How to shop for spurs ?
   

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How to shop for spurs ?

This is a discussion on How to shop for spurs ? within the Dressage forums, part of the English Riding category

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    • 1 Post By DuffyDuck
    • 1 Post By picup436
    • 1 Post By equitate
    • 1 Post By Corporal
    • 1 Post By OliviaMyee

     
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        06-12-2014, 02:19 AM
      #1
    Weanling
    How to shop for spurs ?

    Ive been borrowing my friends spurs, and need to buy my own. Except I don't know what spurs to get.

    Im working on long and low with my horse at walk and trot and at the walk yielding the hindquarters and leg yielding. I've been using the spurs not to get my horse faster but I use them in a caressing manner which flicks upwards to encourage my horse to lift his back at long and low.

    My horse is big and im getting him more reactive so I wont be wanting the rounded tiped spurs as I need spurs with a decent ammount of length for the action I use the spurs in.
         
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        06-12-2014, 02:42 AM
      #2
    Green Broke
    Is your horse used to spurs?

    If not, I'd suggest something softer

    SPRENGER Sporen Balkenhol Ultra-Fit - abgerundeter 20mm Dorn, extra Grip - Sporen - Krämer Pferdesport

    These have worked for 90% of horses I know.

    And you can get them in different lengths

    SPRENGER Sporen Balkenhol Ultra-Fit - abgerundeter 30mm Dorn, extra Grip - Sporen - Krämer Pferdesport

    Some like these, but for a horse that isn't used to spurs I prefer a ball tip
    SPRENGER Sporen Balkenhol Ultra Fit - rechtwinkliger 25 mm Dorn, extra Grip - Sporen - Krämer Pferdesport

    And for my old school master I used these: SPRENGER Sporen Balkenhol Ultra Fit - 25 mm Ballrad - Sporen - Krämer Pferdesport

    Simply because when I got him, he was dead to my leg. The disc is aimed to roll on the horse, not be put in the side. I had more of a reaction from these than any of the above.

    I suppose one could also say that if your leg is steady enough, it doesn't matter what type you ride in as you'll be able to control how much use you have over it. My old old trainer was western based and got on horses with the big rowled things.
    OliviaMyee likes this.
         
        06-12-2014, 02:50 AM
      #3
    Weanling
    Thank you I will have to check out the different types of spurs when I get back from my ride today, the horse is used to spurs that are just the average type ones not rounded. I don't know what type of spurs im using now but their not sharp and not completely blunt I could describe them as a medium type of spur.
         
        06-12-2014, 04:00 AM
      #4
    Trained
    I would certainly get a spur with a roller on the tip - preferably a ball for starting out but a round disk is also appropriate. I use disks on my horses and have always had favourable results.
    I can't stand standard 'dummy spurs' which I assume is what you are using? They have a small surface area so tend to jab the horse rather than roll over the skin.
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        06-12-2014, 04:09 AM
      #5
    Foal
    I bought these for my mare. I love them, she hates them. Even the slightest touch and she tries to kick them off my feet. I thought it was me. But it's not, she does the same thing to my coach when she rode her in them. They are great for my gelding though.

    I have these for my mare: Soft Touch Spurs (Impuls)

    They offer that little bit extra refinement without being too much. Unfortunately they aren't as pretty as the other ones Function over form I guess.
    OliviaMyee likes this.
         
        06-16-2014, 10:36 AM
      #6
    Weanling
    Spurs are meant for clarity, a specific touch in lateral work.

    There are many comments about the use of spurs which are perhaps problematic. There is a part of the (french) system where in an already squared HALT the leg/spur is used (near the girth) to lift the belly by lifting the heel/spur upward. It is to function like belly lifts on the ground with the fingers; it squares the halt more, and in that manner lifts the chest/back. By doing that (and if the horse's jaw is mobile) then the horse may encouraged to 'chew the reins from the hand' forward/down/out.

    The spur could certainly be used in lateral work, as long as it is timed to the gait.

    But lifting the spur in motion to ask the horse to chew fdo, is problematic. But remember the spur CONTRACTS the belly way too easily.

    Remember fdo is a test of proper acceptance of the bit, and allows for a mobile jaw. It is not really something one 'works on' or allows for more than a circle or two.

    There are many long(er) spurs (1-2") which are rounded/curved/etc.
    OliviaMyee likes this.
         
        06-20-2014, 10:22 AM
      #7
    Trained
    We used spurs with rowels for CW Reenacting (for 26 years). Although mostly for show, to complete the uniform, they were useful to move a horse out from a sticky situation. I never schooled with them at home. We also, for the people afraid of such spurs, Never drew blood with them bc you control your leg when you ride with them.
    At home I preferred to school with Prince of Wales spurs. I don't know what is regulation but I DO know how to train for a "show", which was what we were doing in simulated battles. Your horse must first know that you mean business when you ask with your LEG. It's always, while training, leg first, spur if you didn't listen to my leg.
    Although Dressage originated from European warfare, you are not in a dangerous situation while performing a test. =/
    Therefore, your do not need the sharpest or longest spur to ride your test. I believe that you should train and be able to perform the test BEYOND the one that you are showing. Then you can use a minimal spur while in the current test. I believe that your obedient horse performing without HAVING to apply a more severe spur really shows everyone your training and your horse. I would be sad if this was not the case. Just my personal view of horse training so take this with some salt (bc it's summer) and you're getting advice for the price it's worth, free. =D
    Enjoy showing!!
    OliviaMyee likes this.
         
        06-23-2014, 11:23 PM
      #8
    Weanling
    Realised I've been using a dummy spur and its going well, so im going to keep using them. I wish Red wasnt ridden by beginers before I bought him, his a very big horse and if he doesnt want to do something like leg yield, he wont do it sometimes unless he sees the whip or spur. His gotten much better though, but im getting him more sensetive to the leg and the spur is a very helpfull poking tool.
    Corporal likes this.
         
        06-24-2014, 11:37 AM
      #9
    Trained
    You might try isolating the exercises where he is dull and deliberately asking just for one movement at the end of a schooling session. When he performs it with lightness, immediately dismount and praise and end the session. Then he can associate a pleasant experience with performing well.
         

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