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The mysterious half halt, causes and effects.

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        07-26-2011, 01:35 PM
      #81
    Weanling
    QR

    Horse is going a bit too "forward", so a quick squeeze on the reins to indicate you want to 'steady on a bit' (as opposed to stop completely), with a half halt I apply hand then leg, to tell the horse "slow down, but keep going". It works for me!
         
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        08-04-2011, 10:22 AM
      #82
    Green Broke
    Just read the whole thread...and now I'm grabbing my breeches and running out to the stable earlier than planned because I can't wait to try out what I have learned in this and the canter thread on Cinny. Ohhhh it's going to make him made, I suspect he will rear a few times as new things that frustrate him often make him do....but in the end, I think we will do a lot better in the show ring next year.

    THANK YOU SPYDER!!
         
        08-08-2011, 03:01 PM
      #83
    Weanling
    (in total wonder) Spyder WHO ARE YOU?? LOL

    Great thread I'm just beginning dressage and everyone is always talking about the half halt. It's all a little over my head and i've read it twice but I'm saving it to read again later. I kind of felt like I was Allllllmost getting it...

    I'm still looking for a good coach down here is MS. It's HARD to find people that are into dressage. Everyone I know rides western pleasure.
         
        08-08-2011, 04:59 PM
      #84
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by WildAcreFarms    
    (in total wonder) Spyder WHO ARE YOU?? LOL

    Just someone that wants people to have a knowledge of WHAT they do and understand WHY they are doing it.

    The odds are that from this understanding that even if you have limited access to a good trainer your brain may figure out what comes next and have a logical plan to achieve something that you FELT was beyond you.
    WildAcreFarms likes this.
         
        08-09-2011, 09:50 AM
      #85
    Green Broke
    Do you think maybe we can have turns on the fore and turns on the hind in a future thread???
         
        08-09-2011, 10:04 AM
      #86
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cinnys Whinny    
    Do you think maybe we can have turns on the fore and turns on the hind in a future thread???
    Sure.

    I am off to work and will start a thread when I get back.

    But I will back up a step or two with the shoulder fore and shoulder in which would be helpful to know before the full turns.
         
        08-09-2011, 05:55 PM
      #87
    Weanling
    Thanks so much Spyder for sharing with the people on the board.
    I've alwqays been one of those "BUT WHY does it work that way" kind of riders so your thread is really cool for me :)
    It really makes you think about whats actually going on.
         
        08-28-2011, 12:51 PM
      #88
    Weanling
    First of all, thank you so much for all your articles. They have given me in a few days what nothing and nobody else has for all the years I've been riding. You make the little pieces come together and I can't express how grateful I am for that. I have the most wonderful trainer I could have asked for but your ability and will to help and make things understood is like I haven't seen in anyone else. Err... back to the topic before I get lost even more...

    I've been reading this topic for 4 hours now over and over again (just another boring Sunday afternoon) and the more I try to understand the more confused I am... I guess I was just trying too hard and while things were really making sense in the beginning now I can't seem to be able to clear my head anymore. I have so many questions, but let's take this easy...

    You keep repeating "a half halt given on one side will influence the other side". I have very well memorised this by now, but I seem to have missed the most important part of it - how? Half halt given on the left side will shorten or lenghten the stride on the right side? I seem to be the only one to whom it's not yet obvious by now so it must have been made clear somewhere throughout the topic but if you could maybe repeat it for the slow minded like me..?

    As I lack this very basic knowledge I don't fully follow the next explanation:

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Spyder    
    For example.

    The horse is traveling in a straight line at a trot and you want to turn left. Then what you take into consideration is that the right side of the horse ( right legs--front and back) will have to take a longer side being on the outside of the arc. The left side needs to take a shorter stride and be a bit more supportive to prevent the horse from falling in. So not only must the rider take into consideration the timing of the half halt but the strength of it as well. The stronger the half halt the more you are asking the horse to support itself. You must also take into consideration the degree of the turn to be asked.

    So you must catch the diagonal pair ( left front--right back)that has just left the ground. If the horse is supple enough the half halt along with the riders inside leg sould suffice to accomplish the turn so the horse does not fall inward. The amount of release of rein that follows the half halt will determine the length of stride and if the start of turn goes correctly then only minimal half halts will be necessary to maintain that turn until it is completed.
    "If the horse is supple enough the half halt along with the riders inside leg sould suffice to accomplish the turn..." Can you please specify on WHICH side the half halt is applied? I was always told to half halt on the inside, which would mean that a half halt on the left side influences the opposite side by lenghtening the stride. Is that correct? Or am I utterly lost?

