Tips for a good dressage score? - Page 6
   

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > English Riding > Dressage

Tips for a good dressage score?

This is a discussion on Tips for a good dressage score? within the Dressage forums, part of the English Riding category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        06-22-2009, 12:53 PM
      #51
    Green Broke
    Being able to see your distance is key, at least for me. I can see my distance(at a canter) about 7-5 strides out, which is key. I can count, 5 4 3 2 1, jump, and be able to hit the perfect position each and every time!
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        06-22-2009, 02:49 PM
      #52
    Trained
    Quote:
    PS (I think someone asked about this in one of the above posts) -- my trainer has not had a chance to work with me in x-c yet, only stadium and dressage. He felt badly about that, and because he had to miss the show yesterday (it was Father's Day so I can't blame him for that, he has kids!)...but he's taking me schooling tomorrow and he told me that he can help me with these issues and make sure it doesn't happen again! (well, minimize it at the very least haha!!)
    Completely understandable, and I am thrilled to hear that your coach will beable to work with you. It is always best to have educated eyes on the ground watching you, and talking to you as you ride and approach the fence.

    Let me know how it goes!
    Quote:

    Funny thing is that if she canters up to a jump, I'm with her 100% at the right moment, I can tell exactly when she's about to jump and follow her. But with trotting, it's SO HARD for me to figure it out for some reason...and I can't let her canter the whole thing because her canter is still VERY fast and gets more out of control as she goes. We're working with canter on the flat but for now, I'd like to keep the courses to a steady trot instead, for safety reasons (for both of us).
    I have the same issue my darling. I cannot feel Nelson's rhythm when I approach a fence at a trot. I hate it, hate it, hate it. I end up either ahead of behind - because I am so focused on "when is he going to take off"

    I would much prefer to approach a fence in a canter as well, much easier to feel your horses rhythm and much easier to stay over their center of gravity - but my Coach wont allow me to start off in our jumping lessons at a canter. He says "Why work on what you already know how to do, work on what you have issues with" and he's right.

    So he forces me to approach a fence at the trot - BUT here is a great trick he showed me. The key is your upper body. Instead of leaving it tall, lean forward ever so slightly, so that it is just ahead of the verticle. Not so forward that your bodies weight is on your horses shoulders - but forward enough to remain with your horses center of gravity, while permitting your seat to remain solid and functional. Also, legs remain, at all times, wrapped around your horses girth.

    Why? Because your legs not only solidify you in your tack, but remain supportive and encouraging to your horse as they approach that fence. They keep your impulsion, they aid your horse to remain round, and they drive.

    THEN if your horse stops - your seat remains solid, your legs secure you, and your upper body is already over your horses center of gravity/movement.

    And - good for you for remaining at the pace that you are more comfortable with. Don't ever go beyond your comfort zone at a show - that is only something to be ventured during lessons.

    BUT as everyone said, this was a great learning experience for you. You've come so far with your girl, and you have come so far yourself. You have years ahead of you to grow together - Your coach will beable to help you out every step of the way.

    Did you have fun?!?!? Because that is what it is all meant to be about! Be super proud of yourself! You should be!!!! If I were there, I'd of been clapping for you, you have accomplished so much, just at this one show!

         
        06-22-2009, 02:54 PM
      #53
    Green Broke
    ^great advice! I also HATE HATE HATE riding jumps at the trot, but I have gotten alot better with Blue at least!
         
        06-22-2009, 06:12 PM
      #54
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MIEventer    
    Did you have fun?!?!? Because that is what it is all meant to be about! Be super proud of yourself! You should be!!!! If I were there, I'd of been clapping for you, you have accomplished so much, just at this one show!

    You know, it's funny...I was such a bundle of nerves the whole day that I didn't have much of any fun lol, which is NOT like me! I'm determined not to be so darn nervous this weekend (and may take a darn Xanax with me if that's what it takes LOL!!)

