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Haunches in

This is a discussion on Haunches in within the Dressage forums, part of the English Riding category

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        01-06-2012, 03:58 PM
      #11
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by farmpony84    
    Ok. Yes. My last trainer had me do that (attempt to) and I had been practicing at home and was really proud of myself because I was doing so well.....And then he told me I was doing it backwards. I had the haunches to the rail and the shoulder in. I still can't figure out what I'm doing wrong, obviously my commands are backwards.

    It is not backwards actually.

    The counter to the travers or haunches in, is the renvers or haunches out.

         
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        01-06-2012, 04:31 PM
      #12
    Super Moderator
    This is where I have a really hard time because I have to think about what body parts need to do what to get what I need. It doesn't come naturally to me.
         
        01-06-2012, 04:40 PM
      #13
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by farmpony84    
    This is where I have a really hard time because I have to think about what body parts need to do what to get what I need. It doesn't come naturally to me.

    Believe me I know of some good dressage riders that can get things discombobulated...so don't feel bad.

    The main reason I put up this thread is so people can understand what these movements are and what their true purpose is for.

    There seems to be so much misinformation out there and misuse of exercises to make short cuts for other things without realizing that problems exist when you use a hammer to bang in a screw.

    Good tools in their own right but not the correct ones.
    DuffyDuck and With Grace like this.
         
        01-06-2012, 06:49 PM
      #14
    Super Moderator
    I was with my original trainer for several years and I never questioned why I was doing what... I would ask what it did but never got a true answer. I switched to another trainer near the end of the summer and he was able to tell me what to do and why I was doing it and he also was able to figure out that I was asking for it wrong or right. I really like him but he has some health issues so I'm going to try another trainer. I really hope she can give me what I need to move forward.

    I find threads like these very helpful because of exactly that. It's explaing a purpose behind an exersize.
         
        01-06-2012, 08:15 PM
      #15
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by farmpony84    
    I was with my original trainer for several years and I never questioned why I was doing what... I would ask what it did but never got a true answer. I switched to another trainer near the end of the summer and he was able to tell me what to do and why I was doing it and he also was able to figure out that I was asking for it wrong or right. I really like him but he has some health issues so I'm going to try another trainer. I really hope she can give me what I need to move forward.

    I find threads like these very helpful because of exactly that. It's explaing a purpose behind an exersize.

    Glad to help.

    If you or anyone else has a specific topic they would like to cover then don't be afraid to start a thread here or even PM me about an area of concern.
         
        01-07-2012, 02:57 PM
      #16
    Weanling
    I also had a trainer for many years before being left on my own, at which time, I started the "Why?" routine. . .

    I think my question is: What's an Incorrect haunches-in? Because I suspect the reason we used to avoid them, was it was easy for the horse to go "incorrect" without us knowing.
         
        01-07-2012, 03:31 PM
      #17
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Beling    
    I think my question is: What's an Incorrect haunches-in? Because I suspect the reason we used to avoid them, was it was easy for the horse to go "incorrect" without us knowing.
    An incorrect haunches in is when you can truly call the horse crooked. The hind legs will not be doing their job equally.

    One hind will be off and not engage under as far as it should and instead carries its hips at an angle. It is not supporting the shoulder on the same side and can cause that shoulder to bear into that rein because the weight has shifted to the front leg also on that side.

    This is the "Help! My horse is falling in" posts/threads we see so often.

    And what happens to the right is that it no longer swings straight forward but out and away from the profile of the horse...in essence...does nothing to help the horse at all.


    The end result is that the outside hip is leading the inside hip and not in a carrying or thrusting position at all.

    This is the danger of using this position to get the canter. Most people attempting this to get the canter are using the incorrect position, calling it a haunches in ( which it is not) when in fact it is simply a crooked horse.

    They may get the canter simply because the load is so great on the inside shoulder that the horse canters to relieve itself of the weight on the forehand.

    Beling likes this.
         
        01-08-2012, 09:31 AM
      #18
    Yearling
    Spyder!
    This is a great thread.
    Am I wrong with this thought?
    The haunches in and halfpass are the very begining tools for later prep for other movements such as Pirouette? I thought I heard this from someone recently in my home area, but I may be wrong and mis heard things totally.

