Is she getting off the forehand? *Pics - Page 3
 
 

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Is she getting off the forehand? *Pics

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  • Equitation on the forehand

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    07-12-2013, 06:53 PM
  #21
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by TerciopeladoCaballo    
Thanks.

I do Equitation over fences and Stadium jumping--- sorry to any hunters out there, but I hate hunt seat ;)


For clarification, you would ride your Hunter in a "Hunt Seat", but showing Hunters is not "Hunt Seat". "Hunt Seat" is a style of riding. "Hunt Seat" is also called "Forward Seat". With a Forward or Hunt Seat at a horse show, you can show in Equitation, Show Jumpers and/or Hunters.
     
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    07-12-2013, 10:14 PM
  #22
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by updownrider    
For clarification, you would ride your Hunter in a "Hunt Seat", but showing Hunters is not "Hunt Seat". "Hunt Seat" is a style of riding. "Hunt Seat" is also called "Forward Seat". With a Forward or Hunt Seat at a horse show, you can show in Equitation, Show Jumpers and/or Hunters.

I always thought it would be called something else for Equitation-ers? I tried learning to jump from a few different Hunter trainers. They all encouraged a chase-the-jump style, maybe that's just all the trainers and the local Hunter association in my area, I can't say for certain. So I mean I strive to sit upright and "tall", I don't ride a two-point between fences or around the ring. The technicalities of the stuff always befuddles me!
     
    07-12-2013, 10:30 PM
  #23
Trained
What people are seeing and referring to as hunt seat is that your upper body is leaning forward in every picture. You almost seem perched on there, rather than sat.

Next time you get on, take your feet out of the stirrups. Stick your feet out from your horse's side, as far as you possibly can. When you bring your legs back to a more normal position, you will feel a huge difference in how much contact you have with the saddle. That is how you want to have your seat for dressage - not heavy, but full. Right now, you look like you are riding in what I was always taught was a "two point" contact seat - your seat bones are the only contact with the saddle. Dressage requires a "three point" contact seat - your pubic bone needs to get in on that action.
     
    07-12-2013, 11:33 PM
  #24
Foal
Ahem, "technically", in dressage, there are three different seat positions. The "neutral seat", where your weight is balanced straight down on your two seat bones and your lower back is pretty straight/flat/vertical, the "forward" seat (used briefly when stopping), where you allow your lower back to arch inward very slightly and thus your weight, although still mostly on the two seat bones of course, also tips slightly forward onto the pubic bone as well. Then there is the third position, often called the "pushing" position, which is the opposite of the "forward" position. Your lower back rounds slightly and you sort of "tuck your tail under" thus distributing your weight on mostly on the two seat bones, but also somewhat on your tail bone area. That position is used to urge the horse to collect or move forward.

The "neutral" position is the one that is used in dressage most of the time. The other two are only used briefly "as needed" to get a specific response from the horse. This, by the way, is exactly as it is in WESTERN riding.

Oh, and none of the above has anything to do with the position of the rider's leg (except by default). A dressage rider's legs should be very long, similar to a western rider's leg, although some western riders use a "chair seat" which is not correct for dressage. A dressage seat, when viewed from the side, should appear closer to a "standing" position than a "sitting" position. If you stand on the ground naturally, with your feet spread apart a bit, then bend your knees slightly, you have the correct dressage position (side view). When you are on the horse in this position, your legs are to hang long and "drape" naturally down the sides of the horse without gripping (very similar to Western).

This is partly way I say that dressage is more like western than it is like hunt/English seat.


There are apparently different meanings to the term "two point". In my jumping days I was always taught that "two point" meant only contact with your legs. NO contact with your seat at all. So you are standing in the stirrups and resting your TWO KNEES against the horse, with your body in a forward position.
     
    07-12-2013, 11:39 PM
  #25
Trained
I am not at all suggesting that the seat is static. However, looking at the OP, she clearly needs more contact over all. By taking her legs off the horse, (not anything to do with leg position) it forces her seat to be her only point of contact, which means it will become deeper and fuller in that instant. Something she clearly needs.

As for the difference in terms, I made it very explicit what I meant by my terms. Yes, there are different definitions out there. Language is a beautiful thing.
     
    07-13-2013, 12:08 AM
  #26
Foal
Totally agree with you.
     
    07-13-2013, 10:05 AM
  #27
Foal
Yeah--- I strive to be upright now xP I agree, in the pictures of earlier this month and before, I go forward.
I took lessons from a Hunter for about three months, since I needed eyes on the ground at the least to get ready for a show. Not my best idea. She'd say "stop riding on your crotch" and to lean forward. I'm trying to get out of that.... When I'm not paying too much attention, or trying to sit lightly, that happens. She didn't like me sitting straight up and down.
Frankly I have a little fear of contact--- I hate making my horse uncomfortable and think I might hold too tightly O_o
The bending and grid exercises I'm supposed to do with my mare should force me to fix my position. I'd crumple a bit when I bent her in canter, good gravy that's a lot of work to keep shoulders up, calf on, reins just-so and actively giving cues... So you know what we're doing: bending circles in canter. Somebody's going to be sore, and I don't think it will be her...
     
    07-13-2013, 10:46 AM
  #28
Foal
Following hand, following hand, following hand..... (a good mantra to teach soft hands).
     
    07-13-2013, 06:00 PM
  #29
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by TerciopeladoCaballo    
I took lessons from a Hunter for about three months, since I needed eyes on the ground at the least to get ready for a show. Not my best idea. She'd say "stop riding on your crotch" and to lean forward.
If that is of all a hunter seat trainer could say, then you had a bad trainer.
     

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