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Possible new prospect for next dressage horse

This is a discussion on Possible new prospect for next dressage horse within the Dressage forums, part of the English Riding category

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    04-29-2014, 01:22 PM
  #31
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydee    
The best way to judge a horses action is to have it trotted away from and towards you on a hard level surface

Sorry, *puts hand in air because wants to ask question*

Asks anyway...

While I agree that a lot of lameness evaluation is done trotting on a hard level surface, I thought that often equally as telling are the hard turns, done either way and the first step or two off the turn?
     
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    04-29-2014, 01:34 PM
  #32
Green Broke
One of the only signs of anything wrong with Reecos pelvis (stable but rather large fracture of the right ilium) was when he was cantered on a circle he was close and uneven behind in canter but completely sound at trot on all surfaces and in both a straight line and on a circle. A horse does not have to be head bobbing to be lame I fact only front leg lameness causes head bobbing, hind leg lameness is often only expressed through unlevelness and not the characteristic head bobbing
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    04-29-2014, 02:03 PM
  #33
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golden Horse    
Sorry, *puts hand in air because wants to ask question*

Asks anyway...

While I agree that a lot of lameness evaluation is done trotting on a hard level surface, I thought that often equally as telling are the hard turns, done either way and the first step or two off the turn?
The first thing most vets will do when they PPE for soundness re. The legs and feet is to have it trotted up and down as I described. Flexion tests (see video) are then done
and asking the horse to turn on itself and walk away or trot away then horse is then either ridden or lunged - but it can be quite hard to distinguish between a horse being lame on the lunge or just getting its legs in a knot/striking itself when its not educated enough to know how to do the job
I wouldn't personally buy this mare or recommend her for the OP but if she was otherwise perfect for me I wouldn't discount her based on that lunging without first having a vet or a farrier look at her - a horse that's out 24/7 and likely not getting much attention could easily have any sort of hoof related problems going on that are an easy fix
     
    04-29-2014, 02:49 PM
  #34
Green Broke
Yes in a 2 stage vetting you get a trot up and flex ion test. In a 5 stage the vet will want to see them lunged in all 3 paces in a school and then worked hard on the lunge to determine wind and heart responses but they will also reassss flex ions after hard work and will see it lunged on a hard surface and as I said if you take a horse in for a full lameness work up trotting in straight lines is a very tiny part of it. Reecos work up lasted 4hrs only 5 mins of which was in a straight line
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    04-29-2014, 03:03 PM
  #35
Trained
Sometimes it's really hard to see the head bob. When I first got horses I didn't know how to do so much, so I took a Community College course on "Horse Health Care." It was taught by a Central IL Vet who treats exclusively horses and I discovered that his clientele had many race horses and high end show horses, plus a number of pricey broodmares.
We took the class at his clinic and he demonstrated many health problems with the horses that were under his care. For instance, he had us smell the breath of a broodmare with chronic colic--smelled sour--and he showed us a Hackney Pony with lameness by walking him on his driveway, with big pieces of gravel. Horses with lamenesses will exaggerate it on a gravel drive, and this makes it easier to see and diagnose.
If your horse just has tender feet he'll walk on gravel like everything hurts, BUT if it's a lameness, it will be obvious.
Hope this helps.
I'm so glad that they made this impossible for you. Keep looking! We'll keep helping you. **hugs**
     
    05-06-2014, 06:02 PM
  #36
Weanling
Neither of the videos show the canter - and that's a LARGE mistake. Buy the canter (as the trot can be improved) - look for a canter that is "uphill".

I would not purchase her for dressage - I don't see how she's any better than your current horse - and you want an improvement - don't you?

Keep looking
     
    05-08-2014, 10:09 PM
  #37
Foal
If you really want her, just be sure to get a vet check. The "lameness" could be from needing her hooves done, being very out of shape, or from the footing. Or a combination of the three.

Also, her legs do not look very straight...
     
    05-11-2014, 03:56 PM
  #38
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Valentina    
Neither of the videos show the canter - and that's a LARGE mistake. Buy the canter (as the trot can be improved) - look for a canter that is "uphill".



Keep looking
Valentina beat me to it. I was also surprised to see no canter. You can improve a trot up to 80%, but with walk & canter, you have what you have. Those are the gaits that need to be great if you want to do well in dressage. Glad you passed on her. I can't seem lameness with coke bottle glasses, and I saw her head bob from a mile away. Buying horses is like buying houses. Take the heart out of it and make is purely a business purchase. You can fall in love with it later!
     



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