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A trainer's accomplishments - important?

This is a discussion on A trainer's accomplishments - important? within the Dressage forums, part of the English Riding category
  • Achievements and accomplishments of teacher trainer
  • What is more important trainer or horse

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    11-27-2013, 02:44 PM
  #11
Yearling
Personally a good trainer is one with happy horses who can teach me to the fullest of her capabilities. For instance, I got the opportunity to ride with a really accredited dressage instructor. I figured it would be a nice change of pace from my normal one who's a woman who shows locally and takes lessons to get high up in the levels (though let me say, she can ride like nobody's business). After two lessons with the accredited dressage instructor I began to wonder if she really deserved all those ribbons and trophies or medals or if the judges had a thumb up their butts when they watched her ride.

To me showing and winning is just something done on the side. It's so political nowadays that the worst riders can place high if they're on the right horse with the right bloodlines imo. I'd much rather have a no name trainer who taught me and the horse well then a big name trainer who could barely ride and solely relied on her achievements to get students and teach.

Heck, my trainer right now I didn't know had won several grand championships, has enough ribbons and trophies to kill a horse (pun intended lol) and guess where they are. In a dusty closet ready to be thrown away, or donated to local shows who need awards to give out. She told me that showing does not define a rider or horse, and it doesn't make you any better or worse off, all it is is marketing. Give me a no name rider who can actually ride, and train me and the horse any day.
     
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    12-01-2013, 02:34 PM
  #12
Green Broke
When I was looking for a trainer, I went on BD's Website, the first thing I looked at was what level have they ridden to, second thing and arguably the more important thing was what level have thier students ridden too.

I got lucky and found a trainer who has ridden at Grand prix (and scored well) and who has had students that have ridden to GP (in juniors, young riders and adult classes) and advanced eventing.

I believe that just being able to ride to that level is not enough, you must be able to teach! However I don't want to be taught by someone who has no provable experianceat a higher level than I am riding at.
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    12-01-2013, 07:23 PM
  #13
Weanling
I do like a trainer that has won. To me it shows dedication to their discipline.

I do like a trainer that still takes lessons themselves to make sure they have not developed any bad habits.....which are easy to pick up.

I like a trainer who goes to clinics to learn.

I like one who does hold a judges card.

I like a trainer who is good with horses.....even when they are riding my little Arab and they laugh at his antics.

I like a trainer that communicates to my level and that I can understand.

I like a trainer who is willing to ride your horse in order to show you your horse can do things, but you as a rider need work...lol

I live in BF western PA and have some how been graced with two dressage trainers that have all of the above! And the hour lessons do not break my bank.

And no yellers. I'm 53 and do not need someone screaming insults my way. I'm also red headed and would probably do bodily harm if someone did.
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    12-01-2013, 07:50 PM
  #14
Trained
I look at what the trainer's students and horses are doing. That is how I pick a trainer for my horse and a riding coach for me. Not everyone that can do it, can teach it, teaching is a skill.
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    12-01-2013, 07:54 PM
  #15
Started
@ Incitatus32: I agree with you completely.

@ sarahfromsc: You said you like a trainer who has won because it shows dedication to their dedication.
I agree with you, but I don't agree with you.
I do know that ribbons show how well a person ahs doneand how hard they have worked to get there, but maybe something happened to another amazing rider and that small reason put them so they couldn't place. WHat aobut in big state events where they only do grand and reserve grand camp and to third place where there is so many entries.
I do see your point, and like I said - I do agree but I disagree.
I got reserve champ two years in a row with different horses. The first year I used Golley and the Second year I used brisco. The year I used Brisco I let one of my friends use Golley - she didn't place at all, but she also had no idea what to do because even though I taught her everything I knew, she didn't listen and did things her way - she was a first timer at this as well.
     
    12-01-2013, 08:00 PM
  #16
Yearling
I didn't wade through all of the responses but agree with others. Not all good trainers can ride and not all good riders can teach. My current trainer can ride and teach to at least Grand Prix level but he has never shown in a recognized show as far as I can find. He has brought my horse and I very far in the 10 weeks or so I have been riding with him.

Another trainer I use occasionally has his gold medal but his teaching style is geared probably more towards people riding the upper levels; he has a hard time bringing down things to a more basic level for those, like me, generally just starting out with dressage. I believe he shows at the Intermediare and FEI levels but can't confirm as Centerline is down...again.