    Because I was so nervous, I was overthinking a LOT of it...and as far as x-c goes, I do the SAME thing you mentioned you do approaching at the trot...I just sit there and think "when is she going to jump?!" and then I anticipate so much that I get way too far ahead. I'm going to try what you suggest about leaning just ahead of the verticle tomorrow at my schooling day. Did you mean you do that while posting, or sitting? Normally I see people approach either posting or up in a 2 pt position...if I post sometimes she jumps when I'm on the "downward" part of the post and I get freaked out because it makes me get left behind...so normally about 2 or 3 strides out I go into 2 pt position...but in this case, it worked against me, because then she refused and I was a goner! Maybe my 2-pt is too far forward? I guess my trainer will let me know!

    Also, doesn't help that my stirrups were higher than I'm used to, and doubt they needed to be with those tiny jumps! I thought about lowering them a hole just before I went and then decided not to because everyone else's legs looked that high too..I should have just put them down to where I was more comfortable, maybe my legs would have been on more and prevented it.
         
        06-22-2009, 06:21 PM
      #55
    Green Broke
    You can be in front of the verticle when posting, I'm guessing that's what she ment! I ride my coursing in full seat or half seat, never full two point unless im galloping.
         
        06-22-2009, 07:31 PM
      #56
    Started
    Obviously I can't speak for MIE, but here's my suggestion

    TO get a nit forwrad, really concentrate on posting on your thighs. Pretend you pockets are full of needles and stay off of them. Keep posting right to the base of the jump. If you are on your thighs, Sandie's jumping will move with you, pushing you forward into the right position. On your butt bones, the jumping motion will move against you and push you further behind.
         
        06-24-2009, 09:13 PM
      #57
    Trained
    I just caught up with this thread. HITS, I LOVE your mare. She is adorable and so willing. I loved watching your schooling video. When she cantered through the water, I was thinking, "you go girl!" You two have come along so quickly. You obviously have a very competent instructor.

    I have two suggestions. If anyone else already mentioned them, please disregard. I read most of this thread, but breezed through some of it.

    I noticed a few things during your cross country. I know you were nervous about your first event, so I'm sure it played a role. While your position between jumps was great, when you got to an actual jump, you seemd to suck back a bit like you weren't 100% committed to jumping it. It looked like you stopped riding a few strides out and left it to her. If she's like my horse, she's probably looking for a little more guidance. I'm not in anyway suggesting micromanageing. That's the last thing you want to do. You said you have a tendency to jump ahead. I'm guessing that you "assume the jumping" position a few strides early and she feels like you're not up there guiding her. Obviously you don't want to catch her in the mouth, but a soft rein contact on approach might work better for her. Also, try to really march her up to those fences. Jumping from a trot can be jarring for the rider and make it difficult for a horse that's going too slowly. I think you'll find if you get her up to them in a nice, energetic, engaged trot, the jumps won't bump you out of the saddle. Also, if you start concentrating more on riding right up to the fence, your jumping ahead issue might resolve on its own.

    The other thing I see is you float your hands over her neck rather than use a crest release. At the pace you two are moving, you'll be ready to use the automatic release soon enough, but maybe you should experiment with some other hand placements. For cross country, maybe try a crest release and plant your hands on her mane for an added base of support. For maximum security, maybe try bridging your reins. That would also give your mare a more consistent contact that she might be looking for.

    As for falling off, if I can determine which side I'm exiting from, I try to dig in with my opposite leg like it was a pick axe to try to pull myself back over.

    Congrats on your first show. You two make such a nice pair.
         
        06-24-2009, 09:58 PM
      #58
    Green Broke
    now this is how it's done!
         
        06-25-2009, 05:34 AM
      #59
    Weanling
    Im not going to add anything as its been said already but wanted to say too things

    I love your horse - she's gorgoues - colour is neat :) and you guys look like a great team

    And well done on your dressage - that's fantastic.... don't worry too much re the fall in xcountry just try and learn from it - which you obviously are....


    So whens your next event
         
        06-25-2009, 12:12 PM
      #60
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
    I just caught up with this thread. HITS, I LOVE your mare. She is adorable and so willing. I loved watching your schooling video. When she cantered through the water, I was thinking, "you go girl!" You two have come along so quickly. You obviously have a very competent instructor.

    I have two suggestions. If anyone else already mentioned them, please disregard. I read most of this thread, but breezed through some of it.

