Should I switch to a more advanced horse? - Page 2
 
 

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Should I switch to a more advanced horse?

This is a discussion on Should I switch to a more advanced horse? within the Dressage forums, part of the English Riding category

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        05-22-2012, 04:55 PM
      #11
    Foal
    Well friends, I emailed my instructor and she replied that I need to continue with the present horse because there are no horses who magically become on the bit while riding. She said my horse is schooled enough (surprise here) and I need to practice more. She emphasized the importance of what I'm learning and how necessary it is for the development of future skills.
    I have to admit I was taken back by her firmness. But it pleased me too. I know already that success requires persistent effort. I respect her opinion a lot and so I will continue with what I'm doing.
    Thanks all for your advice.
    DD
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        05-22-2012, 05:41 PM
      #12
    Banned
    At some point you have to decide to either trust the judgement of your current instructor or find another instructor. And certainly no harm can come to you from staying with the safe and staid school horse type, but I'm a little sceptical about your instructor's motivation. She may want to keep a capable, reliable twice a week lesson student whether she has the right horse for you to teach you on or not.

    Here's my reasoning behind this - an appropriate horse for you to ride at this stage of your riding is a horse that can be put on the bit when you're 80% correct in your aids; not a horse that's difficult to put together or unfamiliar with the concept. You want a horse that will reward YOU for asking correctly by going correctly; that's the best way to learn. A horse that's evasive or crammed into a false frame will be miserable to learn on; an uneducated one, nearly impossible. If your instructor can get on this school horse, and ride him on the aids after a brief warm up and keep him moving actively and correctly, then the horse is probably appropriate choice for you. If she can also explain *how* she's doing it, and that how includes skills you're working on in your lessons, then it's a good choice.

    If the horse doesn't really know how to go on the aids, or isn't fit enough, or ridden correctly often enough to go on the aids and stay there consistently for a better rider, then your instructor is sacrificing your development as a rider for the sake of a steady, paying student.

    If that's the case, I wouldn't necessarily break the relationship with the instructor, but I would become a lot more assertive about finding a horse to lease that you can really progress on.

    And to be fair, the type of horse you're seeking is a scarce and highly desirable commodity.

    Good luck to you in your riding journey, and please post back on your progress!
    kitten_Val, smrobs, Kayty and 3 others like this.
         
        05-24-2012, 10:04 AM
      #13
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by maura    
    She may want to keep a capable, reliable twice a week lesson student whether she has the right horse for you to teach you on or not
    This was my thought as well. It sounds like you really respect your instructor, and by all means, you should. But you said yourself this is a barn for beginners and it sounds like you are ready to move up. Don't let your relationship with your instructor keep you from progressing. You'll regret it.

    Good luck with everything!
         
        05-24-2012, 08:08 PM
      #14
    Trained
    I know people who have been riding schoolmaster after schoolmaster for years and still couldn't put a horse on the bit if their life depended on it!! I've seen a lady who went out an bought a horse competing at international levels and shw couldn't put it on the bit with draw reins even.

    I agree with your instructor, any horse that is used to a bit can be put on one. It's not easy, not in the slightest, even on a trained horse. Keep working on pushing the horse to your hands, riding from back to front and from inside leg to outside rein. It comes in fleeting moments which eventually turn into seconds and minutes and then hours. You can learn to feel on any horse.

    Good luck!
    Skyseternalangel likes this.
         
        05-24-2012, 09:43 PM
      #15
    Foal
    Oh Anebel, you sound just like my instructor. You are right, it's been fleeting moments for weeks but today I felt like finally it's turning into seconds at a time. Thank you very much for your encouragement.
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        05-31-2012, 01:41 AM
      #16
    Weanling
    A little different situation for me because I own the horse and don't lease or take lessons on a lesson horse, but I started eventing about 9-ish or so months ago and neither my horse or myself knew how to do things like move forward, accept the bridle, etc. I had to learn how to teach my horse, and I honestly wouldn't have it any other way. I rode my trainer's (young and learning) horse a few times to better get the feel, but worked super hard to get it down with my horse. Not only is that great experience for me, but now I know HOW to do it and HOW to teach it to other horses... and I currently am!
         
        05-31-2012, 02:11 AM
      #17
    Trained
    And how do you know that what you are training, is right?
    I ask, because I've taught people that thought their horse was going great guns, when in fact they'd just taught it to drop it's head and stay somewhat between the aids without using it's body. Makes for a comfortable ride, but in no means correct.
         
        05-31-2012, 02:30 AM
      #18
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~    
    I know people who have been riding schoolmaster after schoolmaster for years and still couldn't put a horse on the bit if their life depended on it!! I've seen a lady who went out an bought a horse competing at international levels and shw couldn't put it on the bit with draw reins even.

    I agree with your instructor, any horse that is used to a bit can be put on one. It's not easy, not in the slightest, even on a trained horse. Keep working on pushing the horse to your hands, riding from back to front and from inside leg to outside rein. It comes in fleeting moments which eventually turn into seconds and minutes and then hours. You can learn to feel on any horse.

    Good luck!

    I had a lesson last week and I got Zulu on the bit and the miracle was that not only did he come to the bit, soft to the inside, but he held himslef in self carriage, just floating along around a perfect circle , for about three rotations. I was smiling from ear to ear.
    I realized that I had been trying to hard to force and keep him there, but when I lowered my inside hind the second he softened, Zulu gave back to me this wonderful full minute long of trotting in self carriage!
    I can "put' him on the bit, but having him willing to stay there, now that was an awesome feeling, and made me realize I have a lot to learn.
    DingDong likes this.
         
        05-31-2012, 02:56 AM
      #19
    Trained
    Good on you Tiny!!! It really is a lovely feeling when they will travel in self carriage and a light, elastic contact. Every half halt comes through and is effective, you can feel the hind leg come under and the croup lower.
    By the way, you've got an inside hind? That's impressive :P
         
        05-31-2012, 02:56 AM
      #20
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kayty    
    And how do you know that what you are training, is right?
    I ask, because I've taught people that thought their horse was going great guns, when in fact they'd just taught it to drop it's head and stay somewhat between the aids without using it's body. Makes for a comfortable ride, but in no means correct.
    Is this question directed towards me? If so, are you refering to how do I know the training I am doing with my horse is right, or are you refering to the training I am doing with another horse?
         

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