    That is all I will ask for now as maybe your answer will answer my other questions too. Thank you in advance.
         
        08-28-2011, 01:55 PM
      #89
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mumiinek    
    First of all, thank you so much for all your articles. They have given me in a few days what nothing and nobody else has for all the years I've been riding. You make the little pieces come together and I can't express how grateful I am for that. I have the most wonderful trainer I could have asked for but your ability and will to help and make things understood is like I haven't seen in anyone else. Err... back to the topic before I get lost even more...

    I've been reading this topic for 4 hours now over and over again (just another boring Sunday afternoon) and the more I try to understand the more confused I am... I guess I was just trying too hard and while things were really making sense in the beginning now I can't seem to be able to clear my head anymore. I have so many questions, but let's take this easy...
    The half halt consists of two things. The leg that drives the horse forward with the OPPOSITE rein that supports and adjusts the stride length and swing distance and timing.

    So you drive with the inside leg which in trot will affect the outside hind and inside front. This will occure just as the outside leg leaves the ground. This will simply tell to horse to move that leg forward and the strength of your drive will tell the horse the degree of thrust (and affect the length of stride). If the rider stopped there the horse would be going forward in a state of unconstraint and here is where you will find riders saying their horse is falling on the forehand or speeding up as the rider has not told the horse to do anything beyond "go forward".

    The second part of the half halt is in modifying just what that leg now in motion is supposed to do beyond just going forward. So the rein aid will occur on the OUTSIDE rein in support of the INSIDE rider's driving leg. That rein aid will in effect catch the leg while it is motion and tell it to slow down ( and start to create suspension) so the arc of the swing of that leg will be higher (but the rate will remain the same, just take up a difference space) and will be planted on the ground at a shorter distance.

    So now you have replaced thrust with support. At this point it is up to the rider to adjust the strength of drive (for the longer stride) against the support ( for the shorter stride that is not just mincing steps but actually carry suspension).

    All this is the start of collection needed later in advanced riding.




    Quote:
    You keep repeating "a half halt given on one side will influence the other side". I have very well memorised this by now, but I seem to have missed the most important part of it - how? Half halt given on the left side will shorten or lenghten the stride on the right side? I seem to be the only one to whom it's not yet obvious by now so it must have been made clear somewhere throughout the topic but if you could maybe repeat it for the slow minded like me..?
    First we must know you cannot influence a grounded leg.

    So look at your horse as it moves. If the OUTSIDE hind leg is under the horse and therefore ON THE GROUND you as the rider cannot do anything to it. The horse's belly will actually bulge on the opposite side. So when you feel that bulge and use your INSIDE leg to push the belly to the opposite side, the outside leg will have lifted off the ground and your inside driving leg has now told that outside hind to take another stride. The rein aid will be on the outside (opposite to the driving leg)to support the stretching of that side of the horse ( or restrict it) and actually defines just what sort of animation the trot will display.


    Quote:
    As I lack this very basic knowledge I don't fully follow the next explanation:



    "If the horse is supple enough the half halt along with the riders inside leg should suffice to accomplish the turn..." Can you please specify on WHICH side the half halt is applied? I was always told to half halt on the inside, which would mean that a half halt on the left side influences the opposite side by lenghtening the stride. Is that correct? Or am I utterly lost?

    That is all I will ask for now as maybe your answer will answer my other questions too. Thank you in advance.
    Again the OUTSIDE rein aid will support any stretching of that side and prevent a turn taken too sharp by the horse.

    The basic point is that the rider influences the striding and support by allowing one aid to influence the horse more than the other. Too strong a drive with very light rein aid will result in a longer stride but if the rein aid is NOT supportive enough the horse runs through the bridle. Too much rein and the horse shortens its steps and goes choppy.
         
        08-28-2011, 02:27 PM
      #90
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Spyder    
    The half halt consists of two things. The leg that drives the horse forward with the OPPOSITE rein that supports and adjusts the stride length and swing distance and timing.
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mumiinek    
    "If the horse is supple enough the half halt along with the riders inside leg sould suffice to accomplish the turn..." Can you please specify on WHICH side the half halt is applied?
    Does that then mean "half halt on the outside rein along with the inside leg"? I've always been taught "steady contact on the outside rein and half halt on the inside rein" (with inside leg on the girth)... So that's all wrong?
         

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