Help Getting on the bit?
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > English Riding > Dressage

Help Getting on the bit?

This is a discussion on Help Getting on the bit? within the Dressage forums, part of the English Riding category

    View Poll Results: What discipline do you do?
    Eventing 4 16.00%
    Dressage 17 68.00%
    Show jumping 1 4.00%
    Western 3 12.00%
    Voters: 25. You may not vote on this poll

    Like Tree25Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        06-29-2014, 02:59 AM
      #1
    Foal
    Help Getting on the bit?

    I'm having trouble getting my 3 year old station breed (some suspected Clevedon Bay) on the bit. She knows how to do it, the people we got her from taught her and rode her like that all the time, but I've had her for about 6 months without doing any bit work and my trainer has said I should start doing some bit work with her. I've never ridden a horse that knows how to go on the bit, well I have, just never gotten them on the bit.

    I feel like I'm sending mixed signals to her. I'm really confused on how to do it, my trainer has tried to teach me. I'm just confused.

    Any help would be great thanks.
    Attached Images
    File Type: jpg image.jpg (56.5 KB, 140 views)
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        06-29-2014, 03:43 AM
      #2
    Foal
    How are you with contact?

    Lots of leg. A horse can tuck it's head and look pretty but not really be on the bit.

    Get her engine going and think "forward". :)

    Not very descriptive, I know, but I'm still learning too, these little pieces of advice have really helped me. Also use the back of your calf to cue, watch your heels! I used to ride with my heels, then had some lessons and realised that it's a very bad habit of mine. With time and practice, you two will achieve "on the bit" in no time!

    Since she knows how to do it, it's probably you that needs the training. ;) elbows bent, leg on, and reeelaaaxxx. My horse won't do squat for me if I'm tense.
         
        06-29-2014, 04:01 AM
      #3
    Super Moderator
    What are you actually doing to get her on the bit and what is her response?

    It isn't that a horse knows how to come on the bit or not due to being trained previously. It's more whether or not the rider has the skill and training to encourage the horse to do this. It's the rider who must know what it feels like , and how to hold and give the reins with feel and timing, that makes a big difference, more than if the horse has ever been trained in this way before . I mean your mare can be trained up the wazoo but if the rider can't handle teh reins well, can't get the horse forward and can't ride at least not interfering with the horse, then the horses training level will not matter.

    I am not saying you are having all these troubles. But those are the basic requirements and to always keep in mind it's the riders lacks that matter most.

    Tell as what riding is like with this horse .
    Yogiwick likes this.
         
        06-29-2014, 08:02 AM
      #4
    Foal
    I have some issues with this, also, mainly at the trot but I think it kinda helps to visualize. Squeeze her with your calves like you'd squeeze toothpaste out of a tube, and then capture that energy you're getting from her hind end, by squeezing, with your hands. Make sure your contact is firm, but not harsh (: As a last resort you can also very gently squeeze with the inside rein to encourage horses to soften- no tugging, just open and close your hand. But if you can do it without that, then by all means, that's better. Just my two cents- not claiming I'm correct in my assumptions (:
    ALSO: while softening/being on the bit is important, try not to worry too much about 'headset' or where her head is at, because then you're likely to lose track of direction, etc. and confuse her more.
         
        06-29-2014, 11:02 AM
      #5
    Started
    A three year old horse is not physically mature enough to sustain a proper outline for any length of time. I would be suspicious of the previous owner's claims and probably dismiss them as far as working with this horse.

    So, I would work with this horse as though she has never developed her muscles correctly and work on all the basic training of impulsion and aids. Coming on to the bit correctly will come in time.

    If your instructor can not explain the basics to you of impulsion from the back end, and holding in at the front end then - try a different instructor. We can help to explain here but the risk of working with someone who just teaches you to achieve a false headset sounds quite high.

