Tips on How to Sit a Bouncy Trot?
 
 

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Tips on How to Sit a Bouncy Trot?

This is a discussion on Tips on How to Sit a Bouncy Trot? within the Dressage forums, part of the English Riding category
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    08-13-2009, 07:15 AM
  #1
Yearling
Tips on How to Sit a Bouncy Trot?

So I am soon going to be able to ride a Dutch Warmblood named Niena who has the bounciest trot in the WORLD! (that may be a slight exaggeration). And I want to work on being able to sit her trot. I can do it if I have no stirrups, but once I pick up my stirrups I just can't. I've noticed, also, that when I sit it with no stirrups I tilt my pelvis slightly forward and my upper body back. Is that okay to do or is there an easier way? So does anyone have any suggestions for sitting a bouncy trot?
     
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    08-13-2009, 10:28 AM
  #2
Started
Just try to do what you are doin wen you have no stirrups and you should be able to keep your balance and do more no stirrups so that you will be used to her trot wen you take the stirrups back hope that helped
     
    08-13-2009, 12:07 PM
  #3
Trained
Doing the sitting trot with no stirrups, while it is good practice to develop an independent seat, is not really going to help you a whole ton. You need to learn to use the stirrups to create a "bow" shape with your legs around the horse and really use the shape as a shock absorber. It's tough to explain but your feet are going to swing in and out at the same time your knees swing out and in, so in the moment of suspension in the trot your legs will be almost straight and at the "down" moment, your legs are going to be bowed around the horse like brackets ().
In order to make this happen, first of all your stirrups have to be the correct length, after doing 5 - 10 minutes of no stirrup work, stop, don't move your legs and adjust the stirrups so that they are hitting your ankles, this should be correct. If they are too long in a few minutes, then shorten them.
Then you need to have a really free pelvis and be able to use your back and ab muscles to hold yourself in the motion. Sitting with your upper body extremely slightly behind the vertical can be useful to get the motion, but don't make a habit of it. Your back should be relatively flat and your ab muscles should hurt. Keep your elbows tucked into your sides and drive your shoulders towards your hips until your elbows are in contact with your hip bones.
Good luck!
     
    08-14-2009, 12:18 AM
  #4
Yearling
I have a horse that has a bouncy trot so I'm working on it as well. At first just try sitting a few steps at a time and start posting again when you feel out of balance, and don't attempt to sit the trot again until you and your horse are balanced well. I try to think of sitting on the back of my thighs. Don't try to brace against the movement, think of absorbing it.
     
    08-18-2009, 05:48 PM
  #5
Foal
It's easier to sit your horse's trot when her back is nice and round and she's very balanced. Once you pick your stirrups back up, then sit only a few strides at a time. Coupled with the slightly behind the vertical posture, it will help you begin to get the feel. Once you build on the feel you can correct your position and go longer. While you are working on the feel your muscles will be building up strength and the "memory" to help you maintain.
     
    08-19-2009, 01:49 AM
  #6
Weanling
Like you said... when you ride no stirrups your pelvis is more forward and your body is more back. If you do that with the stirrups it should help. It helps me to lean back and I almost never ride on my butt. Usually I stay on my inner thigh, as if I were standing over the horse, not sitting on it. Also, get your weight down. I find a good way to do this is to stand up in your stirrups, heels down.. then when you sit back down.. keep that same pressure that you had when you were standing on your feet.
I stop and stand every once in a while to get my weight down, but it helps.
     
    08-22-2009, 02:49 AM
  #7
Foal
Push the sitting trot (not over the top) but like pushing a swing to make it go higher. You use the same muscels as that. This will also be easier to keep her going instead of kicking her. I find this helps a heap in dressage tests but be careful not to sit to far back other wise you would be pushing her TOO far forward!!!
Good luck
     
    09-17-2009, 07:12 PM
  #8
Green Broke
When I got my new horse I roe her bareback ALOT to get used to her stride because she has a really long stride and im used to a little thoroughbreds stride... I found that helped.
     
    09-20-2009, 09:15 AM
  #9
Yearling
Okay, thanks for all of the replies! I'm sadly still trying to find a time to test out on her :( (at my barn we have to do a riding test before we can ride the horse independantly). But once I do, I will try all of your suggestions! Unfortunately I can't ride her bareback as she HATES it- she will buck people off if they get on her without a saddle :S.
     
    09-22-2009, 10:42 PM
  #10
Foal
I would recomend attaching a grab strap at the pommel of your saddle and when sitting hook your thumbs under and pull your body down so you get feel for the movement,Make sure your back is supple along with the horses back. You will notice a difference when the horses back is supple. Also it helps if you use your abs, really push your sit bones in the saddle and absorbe the momentom and movement. :) Good Luck!
     

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