Tossing head when asked for upward transitions - Page 3
 
 

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Tossing head when asked for upward transitions

This is a discussion on Tossing head when asked for upward transitions within the Dressage forums, part of the English Riding category
  • Kyra kyrklund hold outside stirrup leather
  • Horse tosses head all transitions

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    03-19-2012, 07:51 PM
  #21
Banned
He looked like he wanted to flex his neck down well during those canter circles and your hands were blocking him.

I think you pinpointed part of the issue (hands that do not follow). Now that you are aware of it, be hyper aware of it and fix it. I'd suggesting lengthening your reins just a bit and bringing your elbows back the same amount. As our joints approach full extension, their flexibility and suppleness disappears PDQ.
     
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    03-19-2012, 11:12 PM
  #22
Green Broke
Yeah I think that's the root of my issues, and she tends to dive down and drag me over her head lol partly why I have developed some of that habit. She's become a ton better in the 3 yrs I've had her and been training her though, she's a smart cookie and puts up with an intermediate rider on her who started training her as a beginner herself now that she's lighter I think I need to use my core more to hold her from dragging me down and follow more with my arms instead.

I'll try really following her in an over the top way when I rode tomorrow and see what happens!
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    03-20-2012, 11:44 PM
  #23
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoofprints in the Sand    
I think I need to use my core more to hold her from dragging me down and follow more with my arms instead.


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YES!!! I'm watching the vids and all I see is hands and legs working... nothing in the middle. Like you've realized, you really need to get some bend in your elbows and be able to use your hands to lift her up. Primo likes to dive and root like she does and I do a lot of transitions and change in direction (serpentine, quarter lines, etc). My hands rarely move though. I'll lift my inside hand occasionally to encourage bend or remind him that his weight is to be back. Your core should be doing most of the work, with your legs cuing and hands capturing the motion.
     
    03-25-2012, 05:24 PM
  #24
Foal
I am not an expert by any means but I have something my instructor told me the other day which I think might help with your hands although I could be wrong. You say when she gives you give up the contact well I have the same problem I always let the reins slip through my hands as soon as the horse ask for more which, of course, does nothing to help his outline. So my instructorhad me take up a rather short contact well, it was short for me haha, I then asked to start rounding over his back and as soon as he softened even a tiny amount instead of completely giveing the rein away like I normally would he had me release for a second, to reward him and let him know that was the right thing to do, and then take the contact back the improvement in my horse in just one session was amazing and made my contact much more consistent heres a before and after picture to give you an idea of the improvement
     
    03-26-2012, 02:16 AM
  #25
Weanling
I read this tip somewhere by Kyra Kyrklund, and haven't tried it myself at this point, so don't know how effective it is, but sounds helpful.

To help with a consistent outside rein, pull your outside leftover stirrup leather (if you have enough left) out of its keeper and take hold of it. Gives you something to keep your hand steady in its correct position.
     
    03-26-2012, 08:50 AM
  #26
Green Broke
Thanks for the tips! I kind of had an "aha" moment during my lesson this weekend...my instructor told me "when you post UP, push your hands DOWN" and I know she's said things like that before to me, but it finally clicked! That has really helped me keep my hands from creeping UP and allowing my mare room to "escape" with her shoulders or hollow out her back. Now, on to figuring out consistent contact! Haha

Hope to have some new videos posted this week for you guys, thanks for all your helpful tips!
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    04-04-2012, 09:57 AM
  #27
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by JessXxX    
I am not an expert by any means but I have something my instructor told me the other day which I think might help with your hands although I could be wrong. You say when she gives you give up the contact well I have the same problem I always let the reins slip through my hands as soon as the horse ask for more which, of course, does nothing to help his outline. So my instructorhad me take up a rather short contact well, it was short for me haha, I then asked to start rounding over his back and as soon as he softened even a tiny amount instead of completely giveing the rein away like I normally would he had me release for a second, to reward him and let him know that was the right thing to do, and then take the contact back the improvement in my horse in just one session was amazing and made my contact much more consistent heres a before and after picture to give you an idea of the improvement
The thing that's confusing for me is, how do you know when your keeping short contact vs. being hard on his mouth? I still need to work on that and I can't seem to get it right just yet.
     
    04-04-2012, 10:42 AM
  #28
Trained
Keeping too loose of a rein is actually harsher on the horse's mouth then having constant contact. If you want to make a small adjustment with too long reins, the contact goes from absolutely nothing to pulling in a split second and is very abrupt on the horse's mouth. If your reins are short enough that you have a light contact with the mouth, and if you are grabbing mane or holding onto a bucking strap, your arms will learn to follow the motion of the horse, and if you want to make an adjustment all it takes is a turn of the wrist.

Good luck!
     
    04-04-2012, 10:46 AM
  #29
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~    
Keeping too loose of a rein is actually harsher on the horse's mouth then having constant contact. If you want to make a small adjustment with too long reins, the contact goes from absolutely nothing to pulling in a split second and is very abrupt on the horse's mouth. If your reins are short enough that you have a light contact with the mouth, and if you are grabbing mane or holding onto a bucking strap, your arms will learn to follow the motion of the horse, and if you want to make an adjustment all it takes is a turn of the wrist.

Good luck!
Thank you!
     

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