    By the way, what is a 'station breed'? Is that a mistype, or a term I don't know? A pure Cleveland bay is I think a rare breed on both sides of the Atlantic.
    tinyliny, Beling, Clava and 5 others like this.
         
        06-29-2014, 04:24 PM
      #6
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Shropshirerosie    
    A three year old horse is not physically mature enough to sustain a proper outline for any length of time. I would be suspicious of the previous owner's claims and probably dismiss them as far as working with this horse.

    So, I would work with this horse as though she has never developed her muscles correctly and work on all the basic training of impulsion and aids. Coming on to the bit correctly will come in time.

    If your instructor can not explain the basics to you of impulsion from the back end, and holding in at the front end then - try a different instructor. We can help to explain here but the risk of working with someone who just teaches you to achieve a false headset sounds quite high.

    By the way, what is a 'station breed'? Is that a mistype, or a term I don't know? A pure Cleveland bay is I think a rare breed on both sides of the Atlantic.
    My instructor has explained all this stuff to me, I'm just not quite getting it yet. Also we went to look at Koala about 3 times before we got her. The owners we got her from work at a professional horse barn training thing, I'm not sure what you call it. And every time she rode here, she was on the bit perfectly. She is not a pure Cleveland Bay, a station bred is a horse that, as the name suggests bred in a station, so she is a mix of breeds. Although since she is SO solid and stocky (my instructor loves solid/stocky horses she was a polo player) we suspected Cleveland Bay.

    A three year old can hold an outline. And I think she might be four now(not that her birthday was today, just we've had her for 6 months and we got her at the age of three. My neighbour/trainer retired from polo with a shoulder injury and went on to training Kiamanowas. (I can't spell that word for the life of me) she had some that were 2-4 years old on the bit and held them there, that would go on whenever she asked than too.

    You can also tell Koalas been on the bit before by where she places her feet. When a horse in on the bit their back legs go where there front legs were, replacing them pretty much. Koala walks and trots like that naturally.

    When we walk down hills she has a lot of impulsive form her rear end, just never on the flat.
         
        06-29-2014, 10:38 PM
      #7
    Started
    Hello again Braidedtails

    The thing with the feet that you describe is called 'tracking up'. Some horses track up naturally, even when they are walking around with their heads in the air and/or hollowing their backs. Many horses don't quite track up (ie their hind feet land just behind where their front foot was) in normal walk, but one of the results of asking for more impulsion, and holding that front end in, engaging the hind end, is that they will 'track up properly' ie. Do what you describe.

    My point about your trainer was this:

    I have had lessons all my riding life, because I love learning. I have had many different instructors, and many/all of them tried to teach me to bring a horse on the bit and achieve that correct engagement and outline.

    Many many many of them failed in this task - some were poor communicators, some did not understand how to do it themselves and just went for the false headset thing.

    If your trainer is not helping you, there is NOTHING wrong with using another. We don't have to have exclusive relationships with our instructors! You can learn a lot by reading in the dressage part of this forum, but almost nothing beats the eyes on the ground watching you.

    By the way I love myself a stocky solid horse

    Oh - and I'm not being narky about the station thing. I genuinely don't understand what you mean. In my world a station is where railway lines pass through or terminate at. I am now guessing that you are in NZ or Oz and I am still guessing that a station is a kind of ranch?
    tinyliny and Clava like this.
         
        06-30-2014, 02:04 AM
      #8
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Shropshirerosie    
    Hello again Braidedtails

    The thing with the feet that you describe is called 'tracking up'. Some horses track up naturally, even when they are walking around with their heads in the air and/or hollowing their backs. Many horses don't quite track up (ie their hind feet land just behind where their front foot was) in normal walk, but one of the results of asking for more impulsion, and holding that front end in, engaging the hind end, is that they will 'track up properly' ie. Do what you describe.

    My point about your trainer was this:

    I have had lessons all my riding life, because I love learning. I have had many different instructors, and many/all of them tried to teach me to bring a horse on the bit and achieve that correct engagement and outline.