    On another note....I sometimes struggle with Haunches in and halfpas. 1) because it is new to me and my horse is slightly better at it than I and 2.) because I had some injuries to my own body over the years I have issues with my left side.
    I have difficulty as someone else mentioned getting my body to do what I want it too do. It is as if I have a "body-mind execution Brain twister" If that makes any sense at all.
    I seem to be able to practice these movements best by doing them only a few steps at a time.
    Sometimes when I try to carry the movement down the long side of the dressage court I end up unable to hold it correctly for that length of time.

    Just like my horses muscles need to be strengthened to do this I also need to develope my own muscle coordination and strength.

    I seem to struggle the most with holding the bend without over doing things and loosing the haunch

    But! The good news is....it gets better! When I first started these movements with my trainer I was totally twisted in my brain-body . It was frustrating. I wouldnt even try to attempt to practice them on my own until I felt I could recongnise the movement being done correctly by feel. As my horse is learning too, I felt it was best to only attempt them with my trainers trained eyes watching and guiding me through the correction of my body and my horses body.
    Now after a while I am able to play with these movements on my own and practice them.
    Very exciting.
    Love this thread.....
         
        01-08-2012, 10:27 AM
      #19
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by HalfPass    
    Spyder!
    This is a great thread.
    Am I wrong with this thought?
    The haunches in and halfpass are the very begining tools for later prep for other movements such as Pirouette? I thought I heard this from someone recently in my home area, but I may be wrong and mis heard things totally.
    It certainly can be used as a pirouette preparation. I personally rather use the shoulder fore...shoulder in, but there is no set rule that says you must use this for that and that for this before you can do something else. Different trainers prefer different roads to Rome. As long as good equestrian principles are adhered to then it does not matter.

    Quote:
    I seem to be able to practice these movements best by doing them only a few steps at a time.
    Sometimes when I try to carry the movement down the long side of the dressage court I end up unable to hold it correctly for that length of time.
    None of these exercises should be over done and we should ALWAYS straighten the horse by a good vigorous forward trot after doing them. The haunches in is the one movement that can easily turn a straight horse into a crooked one with overuse and incorrect positioning.

    Quote:
    But! The good news is....it gets better! When I first started these movements with my trainer I was totally twisted in my brain-body . It was frustrating. I wouldn't even try to attempt to practice them on my own until I felt I could recognize the movement being done correctly by feel. As my horse is learning too, I felt it was best to only attempt them with my trainers trained eyes watching and guiding me through the correction of my body and my horses body.
    Now after a while I am able to play with these movements on my own and practice them.
    Very exciting.
    Love this thread.....
    Sometimes after you recognize the movement enough to be able to position the horse correctly I try to get people to do it out in the open anywhere in the arena. When you can in the middle of the arena without the wall to position yourself, be able to perform all the lateral movements correctly one after the other then you can truly say you have mastered control over all of your horse.

    But all of these exercises start with just a step here and a step there and the rider feeling what the horse is doing under themselves.
    HalfPass likes this.
         
        01-08-2012, 10:39 AM
      #20
    Yearling
    Thanks Spyder.
    My trainer does have me straighten and go forward..after doing the movement and getting those few good steps. She has me do this with many movements afterwards.
    I am glad you stated about doing the movement in the open. I will sometimes ride the bridle path at the ranch and pick a very short line and practice. A few steps only. Then as you stated straighten.
    This has been a very helpful thread for me. I enjoy reading your responses to different peoples issues.
    Being able to practice and practice movements and finally feel you are getting a good "feel" of your horses body is such a wonderful reward!
    One thing that is totally attached to "feeling my horse" Is NOT looking down at the horse. I will get a much much truer (if that is even a word) sense/feeling of my horses boody in conjunction with my body if my chest is open and my eyes and head are up. If I am looking down and thinking to much about my horses body I am distorting my "feel" of what is really happening.

    Anyway....I will continue to follow this and many of your other threads..
         

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