How to sit a ''big'' trot?
 
 

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How to sit a ''big'' trot?

This is a discussion on How to sit a ''big'' trot? within the Dressage forums, part of the English Riding category
  • Sitting trot quads
  • How to ride a huge trot

 
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    01-25-2011, 04:16 PM
  #1
Zab
Yearling
How to sit a ''big'' trot?

Hellu. :)

It was a while since I visited this page, I doubtanyone remember me. Anyhow.

I have a multigaited standardbred, and I ride him in walk, flatwalk, saddlerack/rack, trot and canter. Could probably get a flying pace too but why bother.

This question is all about the trot. I've finally gotten adecent trot out of him, he'll trot on a light cue, be smooth as butter in my hand and easily go very slow with a lot of ''resting'' in the step and gradually go faster to the race-track trot if I let him. I always told myself that once we managed the slow, reasonable trot, I'd be able to sit him, or at least post properly.. but now that's a laugh. His trot is still huge, and I'm flying around like a glove in a tornado. Which is very unrewarding for him when he finally trots for me. And it's quite bothersome for me too..

I'll see my trainer this weekend and might get some help there, but do any of you have any advice to help me stay on his back? I've tried riding without the stirrups but I kept loosing balance and made him nervous and rushy..
My probem is as far as I can see, that I keep falling forward.

I don't have any trouble riding other horses at a trot, or sitting their trot, but Crow's trot is just impossible for me.. :3

Thank you for your input.

(sorry for the quality)

     
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    01-25-2011, 04:32 PM
  #2
Green Broke
He is very cute!! I have a Standardbred mare, is he a STB too?.
My mare has a big trot too, the best advice I can give is to just practice a lot and get his rythem.

I also heard that if your saddle is too big for you, you have to much room and become unstable. That is just what I heard.

Good Luck! :)
     
    01-25-2011, 04:39 PM
  #3
Zab
Yearling
Thanks :)

Yes, he's a standardbred by blood (swedish trotter by name).
     
    01-25-2011, 06:15 PM
  #4
Trained
The reason you are leaning forward is to compensate for your ab/core muscles.

This is next to impossible to thouroughly explain to someone, it really is a feel. Basically you need to be sitting vertical, core engaged, keeping your thighs from gripping, quads engaged to position the leg properly and then using your back to make a motion with your hips to absorb the shock. This is why having a saddle with the correct twist is imparative to a correct sitting trot and why I hate those narrow twist saddles that hit you in the pubic bone every time you try to sit into the horse. You really need to sit "into" the horse and not "on top" of him. This requires a lot of strength in your core to follow a big trot.

Good luck!
     
    01-25-2011, 06:22 PM
  #5
Zab
Yearling
Thanks, I'll try to translate that to practice next time I ride :)
     
    01-25-2011, 06:54 PM
  #6
Trained
I've been gradually working my way into sitting trot. I find that switching between posting and sitting frequently helps my core muscles recover a little each time which creates more quality sitting steps versus flopping around when I've long since run out of steam.
     
    01-25-2011, 07:07 PM
  #7
Weanling
Practice makes perfect! :) It may help also to try to absorbe all the choke from your horses trot with your heels stay very supple :P good luck love your horse btw !
     
    01-25-2011, 07:13 PM
  #8
Weanling
Hard to explain, as said before...but something that helped me visualize it is that your hips are going to take turns being up or down, the up one you just let happen, but the down one you PUSH down into the motion. I don't mean let your butt up out of the saddle, I mean letting one hip shift up as the other shifts down, this keeps your butt in contact on the saddle....I hope I'm explaining it correctly. As mentioned above, it's a lot of core work.
     
    01-25-2011, 07:24 PM
  #9
Weanling
Yep! Abs of steel! Need them to hold yourself up and control the tempo. My trainer also has a visual: think of your spine as a rubber band that absorbs the shock. Need to be careful not to overdo it and collapse through the back though. Best to have someone watching you from the ground to tell you if you are doing it correctly and not developing a bad habit. This helps me a lot!
     
    01-30-2011, 03:45 PM
  #10
Zab
Yearling
Thanks for the advice :)
I'm working on it and it and managed to both sit and post, at least a few times.. xD Sometimes it just won't work no matter how hard I try, then suddenly there are a few moments when I ''find it''.

On a side note; I have some back-issues that might make it a bit more difficult. I have scar tissue in a few vertebraes, some ''black discs'' and an overall damage of the muscles that stabilize the back. I'm on a training program to help those muscles re-build, change my moving pattern (some years of pain has lead to a few undesireable ''solutions'' from my body to avoid pain) and altogether work these physical problems. I believe I'll be alright again :)

In any case, I have a video if anyone's interested.
PLEASE READ before commenting on tempo, tact and tension etc; When I saw this video I noted several things I'm changing in my way to ride, in order to help him work better :) I'm not asking him to go as slow as he will offer (and does in the video some times), since he puts some gait tendensies into it and pulls his nose in to much while bouncing around. So I'll ask him to be a little more forward rather than ''up''. I ride on loose reins, it's the way we're training and any shorter reins will just make him curl up and avoid the contact, but letting him more forward makes him lower his neck and put the nose out more, so it's not a big issue :) My imbalance is since it bugs him no matter how much I try to keep my hands steady.. as you know I'm working on it. :)
My instructor has been sick and couldn't give me any lesson, but she watched the video and gave me some advice on how to make the ''bounce'' in his steps a little less.. bouncy. He's overdoing it and we need a regular trot first.
Since this is new work for him and me, we're both a bit tense at times.
Please remember that two weeks ago he could not trot in any other way than fast and sloppy and getting the trot wasn't as easy either. So be nice. X)
Now when you've read, feel free to give more advice and feedback if you get to think of anything :) Just don't be too harsh, we're trying to learn; we're not supposed to be all perfect yet ;)
Thank you.

     

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