Intro B: Change Rein Across Diagonal at Trot
 
 

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Intro B: Change Rein Across Diagonal at Trot

This is a discussion on Intro B: Change Rein Across Diagonal at Trot within the Dressage forums, part of the English Riding category
  • Change of rein correct
  • Change rein a cross the diagnal means

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  • 1 Post By maura
  • 1 Post By ~*~anebel~*~

 
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    03-13-2012, 05:35 AM
  #1
Yearling
Intro B: Change Rein Across Diagonal at Trot

Question :)

I have my first dressage show with a new horse and under the new tests on Sunday but a question has come up that I am not sure about.

During the Intro B there is a change of rein across the diagonal (K-X-M) at the working trot. The test is written up in that it calls for a "clear definintion in the trot" but I am not sure if they want to see just the same working trot that is done throughout the test, which would mean no change in length across the diagonal, or some small manner of lengthening. I know when I rode the tests back in the late 80s (intercollegiate) the judge wanted to see some definitive lengthening in that type of diagonal.

My boy has no problems with this particular part of the test; he likes those long changes as he also likes to lengthen; just expects it as this a part of training repetition. One exercise I use is to lengthen down the long sides (or diagonals as the case may be) and collect at the ends.
     
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    03-13-2012, 06:54 AM
  #2
Banned
At Intro the expectation would be that you maintain the same trot through the change of rein. If there was supposed to be a lengthening or shortening of stride the test would explicitly call for it.
Kayty likes this.
     
    03-13-2012, 08:48 AM
  #3
Yearling
That is what I would think as well but my experience way back when indicated that while the test doesn't indicate a change of stride, the judge likes to see a more "crisp" stride across the diagonal even when the same stride is used throughout the test.

Granted, as in anything having to do with sports, I think some judges prefer to see certain things. I scribed for a few in the past couple of years just to get an idea of what they are concentrating their focus on and each one had different visual preferences (outside of the test write-up) when it came to this or that movement. Not sure how to explain it but what was in the write-up of the test, sure, they followed it, but they would also comment on little extras that would make the visual aspect better.
     
    03-13-2012, 01:33 PM
  #4
Banned
Tlkng,


Not sure what type of intercollegiate showing you were doing, was it dressage showing, or a flat test, program ride or dressage sportif as part of another competition?

I beleive (Kayty or anabel, help me out here) that under USDF rules, you would actually be penalized for showing a change in stride, tempo and rhythm across the diagnol, that one of the things they're looking for is that the trot remains consistent.

And I am absolutely sure that if it is not explicitly described in the movement or the scoring criteria, you shouldn't.
     
    03-13-2012, 01:40 PM
  #5
Trained
A working trot is a working trot is a working trot. Rising or sitting, in a corner, on a longside, on a circle, in a leg yeild and yes, even on the diagonal. There is one working trot for all of these things and yes maura is correct, it must stay the same throughout the whole test for maximum marks.
The reason you may be feeling that the judge likes to see more trot on the diagonal is because the judge probably wants to see more trot everywhere in the test, not just on the diagonal. A good working trot has quite a bit of thrust from the hindlegs.

Good luck!
Kayty likes this.
     
    03-13-2012, 08:35 PM
  #6
Trained
In simpleton terms - ride exactly as the test dictates. Dressage tests don't allow for improvisations - that's what a freestyles is for ;)
If it says show some lengthened strides on the diagonal, then show some lengthened strides. Otherwise, stay in working trot. They don't ask for lengthened strides at that level for a reason - usually the horse is not established enough to hold lengthened strides. Plus its a good test of your control as a rider - lots will teach the horse to lengthen or rush across the diagonal or long side - so being able to maintain the same tempo and rhythm throughout is harder than you'd think.
How many horses do you see or ride, that will only stay together on a circle or square? - as soon as you point them in a straight line, either down the long side or across the diagonal they go hell for leather and the poor person on top is desperately trying to keep the horse back with gritted teeth. This is why we don't train a horse to lengthen or run on as soon as it goes in a straight line!
     
    03-14-2012, 10:13 AM
  #7
Yearling
I had a lesson yesterday with a judge on training. Guilty... ) I do use the longer distances to work the larger trot and my boy was anticipating. We did much better under her eagle eye and was able to contain the excitement. He did very well yesterday and I have high hopes for his debut on Sunday. Still, I am using this show as a baseline so if I end up laughing all the way through the test , at least we will enjoy ourselves. Appreciate the input. :)
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    03-14-2012, 10:30 AM
  #8
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by tlkng1    
I had a lesson yesterday with a judge on training. Guilty... ) I do use the longer distances to work the larger trot and my boy was anticipating. We did much better under her eagle eye and was able to contain the excitement. He did very well yesterday and I have high hopes for his debut on Sunday. Still, I am using this show as a baseline so if I end up laughing all the way through the test , at least we will enjoy ourselves. Appreciate the input. :)
Posted via Mobile Device
I missed the edit timeframe..let me try again :)..that should be judge IN training.

As for the intercollegiate, this was in the '85 timeframe. We did a single day modified three day event working whichever dressage tests were official at the time, a shortened cross country course and modified stadium (mixture of hunter and jumper style fences and turns) jumping. This was actually my first introduction to what I refer to as proper dressage outside of basic exercises for hunters.
     
    03-14-2012, 01:19 PM
  #9
Banned
I suspect strongly the dressage test was what the ANRC calls "Dressage Sportif"; judged differently than an actual dressage test.
     
    03-15-2012, 06:00 AM
  #10
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by maura    
I suspect strongly the dressage test was what the ANRC calls "Dressage Sportif"; judged differently than an actual dressage test.
No, the test sheets were the same sheets used for regular dressage shows at the time. It was a regular test, judged the same way but again, we are talking 1983-1985 timeframe.
     

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