TB's in the Dressage Ring - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > English Riding > Dressage

TB's in the Dressage Ring

This is a discussion on TB's in the Dressage Ring within the Dressage forums, part of the English Riding category
  • Is a tb a good dressage horse
  • Dressage trainer disagree

Like Tree27Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    12-10-2012, 08:03 PM
  #11
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by OTTB8    
I am not discouraged...more shocked that this person even said that.
I was told by the trainer that both my horses are useless and never will be able to compete (even at the low levels). Yet, I shown Training level with my qh last year (this year I was off riding because of some health limitations, so didn't make it to the shows).

Best luck in a dressage arena with your TB, and don't forget to share pics as you go!
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    12-10-2012, 08:13 PM
  #12
Green Broke
Honestly I'm surprised someone would say that about a TB considering that after WB's that's what I see in the dressage rings most.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    12-10-2012, 09:24 PM
  #13
Weanling
My trainers horse is an OTTB and they do 2nd/3d level work! He was 400 off the track in comparison to her friends 20,000 warmblood who is struggling with simple lateral movements! They are a.w.e.s.o.m.e.

Im sure you and ur TB will rock the dressage!
     
    12-10-2012, 10:34 PM
  #14
Yearling
Just wait until I get into the ring with my TB paint. Lol.
Posted via Mobile Device
egrogan likes this.
     
    12-11-2012, 02:44 AM
  #15
Weanling
Most horses can do low level dressage - once you get up to psg/gp then the wbs have it, but because of their paces and the ability to collect and extend. Tbs aren't as flashy, and I've found too intelligent to make high level dressage horses - they get bored endlessly repeating the same movements. Hence why tbs or tb crosses dominate eventing. Plus, certainly here, most tbs haven't Ben been bred to race, let alone seen a track, so the racing injuries thing isn't as big a deal here - you don't see all that many ottbs!
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    12-11-2012, 05:26 AM
  #16
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by minstrel    
I've found too intelligent to make high level dressage horses - they get bored endlessly repeating the same movements.
I strongly disagree with that entire statement. Dressage is mentally challenging for the horse, ESPECIALLY the higher up you go. It should never be repetitive movement. A statement like the one above causes me to be skeptical about your understanding of dressage.

The Thoroughbred brain is PERFECT for dressage, even more so as you progress up the levels. I've found they love the mental challenge. Good dressage is something the TB mentality should excel at.

At the lowest levels, it takes a really smart rider to keep the TB brain engaged and focused, which is why TB's aren't (usually) very well suited for the adult ammy. You can get away with faking dressage on a warmblood if they're flashy enough, but with a TB... you have to ride with your mind, not just go through the motions.

This freestyle was pretty impressive:
Strange and Chiilaa like this.
     
    12-11-2012, 07:51 AM
  #17
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by minstrel    
Tbs aren't as flashy, and I've found too intelligent to make high level dressage horses - they get bored endlessly repeating the same movements.
I'm sorry, but this statement is as wrong as saying that dressage arena is not for TBs. To do high level dressage (jumping, eventing, whatever else discipline) successfully you need an intelligent horse that loves what its doing.
Chiilaa likes this.
     
    12-11-2012, 07:51 AM
  #18
Weanling
Now now, no need to accuse me of not knowing what I'm talking about because I disagree. I have in my experience found tbs in general (not all but most) to get flustered and frustrated easier than wbs. In dressage, where yes I would argue repetition is very important (not of whole tests, but if individual movements and transitions) in the search for perfection, I haven't found them to be great. I agree dressage is a mental challenge, but I find tbs don't cope with it. They get flustered and frustrated and can't hack the repetition. This is my opinion from my personal experience, so please don't insult me because my opinion differs from yours.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    12-11-2012, 08:27 AM
  #19
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by minstrel    
Now now, no need to accuse me of not knowing what I'm talking about because I disagree. I have in my experience found tbs in general (not all but most) to get flustered and frustrated easier than wbs. In dressage, where yes I would argue repetition is very important (not of whole tests, but if individual movements and transitions) in the search for perfection, I haven't found them to be great. I agree dressage is a mental challenge, but I find tbs don't cope with it. They get flustered and frustrated and can't hack the repetition. This is my opinion from my personal experience, so please don't insult me because my opinion differs from yours.
Posted via Mobile Device
I'm not insulting you, I'm saying that your concept of dressage is not correct.

Yes, TB's are more apt to get flustered/frustrated IF the dressage training is not correct. I have never, not once, seen a TB become anything but more relaxed, more attentive, and more supple under a good dressage rider. In fact, I'd say it's the best training for a hot horse with an intelligent mind (if ridden correctly).
Strange and Chiilaa like this.
     
    12-11-2012, 09:34 AM
  #20
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by core    
I'm not insulting you, I'm saying that your concept of dressage is not correct.

Yes, TB's are more apt to get flustered/frustrated IF the dressage training is not correct. I have never, not once, seen a TB become anything but more relaxed, more attentive, and more supple under a good dressage rider. In fact, I'd say it's the best training for a hot horse with an intelligent mind (if ridden correctly).
I would agree that low level dressage training is incredibly useful for working with hot, intelligent horses - buying do god that TBs crack once they get higher up - it becomes too much pressure. Again, my personal experience, but the number of TBs once you hit advanced medium drops completely, and it tends to be for mental rather than physical reasons. Hence why they event so well - they are good at lower level dressage and can combine their skillsets. However higher they tend to struggle mentally.
Posted via Mobile Device
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Put a dressage rider in the hunter ring, put a classical rider in the modern ring=? SPhorsemanship Dressage 136 09-06-2010 02:30 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:23 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0