TB's in the Dressage Ring - Page 3 - The Horse Forum

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post #21 of 53 Old 12-11-2012, 09:35 AM
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Sorry, on phone and predictive keeps messing up my words... Sorry if I'm a little unintelligible in places!
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post #22 of 53 Old 12-11-2012, 09:52 AM
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I would agree that low level dressage training is incredibly useful for working with hot, intelligent horses - buying do god that TBs crack once they get higher up - it becomes too much pressure. Again, my personal experience, but the number of TBs once you hit advanced medium drops completely, and it tends to be for mental rather than physical reasons. Hence why they event so well - they are good at lower level dressage and can combine their skillsets. However higher they tend to struggle mentally.
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Well, I still don't agree. I do agree that a lot of horse's, regardless of breed, can't hack the upper level work. It's not because TB are smarter, it's because it's hard. Doesn't matter if its a warmblood, Arab, TB, or QH. There's nothing breed specific mentally that prevents the TB breed from excelling at upper level work.

Also, the number of TB's drops off because it requires a higher level of collection then many of them are built for.
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post #23 of 53 Old 12-11-2012, 10:02 AM
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Could someone please explain what a "Warmblood" is? I was under the impression that there where 3 types of horses, the "hot" which would be Arabians, Tb. The "Cold-blooded" Which was the draft-type. Then the Warm-blooded" which was basically anything in between like Quarter Horse, American Saddlebred, Tennessee Walker, Hanoverian etc.

So when you say "Warm-blood" what breed of horse are you talking about? Because technically speaking Quarter horses etc. should be considered a "Warmblood".

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post #24 of 53 Old 12-11-2012, 10:30 AM
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Well, I still don't agree. I do agree that a lot of horse's, regardless of breed, can't hack the upper level work. It's not because TB are smarter, it's because it's hard. Doesn't matter if its a warmblood, Arab, TB, or QH. There's nothing breed specific mentally that prevents the TB breed from excelling at upper level work.

Also, the number of TB's drops off because it requires a higher level of collection then many of them are built for.
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Well have to agree to disagree about mentality then :) although I agree they aren't built for collection either...
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post #25 of 53 Old 12-11-2012, 10:40 AM
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A tangent I guess.

Whatwas the predominant breed of choice before the current trend of WB's built for collection?

Personally I find the problem lies with people expecting a <blank> to move like a WB. Blank is whatever breed :) shouldn't the movements be judged with the horse in mind and not against what another horse can do?
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post #26 of 53 Old 12-11-2012, 11:51 AM
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Emilyjoy, a "warmblood" is generally accepted to mean particular breeds of horses, many of which were specific to certain areas (many of which were in Europe). They were developed to fit a certain type wanted for specific jobs. Many were heavier types meant to be classy coach horses. They were heavier bodied and had nice movement. Others were a lighter and finer type more geared toward the carriage trade. Over the years, they developed distinct "types".

However, when coaches and carriages went out of style, with the entry of motorized cars, the warmblood was in danger of dying out of existence. What saved them was horse sport. These horses found a home in the competitive ring and the race was on to develop them for this purpose. As a result, there was a change in what they were looking for in "type". The lines between the different breeds started to become fuzzier as they started changing.

In today's world, it is quite difficult to tell one breed from another. But, at least they have a distinctive hot brand, usually found on the haunch, that gives you a clue.

Here are a few examples of these breeds. Again, the name of the breed usually tells where the particular "type" was developed.

Hannoverian

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanovarian_(horse)


Trakehner

Trakehner - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Oldenburg

Oldenburg horse - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Enough of the German provences, let's see some national warmbloods....

Swedish Warmblood

Swedish Warmblood - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Belgian Warmblood

Belgian Warmblood - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

See? This is just a minor sampling of the different warmblood breeds.
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post #27 of 53 Old 12-11-2012, 12:20 PM
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Sorry, on phone and predictive keeps messing up my words... Sorry if I'm a little unintelligible in places!
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On this side of the pond, we call it autocorrect. As in, "**** you, autocorrect!"
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post #28 of 53 Old 12-11-2012, 12:38 PM
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On this side of the pond, we call it autocorrect. As in, "**** you, autocorrect!"
Haha, has a better ring to it than "bloody predictive!" which is my usual curse of choice... plus it doesn't help I have large thumbs and try to type too fast, so my words ends up going crazy and I don't always notice... awkward when trying to have an intelligent discussion :S lol
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post #29 of 53 Old 12-11-2012, 12:45 PM
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Also, having re-read what I've actually typed I have an apology to make (I know, suck it up, Minstrel) - I've made it sound like I think dressage horses are stupid, or less intelligent or whatever. I honestly didn't mean that at all and I apologise, I meant that I've found TBs usually to be too smart for their own good, and that they are much more difficult to settle down to dressage in the higher levels because they do over think, get easily flustered and often can't take the mental pressure. This was my point, not that dressage horses should be stupid!!! I'm sorry, next time I will try to think through what I'm typing better!!!
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post #30 of 53 Old 12-11-2012, 03:02 PM
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Not to mention that quite a few of today's modern warmbloods out doing the upper levels can be hotter or as hot as your race horses. I don't think "TBs are more easily flustered" is the reason many don't get past medium. I think it is physical. Most aren't built for that collection. Some are. And some who have the ability may or may not be owned by riders of the same ability. See, lots of variables. In any case, some of the warmbloods are miles beyond what your average ammie rider can handle in terms of how sharp they are.
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