    I noticed a few things during your cross country. I know you were nervous about your first event, so I'm sure it played a role. While your position between jumps was great, when you got to an actual jump, you seemd to suck back a bit like you weren't 100% committed to jumping it. It looked like you stopped riding a few strides out and left it to her. If she's like my horse, she's probably looking for a little more guidance. I'm not in anyway suggesting micromanageing. That's the last thing you want to do. You said you have a tendency to jump ahead. I'm guessing that you "assume the jumping" position a few strides early and she feels like you're not up there guiding her. Obviously you don't want to catch her in the mouth, but a soft rein contact on approach might work better for her. Also, try to really march her up to those fences. Jumping from a trot can be jarring for the rider and make it difficult for a horse that's going too slowly. I think you'll find if you get her up to them in a nice, energetic, engaged trot, the jumps won't bump you out of the saddle. Also, if you start concentrating more on riding right up to the fence, your jumping ahead issue might resolve on its own.

    The other thing I see is you float your hands over her neck rather than use a crest release. At the pace you two are moving, you'll be ready to use the automatic release soon enough, but maybe you should experiment with some other hand placements. For cross country, maybe try a crest release and plant your hands on her mane for an added base of support. For maximum security, maybe try bridging your reins. That would also give your mare a more consistent contact that she might be looking for.

    As for falling off, if I can determine which side I'm exiting from, I try to dig in with my opposite leg like it was a pick axe to try to pull myself back over.

    Congrats on your first show. You two make such a nice pair.
    Thank you! Couple things I wanted to respond to...

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
    I'm guessing that you "assume the jumping" position a few strides early and she feels like you're not up there guiding her. Obviously you don't want to catch her in the mouth, but a soft rein contact on approach might work better for her. Also, try to really march her up to those fences. Jumping from a trot can be jarring for the rider and make it difficult for a horse that's going too slowly. I think you'll find if you get her up to them in a nice, energetic, engaged trot, the jumps won't bump you out of the saddle.
    You're very right...it comes from early jumping training (by early I mean the first month because I've only been doing it for a couple months now lol, but you get the idea!)...my trainer would just have me get into 2-pt a few strides out because the horse just started learning to jump too and he didn't want me getting her in the mouth and freaking her out about jumping in general. So now it's a bad habit of mine and it does feel unstable to me once I do it!

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
    I think you'll find if you get her up to them in a nice, energetic, engaged trot, the jumps won't bump you out of the saddle. Also, if you start concentrating more on riding right up to the fence, your jumping ahead issue might resolve on its own.
    This one's difficult for me, because Sandie does trot SO fast! If it were up to her, she'd RUN up to each jump and fly over it! I am actually holding her back on the approach...my trainer wants her to learn to come at the approach in a calm and steady manner, not just rushing up to it (you can see her do it in my video, at the second jump)...but then sometimes it's EASIER for me when she does rush up to it! He just always tells me not to, so I end up slowing her down and then it's all awkward I think we'll just have to chalk it up to both our inexperience, and maybe when she gets more balanced and used to this, she won't want to run to the jumps anymore and I won't be holding her back the whole time, which then can result in what happened when she refused.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
    The other thing I see is you float your hands over her neck rather than use a crest release. At the pace you two are moving, you'll be ready to use the automatic release soon enough, but maybe you should experiment with some other hand placements. For cross country, maybe try a crest release and plant your hands on her mane for an added base of support. For maximum security, maybe try bridging your reins. That would also give your mare a more consistent contact that she might be looking for.
    I know, that looked horrid haha...that was all nerves and me forgetting to release at all! Normally I do a crest release because I'm not advanced enough for the automatic release yet and I want to make 100% sure I'm not hitting her in the mouth. But the darn nerves got the best of me that day!!

    Thanks so much for your input, I really appreciate it. (and thanks for the tip about the falling off, I'll have to remember that for our next show which is this weekend!!)
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Any good tips for building confidence in jumping?? figaro Jumping 2 06-07-2009 03:43 PM
    Good dressage horses available Spyder Horses for Sale 0 03-07-2009 11:43 AM
    Starting in Dressage...any tips? Dressage10135 Horse Riding Critique 7 02-19-2009 07:14 AM
    What body score would you give this guy? Ottakee Horse Health 13 11-29-2008 11:38 PM
    what is a good dressage book? Jubilee Rose English Riding 1 10-22-2008 02:47 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:35 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0