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Sitting the trot..some pointers needed...

This is a discussion on Sitting the trot..some pointers needed... within the Dressage forums, part of the English Riding category
  • How to sit the trot forum
  • Sitting trot "back pockets"

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    11-09-2011, 10:03 PM
  #21
Super Moderator
Sitting with your tailbone on the seat is going to get your back hurt. If you take out the natural curve of your lower back by rolling your pelvis so bar back (lifting the pubic bone) too much, you will have a really flat back and will be putting pressure on your coxyx. Not a good idea. YOu will also always be behind the wave, riding on the back of it. I wish I had a good video to show the difference, and by the way , this doesn't mean that I can sit the trot so well. I am pretty awful at it if the horse has any kind of big motion.
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    11-09-2011, 10:19 PM
  #22
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
sitting with your tailbone on the seat is going to get your back hurt. If you take out the natural curve of your lower back by rolling your pelvis so bar back (lifting the pubic bone) too much, you will have a really flat back and will be putting pressure on your coxyx. Not a good idea. YOu will also always be behind the wave, riding on the back of it. I wish I had a good video to show the difference, and by the way , this doesn't mean that I can sit the trot so well. I am pretty awful at it if the horse has any kind of big motion.

I'm already so protective of my lower back (6 months in therapy last year!) I certainly can't afford to have another injury. I am learning this on a TB, with a pretty darn bouncy and fast trot. I've been watching lots of videos trying to figure out exactly what I should look like. I'll report back tomorrow evening when I get back from the barn...hopefully I can figure this out!
     
    11-09-2011, 10:39 PM
  #23
Trained
Tiny is very right in her response. Leaning back behind the motion is a great way to hurt your back and lose any ability to effectively use your seat and core.
There is a reason why we get drilled to sit on our seat and pubic bones, making a triangle on the saddle. This is the most effective riding position to be able to absorb the motion of a horse's movement, the movement is absorbed through the pelvis and the lower back is about to contract and flex with the movement. The core controls the degree of movement in the pelvis and lower back.

The absolute best thing you can do to help not only your sitting trot, but your riding as a whole, is to work really hard on getting a super strong core.
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    11-10-2011, 02:41 AM
  #24
Trained
I don't think leaning back, or rolling all the way onto the back pockets is what folks are suggesting. Just sitting here on a chair, if I feel my pelvis and keep my back straight, my lower back is pretty rigid. If I unlock my lower back, my pelvis rotates about to the lower edge of my rear pockets. That is about the position at which the western instructor I took lessons from this summer stopped saying "Get on your pockets!"

One of my biggest problems in riding is my tendency to lean FORWARD. Not slouch forward, but roll forward on my hips and lock my lower back. I then am rigid as a post, and will bounce and flail all over the place. Rocking here on my chair, I'd guess about 10 deg forward is enough to lock everything.

My natural sitting position, back vertical, still locks my lower back. If I don't move my shoulders back, but relax my lower back, my shoulders shift down maybe 1/2" - hard to tell without a mirror. It isn't a slouch, because my back doesn't go round. And it doesn't shift my rear much, although it feels more like I'm on my pockets.

I think that is what most western riders refer to as 'on the pockets'. It isn't leaning back, and it isn't looking like a sack of potatoes dumped on the saddle. I wish I knew how to describe it better. For me, "Unlock your lower back!" might be more accurate than "Roll onto your pockets!" - but the effect is the same as what got my instructor to stop shouting at me this summer.
     
    11-10-2011, 10:08 AM
  #25
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by With Grace    
thank you! This is similar to what my trainer is telling me as well - to sit with my tailbone on the seat instead of my seat bones and almost round the very bottom of my back and then relax..

I'm going to work on this tomorrow, I'm determined to get my sitting trot in order before moving on to anything else...
Oh no don't sit on your tailbone!!!! Seat bones, they keep your seat :P If you sit on your tailbone, you'll likely hurt yourself very badly! I once shattered my tailbone on a rock and it's still tender but I never feel it while riding because I stay on my seat bones.. and when you sit up tall you will feel more secure and balanced. It's keeping them there is what the problem is.

But I hope you get the sitting trot down.. it's very difficult at first

EDIT: Here's kind of a long winded explanation: http://www.classicaldressage.co.uk/html/the_seat.html
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    11-10-2011, 10:48 AM
  #26
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
Oh no don't sit on your tailbone!!!! Seat bones, they keep your seat :P If you sit on your tailbone, you'll likely hurt yourself very badly! I once shattered my tailbone on a rock and it's still tender but I never feel it while riding because I stay on my seat bones.. and when you sit up tall you will feel more secure and balanced. It's keeping them there is what the problem is.

But I hope you get the sitting trot down.. it's very difficult at first

EDIT: Here's kind of a long winded explanation: The Seat

Thank you! I don't think he meant actually ride on my tailbone, as sitting here right now takes way too much effort to even get my tailbone to the chair and I can only imagine the pain I'd be in if I sat the trot like that LOL! I think it was a way for me to visualize a rounded, relaxed lower back.

Whats funny is I used to be able to sit the trot quite lovely back in my late teen years...now later in life that is the one thing since I've started back riding that didnt come right back to me - and I have a feeling its because my core is not as strong as it was when I was 18.
     
    11-10-2011, 10:57 AM
  #27
Foal
The best thing ever for my sitting trot was taking the stirrups off my saddle. It did wonders! My trainer also had me pull myself down into the saddle by holding the pommel at first just to get the feel. Once I figured it out the stirrups came back and I wasn't flopping all over the place anymore!
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    11-10-2011, 11:48 AM
  #28
Showing
I'm too worried about slamming on my horse's back or him getting squirrely if I take the stirrups away YET.. I'm having a lesson this tuesday and then every tuesday from then on hopefully.. but that's one of the goals I have is to take the stirrups away to improve my sitting trot. That and ride him bareback :)

But I did do that on other horses and it really helps you FEEL the connection and establish where you need to be on upward and downward transitions as well as during ;)

I'm curious though, have you had a no-stirrups lesson on the lunge line yet?
     
    11-11-2011, 12:08 PM
  #29
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by olympustraining    
This is exactly right! I think what the person is referring to in english riding is many riders who ride in poor position. There are a lot of trainers out there teaching students to lean forward and fall onto their crotch. Of course, I would like to see these trainers showing records... but they are out there are more predominant in some parts of the country than others. This is not the correct way to ride english, english riders aim to evenly and balanced on their horses which is why a good english rider can sit such a huge extended trot!
Yes Thank you! That is exactly what I meant :)
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    11-11-2011, 12:14 PM
  #30
Yearling
So I worked on it last night and no improvement - she has such a large bouncy trot!
     

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