I watched a recent video of another trainer I have had, a good instructor, but, I was very surprised at her actual riding; it wasn't the level of riding I would expect from her based upon her knowledge.
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    12-03-2013, 01:57 PM
  #17
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by DancingArabian    
How much does a trainer's show record matter to you when trainer shopping? Would you be okay with a trainer that's proven in local/unrated shows or only if they have medals?
When I was looking for one I looked at 1) years of experience teaching and training (and riding of course), 2) level of riding (yes, that includes showing :) ), 3) recommendations.

If we talk dressage here (or jumping) I'd always go with someone high level over low level. Simply because in my experience (so please no offense to anyone, I/my horse was a tough case to work with ) such trainers know so much more that they can address your problems and help you to progress. I had no luck at all with trainers riding low levels. But it's just me...

BTW, if you are interested (I'm not sure how close you are though ) I can PM you my trainer's name. I found her by recommendations and she's absolutely awesome.
     
    12-03-2013, 03:10 PM
  #18
Foal
Interesting.

I don't see why someone should nessecarily be judged by their "accomplishements." Accomplishments are all relative.

It's already been said that some judges barely even consider the rider and skill level, and soley judge based off the horse and pedigree.

Also, not all people have an interest in showing - but that doesn't mean they don't know their stuff. Someone could ride just as well as any Gold medalist out there, but just not be interested in showing. Not everyone wants to deal with the politics of the show world, or the cost.

I played very serious competive volleyball in highschool. During the school year, I learned from the hired Coaches and staff that were available. During the off season, I trained on a team that was coached by a Bronze Medalist volleyball player. You know what? In the end, they all knew the same exact amount about volleyball. While one had the "accomplishments" of the olympics, the others were just as good as teaching as she was. They, however, just had no interest in being an Olympic athlete - their lives just didn't take the same path.

With that being said, I would train with a trainer that made me feel comfortable, let me enjoy my time riding, and allowed to move as high as I liked -or just plod around the arena every lesson for years to come. After all, I am paying for their service.

Awards and ribbons are nice, of course, but I wounldn't discount someone just because they didn't show an interest in that lifestyle. Doesn't mean they can't help direct someone else to the proper means it takes to get to GP level, or even an Olympic medal.
     
    12-03-2013, 06:44 PM
  #19
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by thatkrayz    
Interesting.

I don't see why someone should nessecarily be judged by their "accomplishements." Accomplishments are all relative.

It's already been said that some judges barely even consider the rider and skill level, and soley judge based off the horse and pedigree.

Also, not all people have an interest in showing - but that doesn't mean they don't know their stuff. Someone could ride just as well as any Gold medalist out there, but just not be interested in showing. Not everyone wants to deal with the politics of the show world, or the cost.

I played very serious competive volleyball in highschool. During the school year, I learned from the hired Coaches and staff that were available. During the off season, I trained on a team that was coached by a Bronze Medalist volleyball player. You know what? In the end, they all knew the same exact amount about volleyball. While one had the "accomplishments" of the olympics, the others were just as good as teaching as she was. They, however, just had no interest in being an Olympic athlete - their lives just didn't take the same path.

With that being said, I would train with a trainer that made me feel comfortable, let me enjoy my time riding, and allowed to move as high as I liked -or just plod around the arena every lesson for years to come. After all, I am paying for their service.

Awards and ribbons are nice, of course, but I wounldn't discount someone just because they didn't show an interest in that lifestyle. Doesn't mean they can't help direct someone else to the proper means it takes to get to GP level, or even an Olympic medal.

WHAAAAAAAT?? Seriously?!? Dressage judges don't have easy access to your horse's bloodlines. They aren't Googling you during your once around - flatter yourself as much as you would like.
They judge what is in front of them and if it's crap - you're getting a crap score. Nothing to do with that your horse isn't by De Niro.

That's just something that people who do poorly say. It's called being a bad loser. I've earned every single one of my 40% tests by riding like a sack of flaming dog poo. And I've earned all my 70% tests as well, by riding well.


I think it's silly to think that someone who can't go out and ride a test in front of an FEI judge and earn a decent score has any right to be telling others how to ride. It's called earning your stripes. It's why lawyers have to pass the bar, engineers have to go through a rigorous certification process, vets are tested, doctors go through agonizing practicums etc.. etc.. You have to EARN the right to be a professional in whatever you do. And just because your mum thinks you are a great rider is not a good reason to hang a shingle. We have a responsibility to raise the level of riding knowledge in NA. Because right now it's severely lacking.
     
    12-03-2013, 06:47 PM
  #20
Yearling
I show so a good show record is important to me. It let's me know that the trains actually has the chops to ride and train at a high level and they aren't all just talk.

But personality, method, and many other factors also affect who I'll choose as a trainer.
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