    Many many many of them failed in this task - some were poor communicators, some did not understand how to do it themselves and just went for the false headset thing.

    If your trainer is not helping you, there is NOTHING wrong with using another. We don't have to have exclusive relationships with our instructors! You can learn a lot by reading in the dressage part of this forum, but almost nothing beats the eyes on the ground watching you.

    By the way I love myself a stocky solid horse

    Oh - and I'm not being narky about the station thing. I genuinely don't understand what you mean. In my world a station is where railway lines pass through or terminate at. I am now guessing that you are in NZ or Oz and I am still guessing that a station is a kind of ranch?
    I'm not trying to prove anything but I really do have a relationship with my instructor. I've been with her for 4 years. This might not sound like much but when she's your neighbour and she gives you free lessons in exchange for work,you develop a strong bond.

    She is definitely helping me, everyone else seems to understand it except me.

    But by station bred in exactly like you think on a huge farming ranch thing. So her dam and sire would be farming horses. I suspect she was born somewhere really cold because right now (it's winter) she is REALLY REALLY fluffy. It also means she's a mix of different breeds so she could be part Arabian for all I know! You can get a DNA test to find out, but I have no clue who her dam or sire is so I'm not sure If I can Register her. By the way I live in NZ.
         
        06-30-2014, 02:17 AM
      #9
    Foal
    I was about to ask if you're in New Zealand, since I am too, and understood the term haha
         
        06-30-2014, 02:26 AM
      #10
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Shropshirerosie    
    Hello again Braidedtails

    The thing with the feet that you describe is called 'tracking up'. Some horses track up naturally, even when they are walking around with their heads in the air and/or hollowing their backs. Many horses don't quite track up (ie their hind feet land just behind where their front foot was) in normal walk, but one of the results of asking for more impulsion, and holding that front end in, engaging the hind end, is that they will 'track up properly' ie. Do what you describe.

    My point about your trainer was this:

    I have had lessons all my riding life, because I love learning. I have had many different instructors, and many/all of them tried to teach me to bring a horse on the bit and achieve that correct engagement and outline.

    Many many many of them failed in this task - some were poor communicators, some did not understand how to do it themselves and just went for the false headset thing.

    If your trainer is not helping you, there is NOTHING wrong with using another. We don't have to have exclusive relationships with our instructors! You can learn a lot by reading in the dressage part of this forum, but almost nothing beats the eyes on the ground watching you.

    By the way I love myself a stocky solid horse

    Oh - and I'm not being narky about the station thing. I genuinely don't understand what you mean. In my world a station is where railway lines pass through or terminate at. I am now guessing that you are in NZ or Oz and I am still guessing that a station is a kind of ranch?
    well said, Rosie
    Shropshirerosie likes this.
         

    Tags
    3 year old, bit, dressage

    Quick Reply
    Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
    Message:
    Options

    Register Now

    In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

    Already have a Horse Forum account?
    Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

    New to the Horse Forum?
    Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

    User Name:
    Password
    Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
    Password:
    Confirm Password:
    Email Address
    Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
    Email Address:

    Log-in

    Human Verification

    In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


    Old Thread Warning
    This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    my horse goes behind the bit then grabs the bit in his teeth and runs thru it ellen hays Horse Training 24 03-24-2014 02:41 PM
    Horse who doesn't like taking the bit, maybe a bit change? LovesMyDunnBoy Horse Tack and Equipment 10 09-13-2012 07:25 PM
    Bit Buddy handmade bit warmers ON SALE! RebeccaMI Tack and Equipment Classifieds 29 03-10-2012 02:36 PM
    Jr Cowboy Bit?? Stop & Turn Bit? Chele11 Horse Tack and Equipment 9 12-16-2010 03:33 PM
    Bit Search...if anyone is bored wanna try and find this bit? SonnyWimps Horse Tack and Equipment 4 08-11-2008 08:35 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:43 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0