro A, the walk turn, as he has gotten used to the initial trotting in for the intial entry.

He did fantastic tonight. I had put up all the flowers we normally put in the letter baskets in order to get him over the initial spooks I was expecting.....just as any horse will do to make you look like a moron, he didn't twitch an ear at them. This from a horse that nearly left me on the side of the arena a week or so ago when just the edge of flower stuck under a gate (for a jump) on the outside of the arena was blowing a little in the wind.

The only thing I have to worry about is his reaction to the tent the judge will be sitting under. Unfortunately that won't be up until the day of the show and I ride early :). Maybe he will surprise me again?
     
    03-19-2012, 03:49 PM
  #10
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayty    
Forward, forward forward forward forward forward.... you get the idea.
If you don't ride forward, the horse will NOT be straight.
When you ride down the centre line, don't halt. Just ride straight down. Once you start thinking about your halt, you will subconsciously start taking off your driving aids and think about stopping. The horse loses impulsion, wonders what you're doing up there, and starts going crooked.
There is little need to actually practice your halt at X. I only ever practice my trot-halt-trots, if the horse is trotting nicely forward, with my aids and into the bridle. If the horse is with my seat, then I know I can ask for a halt and probably get a good one.
This. One suggestion that helped a student of mine was trot down centerline in medium/lengthened trot (hard for judge to tell from straight-on angle and driving horse forward prevents wiggling). It works!

When you halt do so by stopping seat and arms, keep legs on. When you start practicing halts (down centerline) have someone "spot" you from B/E. They can tell you if horse is not square and if you focus on halt and keep your legs an both sides of horses barrel you can FEEL if horse tries to throw hind legs (step out) in one direction or the other. When this happens just "hold" with the leg that touches the barrel - do NOT push or he'll swing in opposite direction. Also pay attention to YOUR weight - is it even on BOTH sides of the saddle or are you sitting off to one side or the other? If the rider is not sitting squarely on the saddle (i.e. You are leaning in one direction) then the horse will mimic your lack of squareness. So rider not square = horse not square!
DressageDreamer likes this.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What do you do with a drunken sailor? MySerenity Trail Riding 30 11-23-2011 12:50 PM
my black mare Sailor Moon Manni01 Horse Pictures 4 06-18-2011 11:28 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:12 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0