Leg Yield to Half Pass
   

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Leg Yield to Half Pass

This is a discussion on Leg Yield to Half Pass within the Dressage forums, part of the English Riding category
  • Leg passes in horses
  • Ryans working pupil

 
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    02-02-2011, 10:37 PM
  #1
Foal
Leg Yield to Half Pass

So I have FINALLY established a good leg yield on my mare! She can leg yield both directions, walk, trot and canter and in various angles (e.g, K to M, B to H and E to B), and now I want to turn it into a half-pass. What exercises should I do to start bending her in the other direction, and what is the best way to introduce half pass? It might also help to know that to leg yield, I do need to squeee, squeeze, squeeze with my outside leg to get her to continue the yield.

Thanks!

Also, I want to do a working pupil position with Heath Ryan, but have a few queries.
Does anybody know:-
Does he teach/train you in eventing/showjumping/dressage, or just dressage as he is a dressage rider?
What can I expect (work and training-wise) as a working pupil
     
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    02-02-2011, 11:09 PM
  #2
slc
Weanling
Do you have someone helping you now, an instructor? It is better if someone helps you in person.

Both to check that the leg yield is correct and that the haunches in, shoulder in,that are pre-requisites for the half pass, are correct.

You don't go from leg yield to half pass, it isn't a matter of just changing the bend and getting a half pass. Someone needs to help you and show you what order to teach things in, so that the horse will be able to understand what is wanted, as well as have the muscles already being developed, to be able to do it.

I don't know what Heath Ryan does, why don't you send him an email?

As to what to expect as a working student, lots and lots of very hard work. It is very, very important to be in very good health and already be very, very used to doing a lot of work all day, farm work, barn work, riding, and walking - lifting, carrying, lots of hard work.

The experience of a lifetime if with an accomplished, successful trainer, but an awful lot of long hard work.
     
    02-02-2011, 11:14 PM
  #3
Foal
On leg yields - I don't have an instructor as there is only one near where I live and I haven't ever heard of her so I'm not sure if she is good or not - Shere Lamont? Also, haunches in and shoulder in are both on their way to being fully established, she is just learning to do them without a fence on one side.

On working pupil - I have sent him an email but haven't heard back as yet. And I'm assuming as a pupil, I will get trained with my horse? I don't want to go for it if I'm going to be stuck cleaning boxes all day. I don't mind cleaning boxes but my last horsey job that was all I did, nothing else, not even sweeping the aisle, and I got seriously over it. I would just like to know if it is more cleaning/grooming/non-riding work as opposed to what I am kind of expecting, riding as well as general work
     
    02-02-2011, 11:18 PM
  #4
Trained
If you need to squeeze to do a leg yield, you have some work to do. All that should be required to do a leg yield is proper leg placement. Pressure should not be necessary.

As far as half pass, all it really is is haunches-in on a diagonal. A qualified dressage instructor would be very helpful. Half pass requires a properly balanced horse and it's not always easy to determine without eyes on the ground.
     
    02-03-2011, 12:27 AM
  #5
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by MadamKing    
It might also help to know that to leg yield, I do need to squeee, squeeze, squeeze with my outside leg to get her to continue the yield.
Hmmmm

Leg yield would be the INSIDE leg asking the horse to move over.

No where would you be doing any sort of squeezing on the OUTSIDE leg to move the horse over IF you are doing a leg yield correctly.
     
    02-03-2011, 12:33 AM
  #6
Foal
I mean, when the horse is moving across to, for example, B, my left leg is behind the girth squeezing
     
    02-03-2011, 02:22 AM
  #7
Yearling
As for the Heath Ryan thing, theres plenty of info on the Ryans website, last time I looked. And yes, you do bring your own horse if it is deemed suitable.

Eta:
http://www.ryanshorses.com.au/page/training.html
     
    02-03-2011, 04:21 AM
  #8
Foal
I've read that page already, thanks though
     
    02-03-2011, 07:27 AM
  #9
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by MadamKing    
I mean, when the horse is moving across to, for example, B, my left leg is behind the girth squeezing

Still incorrect.

A LEG YIELD should NOT have your leg behind the girth. The INSIDE leg is at the girth and the horse yields AWAY from it.

Here is a decent one (although the haunches trail a bit)



Here is a half pass and in this case the OUTSIDE leg would be slightly behind the girth.

     
    02-03-2011, 08:05 AM
  #10
slc
Weanling
Not all horse people answer emails quickly, and they often go places and don't check their emails. Too, if it's not an emergency, it might get pushed to the back of the list.

I don't know what you mean when you say your OUTSIDE leg is used more to get your leg yield.

Your INSIDE leg is on the inside of a bend.

Your OUTSIDE leg is on the outside of a bend.

It does not matter what direction you are going. It does not matter where the rail or wall is. It matters which way you are bending.

Some instructors, when teaching say 'outside' leg, meaning the leg closest to the rail or wall of the arena, so as not to confuse people. That isn't correct terminology, but people get so mixed up when they are riding, that some instructors try to simplify terms for them.

To make matters worse, you never know, when talking to people, and especially on the internet, if they are using the correct terminology or not. It's important to ask for clarification, so that you know what they mean.

Even in leg yield, with just the little bit of bend at the head/neck, there is still an 'outside' and an 'inside' leg.

The 'INSIDE' leg is the leg the horse yields away from.

Don't try doing half pass until your shoulder in and haunches in are a LOT more confirmed. Best advice in the world - get instructor help.

I don't know the instructor you named. With some exceptions, an instructor with USDF certification usually knows not to have students skip over stuff so they can do the stuff they think is 'cool' before they are ready.
     

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